Search results for 'Silvia A. Bunge' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 1680.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
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  2. [deleted]Silvia A. Bunge (2012). The Developing Human Brain: A Frontiers Research Topic. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 1410.0
    The Developing Human Brain: A Frontiers Research Topic.
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  3. [deleted]Pedro M. Paz-Alonso, Simona Ghetti, Bryan J. Matlen, Michael C. Anderson & Silvia A. Bunge (2009). Memory Suppression is an Active Process That Improves Over Childhood. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 960.0
    We all have memories that we prefer not to think about. The ability to suppress retrieval of unwanted memories has been documented in behavioral and neuroimaging research using the Think/No-Think (TNT) paradigm with adults. Attempts to stop memory retrieval are associated with increased activation of lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and concomitant reduced activation in medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures. However, the extent to which children have the ability to actively suppress their memories is unknown. This study investigated memory suppression in (...)
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  4. [deleted]Samantha B. Wright, Bryan J. Matlen, Carol L. Baym, Emilio Ferrer & Silvia A. Bunge (2007). Neural Correlates of Fluid Reasoning in Children and Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:8.score: 960.0
    Fluid reasoning, or the capacity to think logically and solve novel problems, is central to the development of human cognition, but little is known about the underlying neural changes. During the acquisition of event-related fMRI data, children aged 6-13 (N = 16) and young adults (N = 17) performed a task in which they were asked to identify semantic relationships between drawings of common objects. On semantic problems, participants indicated which of fi ve objects was most closely semantically related to (...)
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  5. Silvia A. Bunge & Michael J. Souza (2008). Neural Representations Used to Specify Action. In Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.), Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 870.0
  6. [deleted]Bunge Silvia (2010). A Structured Connectionist Model of Rostrolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 810.0
  7. M. W. Aulls, M. Ben-Ari, A. Berarroch, M. Bunge, L. M. Burko, L. Cardellini, M. Cini, A. Cordero, K. C. De Berg & J. Dodick (2003). Abd-El-Khalick, F., 787 Adúriz-Bravo, A., 27 Allchin, D., 315 Astore, WJ, 185. Science and Education 12:807-808.score: 580.0
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  8. Mario Bunge (1982). Is Chemistry a Branch of Physics? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 13 (2):209-223.score: 420.0
    Summary Opinion is divided as to whether chemistry is reducible to physics. The problem can be given a satisfactory solution provided three conditions are met: that a science not be identified with its theories; that several notions of theory dependence be distinguished; and that quantum chemistry, rather than classical chemistry, be compared with physics. This paper proposes to perform all three tasks. It does so by analyzing the methodological concepts concerned as well as by examining the way a chemical rate (...)
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  9. Martin Mahner & Mario Bunge (2001). Function and Functionalism: A Synthetic Perspective. Philosophy of Science 68 (1):75-94.score: 420.0
    In this paper we examine the following problems: How many concepts of function are there in biology, social science, and technology? Are they logically related and if so, how? Which of these function concepts effect a functional explanation as opposed to a mere functional account? What are the consequences of a pluralist view of functions for functionalism? We submit that there are five concepts of function in biology, which are logically related in a particular way, and six function concepts in (...)
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  10. Mario Bunge (1963). A General Black Box Theory. Philosophy of Science 30 (4):346-358.score: 420.0
    A mathematical theory is proposed and exemplified, which covers an extended class of black boxes. Every kind of stimulus and response is pictured by a channel connecting the box with its environment. The input-output relation is given by a postulate schema according to which the response is, in general, a nonlinear functional of the input. Several examples are worked out: the perfectly transmitting box, the damping box, and the amplifying box. The theory is shown to be (a) an extension of (...)
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  11. Mario Bunge (2010). Matter and Mind: A Philosophical Inquiry. Springer Verlag.score: 420.0
    pt. I. Matter: 1. Philosophy as worldview ; 2. Classical matter: bodies and fields ; 3. Quantum matter: weird but real ; 4. General concept of matter: to be is to become ; 5. Emergence and levels ; 6. Naturalism ; 7. Materialism -- pt. II. Mind: 8. The mind-body problem ; 9. Minding matter: the plastic brain ; 10. Mind and society ; 11. Cognition, consciousness, and free will ; 12. Brain and computer: the hardware/software dualism ; 13. Knowledge: (...)
