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  1. Simon Baron-Cohen, John Lawson, Rick Griffin & Jacqueline Hill, The Exact Mind: Empathising and Systemising in Autism Spectrum Conditions.
    Cognitive developmentalists have had a long-standing interest in neurodevelopmental conditions, such as autism. This is not only out of a desire to understand the causes of such atypical development, in order to advance medical science and develop interventions. It is also because studying the processes that cause atypicality can sometimes throw light on typical development. It is this two-way influence that characterises the field of developmental psychopathology. In this chapter, we focus on autism. We bring out this interaction between what (...)
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  2. Bonnie Auyeung & Simon Baron-Cohen (2013). Prenatal and Postnatal Testosterone Effects on Human Social And. In Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.), Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. Oup Oxford. 308.
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  3. Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.) (2013). Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.
    This book comprises 26 exciting chapters by internationally renowned scholars, addressing the central psychological proces separating humans from other animals: the ability to imagine the thoughts and feelings of othersm and to reflect on the contents of our own minds - a "theory of mind" (ToM).
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  4. Bhismadev Chakrabarti & Simon Baron-Cohen (2013). Understanding the Genetics of Empathy and the Autistic Spectrum. In Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.), Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. Oup Oxford. 326.
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  5. Donielle Johnson, Carrie Allison & Simon Baron-Cohen (2013). The Prevalence of Synesthesia. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. 1.
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  6. Rachel Louise Moseley, Bettina Mohr, Michael Vincent Lombardo, Simon Baron-Cohen, Olaf Hauk & Friedemann Pulvermuller (2013). Brain and Behavioural Correlates of Action Semantic Deficits in Autism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
    Action-perception circuits comprising neurons in the motor system have been proposed as main building blocks of higher cognition; accordingly, motor dysfunction should entail cognitive deficits. Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are marked by motor impairments but the implications of such motor dysfunction for higher cognition remain unclear. We here used word reading and semantic judgement tasks to interrogate action-related motor cognition and its corresponding fMRI brain activation in high-functioning adults with ASC. These participants exhibited hypoactivity of motor cortex in language processing (...)
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  7. Simon Baron-Cohen (2011). Autism, Empathizing-Systemizing (Es) Theory, and Pathological Altruism. In Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.), Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press. 345.
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  8. Michael V. Lombardo & Simon Baron-Cohen (2011). The Role of the Self in Mindblindness in Autism. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):130-140.
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  9. Simon Baron-Cohen, Emma Ashwin, Chris Ashwin, Teresa Tavassoli & Bhismadev Chakrabarti (2010). Talent in Autism: Hyper-Systemizing, Hyper-Attention to Detail and Sensory Hyper-Sensitivity. In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.
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  10. Patricia Howlin, Simon Baron-Cohen & Julie A. Hadwin, Teaching Children with Autism to Mind-Read: The Workbook. 2Rev Ed Edition.
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  11. Simon Baron-Cohen (2009). The Evolution of Empathizing and Systematizing: Assortative Mating of Two Strong Systematizers and the Cause of Autism. In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oup Oxford.
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  12. Bhismadev Chakrabarti & Simon Baron-Cohen (2008). Can the Shared Circuits Model (SCM) Explain Joint Attention or Perception of Discrete Emotions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):24-25.
    The shared circuits model (SCM) is a bold attempt to explain how humans make sense of action, at different levels. In this commentary we single out five concerns: (1) the lack of a developmental account, (2) the absence of double-dissociation evidence, (3) the neglect of joint attention and joint action, (4) the inability to explain discrete emotion perception, and (5) the lack of predictive power or testability of the model. We conclude that Hurley's model requires further work before it could (...)
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  13. Simon Baron-Cohen, D. Bor, J. Billington, J. Asher, S. Wheelwright & C. Ashwin (2007). Savant Memory in a Man with Colour Form-Number Synaesthesia and Asperger. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (s 9-10):237-251.
    Extreme conditions like savantism, autism or synaesthesia, which have a neurological 2AH, UK basis, challenge the idea that other minds are similar to our own. In this paper we report a single case study of a man in whom all three of these conditions co-occur. We suggest, on the basis of this single case, that when savantism and synaesthesia co- occur, it is worthwhile testing for an undiagnosed Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). This is because savantism has an established association with (...)
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  14. Simon Baron-Cohen, Sally Wheelwright, Amy Burtenshaw & Esther Hobson (2007). Mathematical Talent is Linked to Autism. Human Nature 18 (2):125-131.
