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  1. Simon P. James (2014). “Nothing Truly Wild is Unclean”: Muir, Misanthropy, and the Aesthetics of Dirt. Environmental Ethics 36 (3):357-363.
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  2. Simon P. James (2013). Cherished Places and Ecosystem Services. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):264-266.
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  3. Simon P. James (2013). Finding - and Failing to Find - Meaning in Nature. Environmental Values 22 (5):609-625.
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  4. Simon P. James (2013). Philistinism and the Preservation of Nature. Philosophy 88 (01):101-114.
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  5. Simon P. James (2011). For the Sake of a Stone? Inanimate Things and the Demands of Morality. Inquiry 54 (4):384-397.
    Abstract Everyday inanimate things such as stones, teapots and bicycles are not objects to which moral agents could have direct duties; they do not have moral status. It is usually assumed that there is therefore no reason to think that a morally good person would, on account of her goodness, be disposed to treat them well for their own sakes. I challenge this assumption. I begin by showing that to act for the sake of an entity need not be to (...)
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  6. Simon P. James (2009). Phenomenology and the Problem of Animal Minds. Environmental Values 18 (1):33 - 49.
    Attempts to determine whether nonhuman animals have minds are often thought to raise a particular sceptical concern; I call it the problem of animal minds. If there are such things as animal minds, the sceptic reasons, they will be private realms to which we humans do not have direct epistemological access. So how could one ever know for certain that animals are not mindless mechanisms? In this paper I use a phenomenological approach to show that this familiar sceptical problem presupposes (...)
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  7. Simon P. James (2009). The Presence of Nature: A Study in Phenomenology and Environmental Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  8. Simon P. James (2007). Against Holism: Rethinking Buddhist Environmental Ethics. Environmental Values 16 (4):447 - 461.
    Environmental thinkers sympathetic to Buddhism sometimes reason as follows: (1) A holistic view of the world, according to which humans are regarded as being 'one' with nature, will necessarily engender environmental concern; (2) the Buddhist teaching of 'emptiness' represents such a view; therefore (3) Buddhism is an environmentally-friendly religion. In this paper, I argue that the first premise of this argument is false (a holistic view of the world can be reconciled with a markedly eco-unfriendly attitude) as is the second (...)
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  9. Simon P. James (2007). Merleau-Ponty, Metaphysical Realism and the Natural World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):501 – 519.
    Environmental thinkers often suppose that the natural world (or some parts of it, at least) exists in its own right, independent of human concerns. The arguments developed in this paper suggest that it is possible to do justice to this thought without endorsing some form of metaphysical realism. Thus the early sections look to Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception to develop an anti-realist account of the independent reality of the natural world, one, it is argued, that has certain advantages over the (...)
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  10. Simon P. James (2006). Buddhism and the Ethics of Species Conservation. Environmental Values 15 (1):85 - 97.
    Efforts to conserve endangered species of animal are, in some important respects, at odds with Buddhist ethics. On the one hand, being abstract entities, species cannot suffer, and so cannot be proper objects of compassion or similar moral virtues. On the other, Buddhist commitments to equanimity tend to militate against the idea that the individual members of endangered species have greater value than those of less-threatened ones. This paper suggests that the contribution of Buddhism to the issue of species conservation (...)
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  11. Simon P. James (2006). Human Virtues and Natural Values. Environmental Ethics 28 (4):339-353.
    In several works, Holmes Rolston, III has argued that a satisfactory environmental ethic cannot be built on a virtue ethical foundation. His first argument amounts to the charge that because virtue ethics is by nature “self-centered” or egoistic, it is also inherently “human-centered” and hence ill suited to treating environmental matters. According to his second argument, virtue ethics is perniciously human-centeredsince it “locates” the value of a thing, not in the thing itself, but in the agent who is “ennobled” by (...)
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  12. Simon P. James (2003). Zen Buddhism and the Intrinsic Value of Nature. Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2):143-157.
    It is a perennial theme in the literature on environmental ethics that the exploitation of the environment is the result of a blindness to (or perhaps a refusal to recognize) the intrinsic value of natural beings. The general story here is that Western traditions of thought have tended to accord natural beings value only to the extent that they prove useful to humans, that they have tended to see nature as only instrumentally valuable. By contrast, it is said that a (...)
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  13. Simon P. James (2001). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics by Peter Harvey Cambridge University Press, 2000, Pp. XX + 478. Philosophy 76 (1):158-174.
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  14. Simon P. James (2000). “Thing-Centered” Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):359-375.
    I address the problem of reconciling environmental holism with the intrinsic value of individual beings. Drawing upon Madhyamaka (“middle way”) Buddhism, the later philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and deep ecology, I present a distinctly holistic conception of nature that, nevertheless, retains a commitment to the intrinsic worth of individual beings. I conclude with an examination of the practical implications of this “thing-centered holism” for environmental ethics.
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