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  12. Mario Bunge (1972). A Program for the Semantics of Science. Journal of Philosophical Logic 1 (3/4):317 - 328.score: 420.0
    Our program is ambitious, as is any attempt to match life (in our case real science) with virtue (e.g., exactness). We want our semantics to be not only simia mathematicae but also ancilla scientiae: built more geometrico and at the same time relevant, nay useful, to live science. The goal of exactness may sound arrogant but is actually modest, for the more we rigorize the more we are forced to leave out of consideration, at least for the time being. As (...)
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  13. Mario Augusto Bunge (2001). Scientific Realism: Selected Essays of Mario Bunge. Prometheus Books.score: 420.0
    Machine generated contents note: I. METAPHYSICS -- 1. How Do Realism, Materialism, and Dialectics Fare in Contemporary Science? (1973) -- 2. New Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1954) -- 3. Energy: Between Physics and Metaphysics (2000) -- 4. The Revival of Causality (1982) -- 5. Emergence and the Mind (1977) -- 6 SCIENTIFIC REALISM -- 6. The Status of Concepts (1981) -- 7. Popper's Unworldly World 3 (1981) --II. METHODOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE -- 8. On Method in (...)
     
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  14. Mario Bunge (1991). A Critical Examination of the New Sociology of Science Part. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (4):524-560.score: 360.0
  15. Martin Mahner & Mario Bunge (1996). The Incompatibility of Science and Religion Sustained: A Reply to Our Critics. Science and Education 5 (2):189-199.score: 360.0
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  16. Mario Bunge (1961). Ethics as a Science. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (2):139-152.score: 360.0
  17. Mario Bunge (1962). Causality: A Rejoinder. Philosophy of Science 29 (3):306-317.score: 360.0
  18. Mario Bunge (1977). Towards a Technoethics. The Monist 60 (1):96-107.score: 360.0
  19. Mario Bunge (1960). Levels: A Semantical Preliminary. Review of Metaphysics 13 (3):396 - 406.score: 360.0
  20. Mario Bunge (1985). Individuos, Conjuntos Y Sistemas (Réplica a Mosterín). Theoria 1 (2):555-560.score: 360.0
  21. Mario Bunge (1987). Why Parapsychology Cannot Become a Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):576.score: 360.0
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  22. Mario Bunge (1971). A New Look at Definite Descriptions. Kagaku Tetsugaku 4:131-146.score: 360.0
  23. Mario Bunge (1982). Desde una neurociencia sin mente y una psicología sin cerebro a la neuropsicología. Revista de Filosofia 20:5-22.score: 360.0
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  24. Mario Bunge (1984). Contra la Economía Escolástica: Respuesta a García-Bermejo Ochoa. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 14 (3):585-595.score: 360.0
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  25. Mario Bunge (1979). A Systems Concept of Society: Beyond Individualism and Holism. Theory and Decision 10 (1-4):13-30.score: 360.0
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  26. Nancy Bunge (2007). Emerson, Too Smart to Be a Philosopher. Philosophy Now 60:9-12.score: 360.0
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  27. Mario Bunge (1973). A Decision Theoretic Model of the American War in Vietnam. Theory and Decision 3 (4):323-338.score: 360.0
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  28. Mario Augusto Bunge (1980). The Mind-Body Problem: A Psychobiological Approach. Pergamon Press.score: 360.0
  29. Mario Bunge (1985). Cajas negras y translúcidas y acción a distancia. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 15 (1):271-274.score: 360.0
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  30. Marcia J. Bunge (ed.) (2012). Children, Adults, and Shared Responsibilities: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 300.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Marcia J. Bunge; Part I. Religious Understandings of Children and Obligations to Them: Central Beliefs and Practices: 1. The concept of the child embedded in Jewish law Elliot N. Dorff; 2. Children's spirituality in the Jewish narrative tradition Sandy Eisenberg Sasso; 3. Christian understandings of children and obligations to them: central Biblical themes and resources Marcia J. Bunge; 4. Human dignity and social responsibility: Catholic Social Thought on children William Werpehowski; 5. Islam, children, (...)
