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  1. Simon Shimshon Rubin (2011). Psychological Ethics in Israel: Riding the Winds of Fashion to Guide Transformative Changes. Ethics and Behavior 20 (3):265-276.
    This article offers a narrative dimension to the evolution of professional ethics in psychology in Israel. The similarities and differences with ethics in the United States frame the discussion. The author's viewpoint and involvement in promoting ethics in academic and professional settings opens the article. This is followed by consideration of the licensing of the profession in 1977, and the ethics requirements that followed. Cultural developments that influenced Israeli society in the direction of greater individual autonomy and disillusionment with paternalism (...)
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  2. Gerald P. Koocher, Thomas G. Plante, James M. DuBois, Simon Shimshon Rubin, Armin Paul Thies & Mary Marple Thies (2004). Colloquy. Ethics and Behavior 14 (1):65-87.
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  3. Gerald P. Koocher, Thomas G. Plante, James M. DuBois, Simon Shimshon Rubin, Armin Paul Thies & Mary Marple Thies (2004). Colloquy: Introduction. Ethics and Behavior 14 (1):65 – 87.
    This article examines the clergy sexual abuse crisis in the Roman Catholic Church from an ethical point of view. The article uses the RRICC values model of ethical decision making (i.e., responsibility, respect, integrity, competence, concern) to review the behavior of Catholic bishops and other religious superiors as they have tried to manage clergy sex offenders and their victims. Hopefully, the recent press attention and resulting policy changes on these matters from the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops will increase the (...)
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  4. Simon Shimshon Rubin (2004). Why Was I Not My Brother's Keeper-or My Own. Ethics and Behavior 14 (1):77-82.
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  5. Susan Douglas Kelley, Sondra Crosby, Michael A. Grodin, Ruth Macklin, Simon Shimshon Rubin, Fern Brunger & Charles Weijer (2002). The Forum. Ethics and Behavior 12 (4):371 – 387.
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  6. Simon Shimshon Rubin (2000). Book Review. [REVIEW] Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):195 – 197.
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  7. Simon Shimshon Rubin & Danah Amir (2000). When Expertise and Ethics Diverge: Lay and Professional Evaluation of Psychotherapists in Israel. Ethics and Behavior 10 (4):375 – 391.
    Do psychotherapists' unethical practices influence how they are perceived? The 202 Israeli lay and professional psychology participants rated systematically varied descriptions of effective therapists and potential clients under conditions of no difficulties (standard), practice without a license, and a previous sexual boundary violation on indexes of evaluation and willingness to refer. Participants completed a measure of important variables in therapist selection. Effective standard therapists were rated most favorably, unlicensed therapists were rated favorably, and therapists who violated sexual boundaries in the (...)
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  8. Simon Shimshon Rubin & Omer Dror (1996). Professional Ethics of Psychologists and Physicians: Mortality, Confidentiality, and Sexuality in Israel. Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):213 – 238.
    Clinical psychologists' and nonpsychiatric physicians' attitudes and behaviors in sexual and confidentiality boundary violations were examined. The 171 participants' responses were analyzed by profession, sex, and status (student, resident, professional) on semantic differential, boundary violation vignettes, and a version of Pope, Tabachnick, and Keith-Spiegel's (1987) ethical scale. Psychologists rated sexual boundary violation as more unethical than did physicians (p<.001). Rationale (p<.01) and timing (p<.001) influenced ratings. Psychologists reported fewer sexualized behaviors than physicians (p<05). Professional experience (p<.01) and sex (p<.05) were (...)
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