    A total of 378 mathematics undergraduates (selected for being strong at “systemizing”) and 414 students in other (control) disciplines at Cambridge University were surveyed with two questions: (1) Do you have a diagnosed autism spectrum condition? (2) How many relatives in your immediate family have a diagnosed autism spectrum condition? Results showed seven cases of autism in the math group (or 1.85%) vs one case of autism in the control group (or 0.24%), a ninefold difference that is significant. Controlling for (...)
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  15. Simon Baron-Cohen (2005). Autism Autos": Literally. In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press.
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  16. Simon Baron-Cohen (2005). Autism–'Autos': Literally, a Total Focus on the Self. In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press. 166--180.
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  17. Simon Baron-Cohen (2003). A Mature View of Autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):380-383.
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  18. Simon Baron-Cohen (2002). The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):248-254.
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  19. Joe Gray, Susan Chopping, Julia Nunn, David Parslow, Lloyd Gregory, Steve Williams, Michael J. Brammer & Simon Baron-Cohen (2002). Implications of Synaesthesia for Functionalism: Theory and Experiments. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (12):5-31.
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  20. Simon Baron-Cohen (2001). Consciousness of the Physical and the Mental: Evidence From Autism. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 61-76.
     
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  21. Simon Baron-Cohen (1999). Can Studies of Autism Teach Us About Consciousness of the Physical and the Mental? Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):175-188.
    Most scientists and theorists concerned with the problem of consciousness focus on our consciousness of the physical world (our sensations, feelings, and awareness). In this paper I consider our consciousness of the mental world (our thoughts about thoughts, intentions, wishes, and emotions).The argument is made that these are two distinct forms of consciousness, the evidence for this deriving from studies of autism. Autism is a severe childhood psychiatric condition in which individuals may be conscious of the physical world but not (...)
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  22. Therese Jolliffe & Simon Baron-Cohen (1999). A Test of Central Coherence Theory: Linguistic Processing in High-Functioning Adults with Autism or Asperger Syndrome: Is Local Coherence Impaired? Cognition 71 (2):149-185.
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  23. Therese Jolliffe & Simon Baron-Cohen (1999). Linguistic Processing in High-Functioning Adults with Autism or Asperger Syndrome: Can Local Coherence Be Achieved? A Test of Central Coherence Theory. Cognition 71:149-185.
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  24. Simon Baron-Cohen (1998). Superiority on the Embedded Figures Test in Autism and in Normal Males: Evidence of an “Innate Talent”? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):408-409.
    Howe et al. suggest that most talents can be explained in terms of practice and other environmental effects, and only exceptionally by innate factors. This commentary provides an illustration of one such exception: performance on the Embedded Figures Test by people with autism and their relatives.
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  25. Simon Baron-Cohen (1996). Can Children with Autism Integrate First and Third Person Representations? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):123.
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  26. Simon Baron-Cohen & John Swettenham (1996). 10 The Relationship Between SAM and ToMM: Two Hypotheses. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 158.
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  27. Simon Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg & D. J. Cohen (1994). Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Autism. Oxford University Press.
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  28. Simon Baron-Cohen (1993). Are Children with Autism Acultural? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):512.
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  29. Simon Baron-Cohen (1993). The Concept of Intentionality: Invented or Innate? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):29.
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  30. Simon Baron-Cohen, Amy Spitz & Pippa Cross (1993). Do Children with Autism Recognise Surprise? A Research Note. Cognition and Emotion 7 (6):507-516.
  31. Simon Baron-Cohen (1992). How Monkeys Do Things with “Words”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):148-149.
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  32. Simon Baron-Cohen & Pippa Cross (1992). Reading the Eyes: Evidence for the Role of Perception in the Development of a Theory of Mind. Mind and Language 7 (1-2):172-186.
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  33. Simon Baron-Cohen (1988). Without a Theory of Mind One Cannot Participate in a Conversation. Cognition 29 (1):83-84.
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  34. Simon Baron-Cohen, Alan M. Leslie & Uta Frith (1985). Does the Autistic Child Have a “Theory of Mind”? Cognition 21 (1):37-46.
    We use a new model of metarepresentational development to predict a cognitive deficit which could explain a crucial component of the social impairment in childhood autism. One of the manifestations of a basic metarepresentational capacity is a ‘theory of mind’. We have reason to believe that autistic children lack such a ‘theory’. If this were so, then they would be unable to impute beliefs to others and to predict their behaviour. This hypothesis was tested using Wimmer and Perner’s puppet play (...)
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