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  31. E. Bates, J. Elman, H. Beilin, A. Bourguigon, M. Bunge, R. Case, D. Ciccetti, L. Cosmides & J. Tobby (1993). Cultural Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):495-552.score: 280.0
     
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  32. A. Aquinas, Robert Audi, Martin Bickman, Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams, Mario Bunge, Steven M. Cahn, Lawrence Cahoone & Dennis Carlson (2003). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 26 (2).score: 240.0
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  33. Jerzy Brezezinski, Eugenio Bulygin, Jean-Louis Gardies, Ilkka Niiniluoto, Mario A. Bunge, D. Reidei, Paul M. Churchland & Clifford A. Hooker (1987). Ayer, Alfred J., Wittgenstein, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, London, 1985. Belnap, Nuel D. And B. Steel, Thomas, Logik Oon Frage Und Antwort, Vieweg, Braunschweig Und Wiesbaden, 1985. Boer, Stephen E. And William G. Lycan, Knowing Who, MIT Press, Cambridge and London, 1986. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 27:433-435.score: 240.0
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  34. [deleted]Bunge Silvia (2010). Changes in Prefrontal Function Over Childhood and Adolescence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 240.0
  35. [deleted]Bunge Silvia (2011). Neurodevelopmental Correlates of Monitoring the Temporal Context of Memories. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 240.0
  36. Andy Denis, Methodology and Policy Prescription in Economic Thought: A Response to Mario Bunge.score: 144.0
    Bunge (2000) distinguishes two main methodological approaches of holism and individualism, and associates with them policy prescriptions of centralism and laissez-faire. He identifies systemism as a superior approach to both the study and management of society. The present paper, seeking to correct and develop this line of thought, suggests a more complex relation between policy and methodology. There are two possible methodological underpinnings for laissez-faire: while writers such as Friedman and Lucas fit Bunge’s pattern, more sophisticated advocates of (...)
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  37. Mario Bunge (2004). How Does It Work?: The Search for Explanatory Mechanisms. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (2):182-210.score: 120.0
    This article addresses the following problems: What is a mechanism, how can it be discovered, and what is the role of the knowledge of mechanisms in scientific explanation and technological control? The proposed answers are these. A mechanism is one of the processes in a concrete system that makes it what it is — for example, metabolism in cells, interneuronal connections in brains, work in factories and offices, research in laboratories, and litigation in courts of law. Because mechanisms are largely (...)
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  38. Mario Bunge (1997). Mechanism and Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (4):410-465.score: 120.0
    The aim of this article is to elucidate the notions of explanation and mechanism, in particular of the social kind. A mechanism is defined as what makes a concrete system tick, and it is argued that to propose an explanation proper is to exhibit a lawful mechanism. The so-called covering law model is shown to exhibit only the logical aspect of explanation: it just subsumes particulars under universals. A full or mechanismic explanation involves mechanismic law statements, not purely descriptive ones (...)
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  39. Mario Bunge (1961). Kinds and Criteria of Scientific Laws. Philosophy of Science 28 (3):260-281.score: 120.0
    Factual statements that might qualify for the status of law statements are classed from various philosophically relevant standpoints (referents, precision, structure of predicates, extension, systemicity, inferential power, inception, ostensiveness, testability, levels, and determination categories). More than seven dozen of not mutually exclusive kinds of lawlike statements emerge. Strictly universal and counterfactually powerful statements are seen to constitute just one kind of lawlike statements; classificatory and some statistical laws, e.g., are shown not to comply with the requirements of universality and counterfactual (...)
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  40. Mario Bunge, Systemism: The Alternative to Individualism and Holism.score: 120.0
    Three radical worldviews and research approaches are salient in social studies: individualism, holism, and systemism. Individualism focuses on the composition of social systems, whereas holism focuses on their structure. Neither of them is adequate, one because all individuals are interrelated and two because there are no relations without relata. The only cogent and viable alternative is systemism, according to which everything is either a system or a component of a system, and every system has peculiar (emergent) properties that its components (...)
