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Simon Blackburn [198]Simon W. Blackburn [7]
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Profile: Simon Blackburn (Cambridge University)
  1. Simon Blackburn (1998). Ruling Passions. Oxford University Press.
    Simon Blackburn puts forward a compelling original philosophy of human motivation and morality. Why do we behave as we do? Can we improve? Is our ethics at war with our passions, or is it an upshot of those passions? Blackburn seeks the answers to such questions in an exploration of the nature of moral emotions and the structures of human motivation. His theory is naturalistic: it integrates our understanding of ethics with the rest of our understanding of the world we (...)
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  2. Simon Blackburn (1984). Spreading the Word. Clarendon Press.
    Provides a comprehensive introduction to the major philosophical theories attempting to explain the workings of language.
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  3. Simon Blackburn (1993). Essays in Quasi-Realism. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects some influential essays in which Simon Blackburn, one of our leading philosophers, explores one of the most profound and fertile of philosophical problems: the way in which our judgments relate to the world. This debate has centered on realism, or the view that what we say is validated by the way things stand in the world, and a variety of oppositions to it. Prominent among the latter are expressive and projective theories, but also a relaxed pluralism that (...)
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  4. Simon Blackburn (2016). The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This bestselling dictionary is written by one of the leading philosophers of our time, and it is widely recognized as the best dictionary of its kind. Comprehensive and authoritative, it covers every aspect of philosophy from Aristotle to Zen. With clear and concise definitions, it provides lively and accessible coverage of not only Western philosophical traditions, but also themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Jewish philosophy. Entries include over 400 biographies of famous and influential philosophers, in-depth analysis of philosophical terms (...)
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  5. Simon Blackburn (2008). The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. Oxford ;Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive and authoritative the Dictionary of Philosophy contains over 2,500 entries, including biographies of nearly 500 influential philosophers. The dictionary provides wide-ranging and lively coverage of not only Western philosophical traditions, but also themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Jewish philosophy. This clear and easy to use reference also contains in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, and a chronology of philosophical events stretching from 10,000 BC to the present day.
     
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  6. Simon Blackburn (2007). Perspectives, Fictions, Errors, Play. In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press 281--96.
     
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  7. Simon Blackburn (2005). Quasi-Realism No Fictionalism. In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press 322--338.
  8. Huw Price, Simon Blackburn, Robert Brandom, Paul Horwich & Michael Williams (2013). Expressivism, Pragmatism and Representationalism. Cambridge University Press.
    Pragmatists have traditionally been enemies of representationalism but friends of naturalism, when naturalism is understood to pertain to human subjects, in the sense of Hume and Nietzsche. In this volume Huw Price presents his distinctive version of this traditional combination, as delivered in his René Descartes Lectures at Tilburg University in 2008. Price contrasts his view with other contemporary forms of philosophical naturalism, comparing it with other pragmatist and neo-pragmatist views such as those of Robert Brandom and Simon Blackburn. Linking (...)
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  9. Simon Blackburn (1998). Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):195-198.
  10. Simon W. Blackburn (1990). Filling in Space. Analysis 50 (2):62-5.
  11. Simon Blackburn (1988). Attitudes and Contents. Ethics 98 (3):501-517.
  12. Simon Blackburn (1993). Essays in Quasi-Realism. Oxford University Press Usa.
    A collection of influential essays of one of our leading philosophers, this book explores one of the most profound and fertile of philosophical problems: the way in which our judgments relate to the world. The essays articulate a fresh alternative to a primitive realist/anti-realist opposition, and their cumulative effect is to yield a new appreciation of the delicacy of the debate in central areas.
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  13. Simon Blackburn (2001). Being Good: An Introduction to Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    From political scandals at the highest levels to inflated repair bills at the local garage, we are seemingly surrounded with unethical behavior, so why should we behave any differently? Why should we go through life anchored down by rules no one else seems to follow? Writing with wit and elegance, Simon Blackburn tackles such questions in this lively look at ethics, highlighting the complications and doubts and troubling issues that spring from the very simple question of how we ought to (...)
     
