6 found
  1. Julian W. Fernando, Yoshihisa Kashima & Simon M. Laham (forthcoming). Alternatives to the Fixed-Set Model: A Review of Appraisal Models of Emotion. [REVIEW] Cognition and Emotion:1-14.
  2.  5
    Simon M. Laham, Adam L. Alter & Geoffrey P. Goodwin (2009). Easy on the Mind, Easy on the Wrongdoer: Discrepantly Fluent Violations Are Deemed Less Morally Wrong. Cognition 112 (3):462-466.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  3.  3
    Simon M. Laham, Yoshihisa Kashima, Jennifer Dix, Melissa Wheeler & Bianca Levis (2014). Elaborated Contextual Framing is Necessary for Action-Based Attitude Acquisition. Cognition and Emotion 28 (6):1119-1126.
  4.  3
    Hanne M. Watkins & Simon M. Laham (forthcoming). An Investigation of the Use of Linguistic Probes “by” and “in Order to” in Assessing Moral Grammar. Thinking and Reasoning:1-15.
    ABSTRACTProponents of the linguistic analogy suggest that methodologies originally developed for investigating linguistic grammar can also be fruitfully applied to the empirical study of moral grammar: the causal and intentional representations of moral events which – according to the linguistic analogy – drive moral judgements. In the current study, we put this claim to the empirical test. Participants were presented with moral dilemmas which previously have been shown to implement a central principle in moral judgements: the principle of double effect. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography  
  5.  28
    Joseph P. Forgas, Kipling D. Williams & Simon M. Laham (eds.) (2004). Social Motivation: Conscious and Unconscious Processes. Cambridge University Press.
    Ground-breaking research by leading international researchers on the nature, functions and characteristics of social motivation.
    Direct download  
    Export citation  
    My bibliography  
  6. Simon M. Laham, Yoshihisa Kashima, Jennifer Dix & Melissa Wheeler (2015). A Meta-Analysis of the Facilitation of Arm Flexion and Extension Movements as a Function of Stimulus Valence. Cognition and Emotion 29 (6):1069-1090.