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Profile: Simon Rippon (Central European University)
  1. Simon Rippon (forthcoming). Were Kant's Hypothetical Imperatives Wide-Scope Oughts? Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    I defend the claim that Kant held a wide-scope view of hypothetical imperatives against objections raised by Mark Shroeder [2005]. There is an important objection, now commonly known as the ‘bootstrapping’ problem, to the alternative, narrow-scope, view which Schroeder attributes to Kant. Schroeder argues that Kant has sufficient resources to reply to the bootstrapping problem, and claims this leaves us with no good reason to attribute to Kant the wide-scope view. I show that Schroeder’s Kantian reply to the bootstrapping problem (...)
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  2. Simon Rippon (2014). Imposing Options on People in Poverty: The Harm of a Live Donor Organ Market. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):145-150.
    A prominent defence of a market in organs from living donors says that if we truly care about people in poverty, we should allow them to sell their organs. The argument is that if poor vendors would have voluntarily decided to sell their organs in a free market, then prohibiting them from selling makes them even worse off, at least from their own perspective, and that it would be unconscionably paternalistic to substitute our judgements for individuals' own judgements about what (...)
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  3. Simon Rippon (2014). Organ Markets and Harms: A Reply to Dworkin, Radcliffe Richards and Walsh. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):155-156.
  4. Simon Rippon (2012). How to Reverse the Organ Shortage. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (4):344-358.
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  5. Simon Rippon (2011). In Defense of the Wide-Scope Instrumental Principle. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 5 (2):1-21.
    I make the observation that English sentences such as “You have reason to take the bus or to take the train” do not have the logical form that they superficially appear to have. I find in these sentences a conjunctive use of “or,” as found in sentences like “You can have milk or lemon in your tea,” which gives you a permission to have milk, and a permission to have lemon, though no permission to have both. I argue that a (...)
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  6. Simon Rippon, Pablo Stafforini, Katrien Devolder, Russell Powell & Thomas Douglas (2010). Resisting Sparrow's Sexy Reductio : Selection Principles and the Social Good. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):16-18.
    Principles of procreative beneficence (PPBs) hold that parents have good reasons to select the child with the best life prospects. Sparrow (2010) claims that PPBs imply that we should select only female children, unlesswe attach normative significance to “normal” human capacities. We argue that this claim fails on both empirical and logical grounds. Empirically, Sparrow’s argument for greater female wellbeing rests on a selective reading of the evidence and the incorrect assumption that an advantage for females would persist even when (...)
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