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  14.  38
    Simon Blackburn (2005). Truth: A Guide. Oxford University Press.
    The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this (...)
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  15. Simon Blackburn (1995). Practical Tortoise Raising. Mind 104 (416):695-711.
    In this paper I am not so much concerned with movements of the mind, as movements of the will. But my question bears a similarity to that of the tortoise. I want to ask whether the will is under the control of fact and reason, combined. I shall try to show that there is always something else, something that is not under the control of fact and reason, which has to be given as a brute extra, if deliberation is ever (...)
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  16. Simon W. Blackburn (1984). The Individual Strikes Back. Synthese 58 (March):281-302.
  17. Simon Blackburn (1988). How to Be an Ethical Antirealist. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):361-375.
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  18. Simon Blackburn (1985). Errors and the Phenomenology of Value. In Ted Honderich (ed.), Morality and Objectivity. Routledge & Kegan Paul
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  19.  54
    Simon Blackburn (1973). Reason and Prediction. London,Cambridge University Press.
    An original study of the philosophical problems associated with inductive reasoning. Like most of the main questions in epistemology, the classical problem of induction arises from doubts about a mode of inference used to justify some of our most familiar and pervasive beliefs. The experience of each individual is limited and fragmentary, yet the scope of our beliefs is much wider; and it is the relation between belief and experience, in particular the belief that the future will in some respects (...)
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  20. Simon Blackburn (2009). Truth and A Priori Possibility: Egan's Charge Against Quasi-Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):201-213.
    In this journal Andy Egan argued that, contrary to what I have claimed, quasi-realism is committed to a damaging asymmetry between the way a subject regards himself and the way he regards others. In particular, a subject must believe it to be a priori that if something is one of his stable or fundamental beliefs, then it is true. Whereas he will not hold that this is a priori true of other people. In this paper I rebut Egan's argument, and (...)
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  21. Simon Blackburn (1999). Is Objective Moral Justification Possible on a Quasi-Realist Foundation? Inquiry 42 (2):213 – 227.
    This essay juxtaposes the position in metaethics defended, expressivism with quasirealistic trimmings, with the ancient problem of relativism. It argues that, perhaps surprisingly, there is less of a problem of normative truth on this approach than on others. Because ethics is not in the business of representing aspects of the world, there is no way to argue for a plurality of moral truths, simply from the existence of a plurality of moral opinions. The essay also argues that other approaches, which (...)
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  22. Simon Blackburn (1993). Morals and Modals. In Essays in Quasi-Realism. Oxford University Press
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  23. Simon Blackburn (1980). Opinions and Chances. In D. H. Mellor (ed.), Prospects for Pragmatism. Cambridge University Press 175--96.
     
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  24. Simon Blackburn (1998). Symposium: Realism and Truth. Wittgenstein, Wright, Rorty, Minimalism. Mind 107 (425):157-181.
  25.  7
    Simon Blackburn (2015). Williams, Smith, and the Peculiarity of Piacularity. Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (2):217--232.
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    Simon Blackburn (2013). Can Philosophy Exist? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (sup1):83-105.
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  27.  76
    Simon W. Blackburn (1984). Supervenience Revisited. In Ian Hacking (ed.), Exercises in Analysis: Essays by Students of Casimir Lewy. Cambridge University Press 59--74.
  28.  91
    Simon Blackburn & Keith Simmons (eds.) (1999). Truth. Oxford University Press.
    This volume is designed to set out some of the central issues in the theory of truth. It draws together, for the first time, the debates between philosophers who favor 'robust' or 'substantive' theories of truth, and those other, 'deflationist' or minimalists, who deny that such theories can be given. The editors provide a substantial introduction, in which they look at how the debates relate to further issues, such as the Liar paradox and formal truth theories.
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  29. Simon Blackburn (2001). Reason, Virtue, and Knowledge. In Abrol Fairweather & Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski (eds.), Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility. Oxford University Press 15--29.
     
