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Profile: Simon Caney (Oxford University)
  1. Simon Caney (2014). Climate Change, Intergenerational Equity and the Social Discount Rate. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (4):320-342.
    Climate change is projected to have very severe impacts on future generations. Given this, any adequate response to it has to consider the nature of our obligations to future generations. This paper seeks to do that and to relate this to the way that inter-generational justice is often framed by economic analyses of climate change. To do this the paper considers three kinds of considerations that, it has been argued, should guide the kinds of actions that one generation should take (...)
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  2. Simon Caney (2014). Two Kinds of Climate Justice: Avoiding Harm and Sharing Burdens. Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (4):125-149.
  3. Simon Caney (2012). Addressing Poverty and Climate Change: The Varieties of Social Engagement. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (2):191-216.
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  4. Simon Caney (2012). Just Emissions. Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (4):255-300.
    This paper examines what would be a fair distribution of the right to emit greenhouse gases. It distinguishes between views that treat the distribution of this right on its own (Isolationist Views) and those that treat it in conjunction with the distribution of other goods (Integrationist Views). The most widely held view treats adopts an Isolationist approach and holds that emission rights should be distributed equally. This paper provides a critique of this 'equal per capita' view, and the isolationist assumptions (...)
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  5. Simon Caney (2011). Humanity, Associations and Global Justice: A Defence of Humanity-Centred Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism. The Monist 94 (4):506-534.
    This paper defends an egalitarian conception of global justice against two kinds of criticism. Many who defend egalitarian principles of justice do so on the basis that all humans are part of a common 'association' of some kind. In this paper I defend the humanity-centred approach which holds that persons should be included within the scope of distributive justice simply because they are fellow human beings. The paper has four substantive sections - the first addresses Andrea Sangiovanni's reciprocity-based argument for (...)
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  6. Simon Caney (2011). Human Rights, Responsibilities, and Climate Change. In Charles R. Beitz & Robert E. Goodin (eds.), Global Basic Rights. Oup Oxford.
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  7. Simon Caney (2011). Justice and the Duties of the Advantaged: A Defence. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (4):543-552.
    In a recent paper in this journal I argued that the distribution of the burdens involved in combating climate change should be determined by a combination of a particular version of the Polluter Pays Principle (PPP) and a particular version of the Ability to Pay Principle. Carl Knight has presented three objections to my analysis. In what follows, I argue that he largely misinterprets my arguments.
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  8. Simon Caney & Derek Bell (2011). Morality and Climate Change. The Monist 94 (3):305-309.
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  9. Simon Caney & Cameron Hepburn (2011). Carbon Trading: Unethical, Unjust and Ineffective? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:201-234.
    Cap-and-trade systems for greenhouse gas emissions are an important part of the climate change policies of the EU, Japan, New Zealand, among others, as well as China (soon). However, concerns have been raised on a variety of ethical grounds about the use of markets to reduce emissions. In this paper we examine three types of concern. The first holds that emissions trading schemes are 'unethical'. We examine five ethical objections. These objections hold that emissions trading is unethical because it: involves (...)
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  10. Simon Caney (2010). Cosmopolitanism. In Duncan Bell (ed.), Ethics and World Politics. Oxford University Press. 146--63.
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  11. Simon Caney (2010). Climate Change and the Duties of the Advantaged. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):203-228.
    Climate change poses grave threats to many people, including the most vulnerable. This prompts the question of who should bear the burden of combating ?dangerous? climate change. Many appeal to the Polluter Pays Principle. I argue that it should play an important role in any adequate analysis of the responsibility to combat climate change, but suggest that it suffers from three limitations and that it needs to be revised. I then consider the Ability to Pay Principle and consider four objections (...)
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  12. Stephen M. Gardiner, Simon Caney, Dale Jamieson & Henry Shue (2010). Climate Ethics: Essential Readings. OUP USA.
    This collection gathers a set of seminal papers from the emerging area of ethics and climate change. Topics covered include human rights, international justice, intergenerational ethics, individual responsibility, climate economics, and the ethics of geoengineering. Climate Ethics is intended to serve as a source book for general reference, and for university courses that include a focus on the human dimensions of climate change. It should be of broad interest to all those concerned with global justice, environmental science and policy, and (...)
     
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  13. Simon Caney (2009). Cosmopolitanism and Justice. In Thomas Christiano & John Philip Christman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 17--387.
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  14. Simon Caney (2009). Climate Change and the Future: Discounting for Time, Wealth, and Risk. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):163-186.
    This paper examines explore the issues of intergenerational equity raised by climate change. A number of different reasons have been suggested as to why current generations may legitimately favor devoting resources to contemporaries rather than to future generations. These - either individually or jointly - challenge the case for combating climate change. In this paper, I distinguish between three different kinds of reason for favoring contemporaries. I argue that none of these arguments is persuasive. My answer in each case appeals (...)
