15 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Simon J. Handley [12]Simon Handley [2]SimonJ Handley [1]
  1. Dries Trippas, Michael F. Verde, Simon J. Handley, Matthew E. Roser, Nicolas A. McNair & Jonathan St B. T. Evans (2014). Modeling Causal Conditional Reasoning Data Using SDT: Caveats and New Insights. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Aidan Feeney & SimonJ Handley (2011). And Causal Claims. In Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Sarah R. Beck (eds.), Understanding Counterfactuals, Understanding Causation. Oxford University Press. 242.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Rebecca McKenzie, Jonathan St B. T. Evans & Simon J. Handley (2011). Autism and Performance on the Suppression Task: Reasoning, Context and Complexity. Thinking and Reasoning 17 (2):182 - 196.
    In this study both adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing controls were presented with conditional reasoning problems using familiar content. In this task both valid and fallacious conditional inferences that would otherwise be drawn can be suppressed if counterexample cases are brought to mind. Such suppression occurs when additional premises are presented, whose effect is to suggest such counterexample cases. In this study we predicted and observed that this suppression effect was substantially and significantly weaker for autistic (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Rebecca McKenzie, Jonathan St Bt Evans & Simon J. Handley (2011). Autism and Performance on the Suppression Task: Reasoning, Context and Complexity. Thinking and Reasoning 17 (2):182-196.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Stephen E. Newstead, Simon J. Handley & Helen L. Neilens (2011). Effects of Training and Instruction on Analytic and Belief-Based Reasoning Processes. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (1):37-68.
    Two studies are reported which demonstrate that analytic responding on everyday reasoning problems can be increased and bias eliminated after training on the law of large numbers (Fong, Krantz, & Nisbett, 1986). Critical thinking problems involving belief-consistent, neutral, and inconsistent conclusions were presented. Belief bias was eliminated when a written justification of argument strength was elicited. However, belief-based responding was still evident when evaluations of the arguments were elicited using rating scales. This finding demonstrates a dissociation between analytic and belief-based (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Helen L. Neilens, Simon J. Handley & Stephen E. Newstead (2009). Effects of Training and Instruction on Analytic and Belief-Based Reasoning Processes. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (1):37 – 68.
    Two studies are reported which demonstrate that analytic responding on everyday reasoning problems can be increased and bias eliminated after training on the law of large numbers (Fong, Krantz, & Nisbett, 1986). Critical thinking problems involving belief-consistent, neutral, and inconsistent conclusions were presented. Belief bias was eliminated when a written justification of argument strength was elicited. However, belief-based responding was still evident when evaluations of the arguments were elicited using rating scales. This finding demonstrates a dissociation between analytic and belief-based (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jonathan StB. T. Evans, Helen Neilens, Simon J. Handley & David E. Over (2008). When Can We Say 'If'? Cognition 108 (1):100-116.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Simon J. Handley & Aidan Feeney (2007). Semifactual: Byrne's Account of Even-If. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):458-459.
    Byrne's approach to the semifactual conditional captures the reasoning data. However, we argue that it does not account for the processes or principles by which people arrive at representations of even-if conditionals, upon which their reasoning is said to be based. Drawing upon recent work on the suppositional conditional we present such an account.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Stephen E. Newstead, Peter Bradon, Simon J. Handley, Ian Dennis & Jonathan St B. T. Evans (2006). Predicting the Difficulty of Complex Logical Reasoning Problems. Thinking and Reasoning 12 (1):62 – 90.
    The aim of the present research was to develop a difficulty model for logical reasoning problems involving complex ordered arrays used in the Graduate Record Examination. The approach used involved breaking down the problems into their basic cognitive elements such as the complexity of the rules used, the number of mental models required to represent the problem, and question type. Weightings for these different elements were derived from two experimental studies and from the reasoning literature. Based on these weights, difficulty (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Simon J. Handley, A. Capon, M. Beveridge, I. Dennis & J. St B. T. Evans (2004). : Working Memory, Inhibitory Control and the Development of Children's Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 10 (2):175-195.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Alison Bacon, Simon Handley & Stephen Newstead (2003). Individual Differences in Strategies for Syllogistic Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 9 (2):133 – 168.
    Current theories of reasoning such as mental models or mental logic assume a universal cognitive mechanism that underlies human reasoning performance. However, there is evidence that this is not the case, for example, the work of Ford (1995), who found that some people adopted predominantly spatial and some verbal strategies in a syllogistic reasoning task. Using written and think-aloud protocols, the present study confirmed the existence of these individual differences. However, in sharp contrast to Ford, the present study found few (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alison Capon, Simon Handley & Ian Dennis (2003). Working Memory and Reasoning: An Individual Differences Perspective. Thinking and Reasoning 9 (3):203 – 244.
    This article reports three experiments that investigated the relationship between working memory capacity and syllogistic and five-term series spatial inference. A series of complex and simple verbal and spatial working memory measures were employed. Correlational analyses showed that verbal and spatial working memory span tasks consistently predicted syllogistic and spatial reasoning performance. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that three factors best accounted for the data--a verbal, a spatial, and a general factor. Syllogistic reasoning performance loaded all three factors, whilst spatial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jonathan St B. T. Evans, Simon J. Handley, Nick Perham, David E. Over & Valerie A. Thompson (2000). Frequency Versus Probability Formats in Statistical Word Problems. Cognition 77 (3):197-213.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jonathan StB. T. Evans, Simon J. Handley, Nick Perham, David E. Over & Valerie A. Thompson (2000). Frequency Versus Probability Formats in Statistical Word Problems. Cognition 77 (3):197-213.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Simon J. Handley & Jonathan St B. T. Evans (2000). Supposition and Representation in Human Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 6 (4):273 – 311.
    We report the results of three experiments designed to assess the role of suppositions in human reasoning. Theories of reasoning based on formal rules propose that the ability to make suppositions is central to deductive reasoning. Our first experiment compared two types of problem that could be solved by a suppositional strategy. Our results showed no difference in difficulty between problems requiring affirmative or negative suppositions and very low logical solution rates throughout. Further analysis of the error data showed a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation