Search results for 'Simon W. Saunders' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  42
    Simon W. Saunders (1992). Locality, Complex Numbers, and Relativistic Quantum Theory. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:365 - 380.
    A heuristic comparison is made of relativistic and non-relativistic quantum theory. To this end the Segal approach is described for the non-specialist. The significance of antimatter to the local and microcausal properties of the fields is laid bare. The fundamental difference between relativistic and non-relativistic (complex) fields is traced to the existence of two kinds of complex numbers in the relativistic case. Their relation to covariant and Newton-Wigner locality is formulated.
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  2. Simon W. Saunders, Incongruent Counterparts; a Leibnizian Approach.
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  3.  84
    Simon Saunders & David Wallace (2008). Saunders and Wallace Reply. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):315-317.
    A reply to a comment by Paul Tappenden (BJPS 59 (2008) pp. 307-314) on S. Saunders and D. Wallace, "Branching and Uncertainty" (BJPS 59 (2008) pp. 298-306).
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  4.  1
    Thomas W. Simon (1995). Democracy and Social Injustice: Law, Politics, and Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this truly interdisciplinary study that reflects the author's work in philosophy, political science, law, and policy studies, Thomas W. Simon argues that democratic theory must address the social injustices inflicted upon disadvantaged groups. By shifting theoretical sights from justice to injustice, Simon recasts the nature of democracy and provides a new perspective on social problems. He examines the causes and effects of injustice, victims' responses to injustice, and historical theories of disadvantage, revealing that those theories have important (...)
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  5.  4
    J. L. Saunders (1964). W. K. C. Guthrie, "A History of Greek Philosophy", Volume I. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (1):85.
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  6.  14
    Trevor J. Saunders (1988). Epicurus' Swerve W. G. Englert: Epicurus on the Swerve and Voluntary Action. (American Philological Association: American Classical Studies, 16.) Pp. X + 215; 5 Diagrams in the Text. Atlanta, Georgia: Scholars Press, 1987. $21.95 (Members, $15), Paper, $12.95 (Members, $9). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):284-286.
  7.  11
    J. H. Simon (1962). Caesar's Gallic War C. Iulii Caesaris Commentarii de Bello Gallico. Erklärt F. Von Kraner W. Dittenberger H. Meusel. 18. Auflage. Nachwort Und Bibliographische Nachträge von Hans Oppermann. 3 Vols. Pp. Vii+533, Vi+696, 234; 3 Tables, 1 Map. Berlin: Weidmann, 1960. Cloth, DM. 37, 39, 18. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 12 (02):148-150.
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  8. J. De C. M. Saunders (1943). William Henry Welch and the Heroic Age of American Medicine by Simon Flexner; James Thomas Flexner. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 34:381-382.
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  9. M. Simon (1940). DURANT W. - Histoire de la civilisation. [REVIEW] Scientia 34 (67):130.
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  10. J. Simon (1975). W. Hogrebe, Kant und das Problem einer transzendentalen Semantik. Kant-Studien 66 (1-4).
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  11. R. Simon (1979). W. N. Borjas/E. F. Solopow: Filossofskije woprossy chimii. [REVIEW] Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 27 (2):268.
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  12. Simon Saunders (1998). Time, Quantum Mechanics, and Probability. Synthese 114 (3):373-404.
    A variety of ideas arising in decoherence theory, and in the ongoing debate over Everett's relative-state theory, can be linked to issues in relativity theory and the philosophy of time, specifically the relational theory of tense and of identity over time. These have been systematically presented in companion papers (Saunders 1995; 1996a); in what follows we shall consider the same circle of ideas, but specifically in relation to the interpretation of probability, and its identification with relations in the Hilbert (...)
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  13. Simon Saunders (1998). Time, Quantum Mechanics, and Probability. Synthese 114 (3):373-404.
    A variety of ideas arising in decoherence theory, and in the ongoing debate over Everett's relative-state theory, can be linked to issues in relativity theory and the philosophy of time, specifically the relational theory of tense and of identity over time. These have been systematically presented in companion papers (Saunders 1995; 1996a); in what follows we shall consider the same circle of ideas, but specifically in relation to the interpretation of probability, and its identification with relations in the Hilbert (...)
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  14. Robert W. Bradnock & Patricia L. Saunders (2000). Sea-Level Rise, Subsidence and Submergence : The Political Ecology of Environmental Change in the Bengal Delta. In Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.), Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press 66.
     
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  15. W. Simon (1990). «Denn um was wir in der rechten Weise bitten sollen, wissen wir nicht»(Röm 8, 26). Wissenschaft Und Weisheit 53 (1):1-18.
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  16.  37
    Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) (2010). Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. Oxford University Press.
    These are the questions which an illustrious team of philosophers and physicists debate in this volume.
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  17. Simon Saunders (2006). Are Quantum Particles Objects? Analysis 66 (289):52–63.
    Particle indistinguishability has always been considered a purely quantum mechanical concept. In parallel, indistinguishable particles have been thought to be entities that are not properly speaking objects at all. I argue, to the contrary, that the concept can equally be applied to classical particles, and that in either case particles may (with certain exceptions) be counted as objects even though they are indistinguishable. The exceptions are elementary bosons (for example photons).