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  30. Simon Blackburn (2010). The Majesty of Reason. Philosophy 85 (1):5-27.
    In this paper I contemplate two phenomena that have impressed theorists concerned with the domain of reasons and of what is now called ‘normativity’. One is the much-discussed ‘externality’ of reasons. According to this, reasons are just there, anyway. They exist whether or not agents take any notice of them. They do not only exist in the light of contingent desires or mere inclinations. They are ‘external’ not ‘internal’. They bear on us, even when through ignorance or wickedness we take (...)
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  31.  2
    Simon Blackburn (2014). Introduction. In Mirror, Mirror: The Uses and Abuses of Self-Love. Princeton University Press 1-11.
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  32. Simon Blackburn (1971). Moral Realism. In John Casey (ed.), Morality and Moral Reasoning. Methuen
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  33. Simon Blackburn & Alan Code (1978). The Power of Russell's Criticism of Frege: 'On Denoting' Pp. 48-50. Analysis 38 (2):65 - 77.
    The paper analyzes the famous passage in "on denoting" where russell appears to be attacking frege's theory of the sense and reference of proper names. We argue that russell's attack has been misinterpreted and unjustly condemned. The strategy is to show what difficulties do genuinely face a two-Part theory, And then to show that it is quite easy to interpret russell as having perceived them.
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  34.  74
    Simon W. Blackburn (1993). Circles, Finks, Smells and Biconditionals. Philosophical Perspectives 7:259-279.
  35. Simon Blackburn (1998). Wittgenstein, Wright, Rorty and Minimalism. Mind 107 (425):157-181.
  36. Simon Blackburn (2011). TPM Essay. The Philosophers' Magazine 52 (52):34-42.
    I think it is a lapse of taste to spend a grown-up life on problems of which people in the office next door, let alone those outside the building, cannot see the point. I rather fear that the so-called semantic or logical problem of vagueness, Professor Williamson’s own showcase example of his compulsory methods, strikes me as like that.
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  37.  40
    Simon Blackburn (2015). Blessed Are the Peacemakers. Philosophical Studies 172 (4):843-853.
    In this paper I explore the points of similarity and difference that distinguish expressivists such as myself from the position known as Cornell realism. I argue that there are considerable overlaps of doctrine, although these doctrines are arrived at in very different ways. I urge that Cornell realism can only benefit by taking on some of the commitments of expressivism.
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  38. Simon Blackburn (2006). Antirealist Expressivism and Quasi-Realism. In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press 146--162.
     
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  39. Simon Blackburn (2005). Success Semantics. In Hallvard Lillehammer & D. H. Mellor (eds.), Ramsey's Legacy. OUP Oxford
     
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  40.  43
    Simon Blackburn (2002). Replies. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):164–176.
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  41. Simon Blackburn (1996). Securing the Nots: Moral Epistemology for the Quasi-Realist. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong Mark Timmons (ed.), Moral Knowledge? New Readings in Moral Epistemology. Oxford University Press 82--100.
     
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  42. Simon Blackburn (2002). Realism: Deconstructing the Debate. Ratio 15 (2):111–133.
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  43. Simon Blackburn (1981). Reply : Rule-Following and Moral Realism. In S. Holtzman & Christopher M. Leich (eds.), Wittgenstein: To Follow a Rule. Routledge 163--87.
     
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  44.  61
    Simon Blackburn (2010). Practical Tortoise Raising: And Other Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Practical philosophy and ethics -- Practical tortise raising -- Truth, beauty, and goodness -- Dilemmas: dithering, plumping, and grief -- Group minds and expressive harm -- Trust, cooperation, and human psychology -- Must we weep for sentimentalism? -- Through thick and thin -- Perspectives, fictions, errors, play -- The steps from doing to saying -- Success semantics -- Wittgenstein's irrealism -- Circles, finks, smells, and biconditionals -- The absolute conception: Putnam vs. Williams -- Julius Caesar and George Berkeley play leapfrog (...)
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  45.  73
    Simon Blackburn (2010). The Steps From Doing to Saying. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (1):1-13.
    In this paper I consider recent developments in neo-pragmatism, and in particular the degree of convergence between such approaches and those placing greater emphasis on truth and truth-makers. I urge that although a global pragmatism has its merits, it by no means closes the space for a more Wittgensteinian, finer-grained, approach to the diversity of functions served by modal, causal, moral, or other modes of thought.
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  46.  44
    Simon Blackburn (1980). Truth, Realism, and the Regulation of Theory. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 5 (1):353-372.
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  47.  7
    Simon Blackburn (1981). Rational Animal? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):331.
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  48. Simon Blackburn (1990). Hume and Thick Connexions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:237-250.
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  49. Simon Blackburn (1997). Has Kant Refuted Parfit? In J. Dancy (ed.), Reading Parfit. Blackwell 180--201.
     
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  50. Simon Blackburn, Human Reasons.
    In this paper I contemplate two phenomena that have impressed theorists concerned with the domain of reasons and of normativity. One is the much-discussed ‘externality’ of reasons. Reasons are just there, anyway. They exist whether or not agents take any notice of them. They do not only exist in the light of contingent desires or mere inclinations. They are ‘external’ not ‘internal’. They bear on us, even when through ignorance or wickedness we take no notice of them. They thus very (...)
     
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