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  15. Simon Caney (2009). Justice and the Distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):125-146.
    The prospect of dangerous climate change requires Humanity to limit the emission of greenhouse gases. This in turn raises the question of how the permission to emit greenhouse gases should be distributed and among whom. In this article the author criticises three principles of distributive justice that have often been advanced in this context. He also argues that the predominantly statist way in which the question is framed occludes some morally relevant considerations. The latter part of the article turns from (...)
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  16. Simon Caney (2007). Global Poverty and Human Rights: The Case for Positive Duties. In Thomas Pogge (ed.), Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right: Who Owes What to the Very Poor? Co-Published with Unesco. Oup Oxford.
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  17. Simon Caney (2007). Justice, Borders and the Cosmopolitan Ideal: A Reply to Two Critics. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):269 – 276.
    (2007). Justice, Borders and the Cosmopolitan Ideal: A Reply to Two Critics. Journal of Global Ethics: Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 269-276. doi: 10.1080/17449620701456178.
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  18. Simon Caney (2006). Cosmopolitan Justice and Institutional Design. Social Theory and Practice 32 (4):725-756.
    What kind of political systems should there be? In this paper I examine two competing principles of institutional design — an instrumental view, which maintains that one should design institutions so as to realize the most plausible conception of justice, and a democratic view, which maintains that one should design institutions so as to enable persons to participate in the decisions that impact their lives. I argue for a mixed view that combines these two principles. In the second stage of (...)
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  19. Simon Caney (2006). Environmental Degradation, Reparations, and the Moral Significance of History. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):464–482.
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  20. Simon Caney (2005). Cosmopolitanism, Democracy and Distributive Justice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy (sup1):29-63.
  21. Simon Caney (2005). Justice Beyond Borders: A Global Political Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Which political principles should govern global politics? In his new book, Simon Caney engages with the work of philosophers, political theorists, and international relations scholars in order to examine some of the most pressing global issues of our time. Are there universal civil, political, and economic human rights? Should there be a system of supra-state institutions? Can humanitarian intervention be justified?
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  22. Alan Apperley, David Archard, Jens Erik Bartelson, Andrea Baumeister, David Boucher, Laura Brace, Gillian Brock, Steve Buckler, Alex Callinicos & Simon Caney (2003). Referees for Volumes 1 and 2 of Contemporary. Contemporary Political Theory 2:267-269.
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  23. Peter Jones & Simon Caney (2003). Introduction: Disagreement and Difference. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (3):1-11.
  24. Simon Caney (2002). Cosmopolitanism and the Law of Peoples. Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (1):95–123.
  25. Simon Caney (2001). British Perspectives on Internationalism, Justice and Sovereignty: From the English School to Cosmopolitan Democracy. The European Legacy 6 (2):265-275.
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  26. Simon Caney (2001). Cosmopolitan Justice and Equalizing Opportunities. Metaphilosophy 32 (1-2):113-134.
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  27. Simon Caney (2001). Review Article: International Distributive Justice. Political Studies 49 (5):974-997.
    The literature on global justice contains a number of distinct approaches. This article identifies and reviews recent work in four commonly found in the literature. First there is an examination of the cosmopolitan contention that distributive principles apply globally. This is followed by three responses to the cosmopolitanism, – the nationalist emphasis on special duties to co-nationals, the society of states claim that principles of global distributive justice violate the independence of states and the realist claim that global justice is (...)
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  28. Simon Caney (2000). Human Rights, Compatibility and Diverse Cultures. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (1):51-76.
  29. Peter Jones & Simon Caney (2000). Introduction. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (1):1-6.
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  30. Simon Caney (1999). Nationality, Distributive Justice and the Use of Force. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):123–138.
  31. Simon Caney (1998). Liberal Legitimacy, Reasonable Disagreement and Justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (3):19-36.
    (1998). Liberal legitimacy, reasonable disagreement and justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 1, Pluralsim and Liberal Neutrality, pp. 19-36. doi: 10.1080/13698239808403246.
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  32. Simon Caney (1997). Self-Government and Secession: The Case of Nations. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):351–372.
  33. Simon Caney (1996). Impartiality and Liberal Neutrality. Utilitas 8 (03):273-.
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  34. Simon Caney (1995). Eric Rakowski, Equal Justice, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1993, Pp. Xii + 385. Utilitas 7 (01):169-.
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  35. Simon Caney (1992). Thomas Nagel's Defence of Liberal Neutrality. Analysis 52 (1):41 - 45.
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  36. Simon Caney (1991). Consequentialist Defences of Liberal Neutrality. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):457-477.
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