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  1. Simon Oliver (2013). Teleology Revived? Cooperation and the Ends of Nature. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):158-165.
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  2. Simon Oliver (2009). Radical Orthodoxy : From Participation to Later Modernity. In Simon Oliver & John Milbank (eds.), The Radical Orthodoxy Reader. Routledge.
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  3. Simon Oliver (2009). Wisdom and Belief in Theology and Philosophy. In John Cornwell & Michael McGhee (eds.), Philosophers and God: At the Frontiers of Faith and Reason. Continuum.
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  4. Simon Oliver & John Milbank (eds.) (2009). The Radical Orthodoxy Reader. Routledge.
     
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  5. Simon Oliver (2005). Philosophy, God, and Motion. Routledge.
    In the post-Newtonian world motion is assumed to be a simple category which relates to the locomotion of bodies in space, and is usually associated only with physics. Philosophy, God and Motion shows that this is a relatively recent understanding of motion and that prior to the scientific revolution motion was a much broader and more mysterious category, applying to moral as well as physical movements. Simon Oliver presents fresh interpretations of key figures in the history of western thought (...)
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  6. Simon Oliver (2004). Robert Grosseteste on Light, Truth and Experimentum. Vivarium 42 (2):151-180.
  7. Simon Oliver (2001). Motion According to Aquinas and Newton. Modern Theology 17 (2):163-199.
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  8. Simon Oliver (1999). Theology as a Pseudo-Ecology? Reply to Manussos Marangudakis. Telos 1999 (115):95-109.
    Manussos Marangudakis traces the roots of environmental concern within both Left and Right political thought.1 He examines the anti-technological and occasionally authoritarian stances of Hamsun, Williamson, Haeckel and Heidegger, and their associations with National Socialism, and compares them to the more recent ideologies of Deep Ecology, Ecofeminism, Eco-Socialism and Social Ecology, and their politics of egalitarianism, equality and autonomy. He concludes that, insofar as ecologists have opted for nature as the prominent pole in the nature and culture divide, their politics (...)
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  9. Simon Oliver (1999). The Eucharist Before Nature and Culture. Modern Theology 15 (3):331-353.
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  10. Simon Oliver (1998). The Theodicy of Austin Farrer. Heythrop Journal 39 (3):280–297.
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