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  41. Mario Bunge (2000). Ten Modes of Individualism--None of Which Works--And Their Alternatives. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):384-406.score: 120.0
    Individualism comes in at least ten modes: ontological, logical, semantic, epistemological, methodological, axiological, praxiological, ethical, historical, and political. These modes are bound together. For example, ontological individualism motivates the thesis that relations are n-tuples of individuals, as well as radical reductionism and libertarianism. The flaws and merits of all ten sides of the individualist decagon are noted. So are those of its holist counterpart. It is argued that systemism has all the virtues and none of the defects of individualism and (...)
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  42. Mario Bunge (1996). The Seven Pillars of Popper's Social Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (4):528-556.score: 120.0
    The author submits that Popper's social philosophy rests on seven pillars: rationality (both conceptual and practical), individualism (ontological and methodological), libertarianism, the nonexistence of historical laws, negative utilitarianism ("Do no harm"), piecemeal social engineering, and a view on social order. The first six pillars are judged to be weak, and the seventh broken. In short, it is argued that Popper did not build a comprehensive, profound, or even consistent system of social philosophy on a par with his work in epistemology. (...)
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  43. Mario Bunge (2010). Reading Measuring Instruments. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):85-93.score: 120.0
    The design, maintenance and use of all measuring instruments involve indicators of the thing, property, or event they are expected to detect or measure. And every quantitative indicator is a functional relation between imperceptible and perceptible facts—for example, the “flow” of time and the rotation of a watch’s hands. The empirical test of any quantitative hypothesis involves the translation of the unobservable variables occurring in it into the observable variable(s) in the indicator hypothesis. Yet, indicators have escaped the notice of (...)
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  44. Mario Augusto Bunge (1973). Philosophy of Physics. Boston,Reidel.score: 120.0
    PHILOSOPHY: BEACON OR TRAP* There was a time when everyone expected almost everything from philosophy. It was the time when philosophers drew confidently ...
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  45. John Wren-Lewis (1996). On Babies and Bathwater: A Non-Ideological Alternative to the Mahner/Bunge Proposals for Relating Science and Religion in Education. Science and Education 5 (2):185-188.score: 120.0
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  46. Mario Bunge (1960). The Place of Induction in Science. Philosophy of Science 27 (3):262-270.score: 120.0
    The place of induction in the framing and test of scientific hypotheses is investigated. The meaning of 'induction' is first equated with generalization on the basis of case examination. Two kinds of induction are then distinguished: the inference of generals from particulars (first degree induction), and the generalization of generalizations (second degree induction). Induction is claimed to play a role in the framing of modest empirical generalizations and in the extension of every sort of generalizations--not however in the invention of (...)
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  47. Marta Bunge (1984). Toposes in Logic and Logic in Toposes. Topoi 3 (1):13-22.score: 120.0
    The purpose of this paper is to justify the claim that Topos theory and Logic (the latter interpreted in a wide enough sense to include Model theory and Set theory) may interact to the advantage of both fields. Once the necessity of utilizing toposes (other than the topos of Sets) becomes apparent, workers in Topos theory try to make this task as easy as possible by employing a variety of methods which, in the last instance, find their justification in metatheorems (...)
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  48. Mario Bunge (1968). Physical Time: The Objective and Relational Theory. Philosophy of Science 35 (4):355-388.score: 120.0
    An objective and relational theory of local time is expounded and its philosophical implications are discussed in Sect. 2. In Sect. 3 certain physical and metaphysical questions concerning time are taken up in the light of that theory. The basic concepts of the theory are those of event, reference frame, chronometric scale, and time function. These are subject to four axioms: existence of events, frames and scales; time is a real valued function; the set of events is compact; and any (...)
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  49. Ravel Apostol (1985). About Mario Bunge's 'a Critical Examination of Dialectics'. Studies in East European Thought 29 (2):89-136.score: 120.0
  50. Andreas Pickel (2004). Systems and Mechanisms: A Symposium on Mario Bunge’s Philosophy of Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (2):169-181.score: 120.0
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