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  18.  51
    F. A. Muller & Simon Saunders (2008). Discerning Fermions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):499-548.
    We demonstrate that the quantum-mechanical description of composite physical systems of an arbitrary number of similar fermions in all their admissible states, mixed or pure, for all finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, is not in conflict with Leibniz's Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles (PII). We discern the fermions by means of physically meaningful, permutation-invariant categorical relations, i.e. relations independent of the quantum-mechanical probabilities. If, indeed, probabilistic relations are permitted as well, we argue that similar bosons can also be discerned in all (...)
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  19.  48
    Simon Saunders & F. A. Muller (2008). Discerning Fermions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):499 - 548.
    We demonstrate that the quantum-mechanical description of composite physical systems of an arbitrary number of similar fermions in all their admissible states, mixed or pure, for all finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, is not in conflict with Leibniz's Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles (PII). We discern the fermions by means of physically meaningful, permutation-invariant categorical relations, i.e. relations independent of the quantum-mechanical probabilities. If, indeed, probabilistic relations are permitted as well, we argue that similar bosons can also be discerned in all (...)
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  20.  76
    Simon Saunders (2003). Physics and Leibniz's Principles. In Katherine Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.), Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections. Cambridge University Press 289--307.
    It is shown that the Hilbert-Bernays-Quine principle of identity of indiscernibles applies uniformly to all the contentious cases of symmetries in physics, including permutation symmetry in classical and quantum mechanics. It follows that there is no special problem with the notion of objecthood in physics. Leibniz's principle of sufficient reason is considered as well; this too applies uniformly. But given the new principle of identity, it no longer implies that space, or atoms, are unreal.
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  21. Simon Saunders & D. Wallace (2008). Branching and Uncertainty. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):293-305.
    Following Lewis, it is widely held that branching worlds differ in important ways from diverging worlds. There is, however, a simple and natural semantics under which ordinary sentences uttered in branching worlds have much the same truth values as they conventionally have in diverging worlds. Under this semantics, whether branching or diverging, speakers cannot say in advance which branch or world is theirs. They are uncertain as to the outcome. This same semantics ensures the truth of utterances typically made about (...)
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  22. Simon Saunders (forthcoming). What is Probability? Arxiv Preprint Quant-Ph/0412194.
    Probabilities may be subjective or objective; we are concerned with both kinds of probability, and the relationship between them. The fundamental theory of objective probability is quantum mechanics: it is argued that neither Bohr's Copenhagen interpretation, nor the pilot-wave theory, nor stochastic state-reduction theories, give a satisfactory answer to the question of what objective probabilities are in quantum mechanics, or why they should satisfy the Born rule; nor do they give any reason why subjective probabilities should track objective ones. But (...)
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  23.  55
    Simon Saunders, Derivation of the Born Rule From Operational Assumptions.
    The Born rule is derived from operational assumptions, together with assumptions of quantum mechanics that concern only the deterministic development of the state. Unlike Gleason’s theorem, the argument applies even if probabilities are de…ned for only a single resolution of the identity, so it applies to a variety of foundational approaches to quantum mechanics. It also provides a probability rule for state spaces that are not Hilbert spaces.
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  24.  30
    Simon Saunders (2013). Rethinking Newton'sPrincipia. Philosophy of Science 80 (1):22-48.
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  25.  63
    Simon Saunders (1995). Time, Quantum Mechanics, and Decoherence. Synthese 102 (2):235 - 266.
    State-reduction and the notion of actuality are compared to passage through time and the notion of the present; already in classical relativity the latter give rise to difficulties. The solution proposed here is to treat both tense and value-definiteness as relational properties or facts as relations; likewise the notions of change and probability. In both cases essential characteristics are absent: temporal relations are tenselessly true; probabilistic relations are deterministically true.The basic ideas go back to Everett, although the technical development makes (...)
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  26. Simon Saunders (2003). Structural Realism, Again. Synthese 136 (1):127 - 133.
    The paper defends a view of structural realism similar to that of French and Ladyman, although it differs from theirs in an important respect: I do not take indistinguishabiity of particles in quantum mechanics to have the significance they think it has. It also differs from Cao's view of structural realism, criticized in my "Critical Notice: Cao's `The Conceptual Development of 20th Century Field Theories".
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  27. Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) (2010). Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory & Reality. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What would it mean to apply quantum theory, without restriction and without involving any notion of measurement and state reduction, to the whole universe? What would realism about the quantum state then imply? This book brings together an illustrious team of philosophers and physicists to debate these questions. The contributors broadly agree on the need, or aspiration, for a realist theory that unites micro- and macro-worlds. But they disagree on what this implies. Some argue that if unitary quantum evolution has (...)
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  28.  99
    Simon Saunders (2003). Structural Realism, Again. Synthese 136 (1):127-133.
    The paper defends a view of structural realism similar to that of French and Ladyman, although it differs from theirs in an important respect: I do not take indistinguishabiity of particles in quantum mechanics to have the significance they think it has. It also differs from Cao's view of structural realism, criticized in my "Critical Notice: Cao's `The Conceptual Development of 20th Century Field Theories".
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  29. Simon Saunders (2010). Chance in the Everett Interpretation. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. OUP Oxford
  30.  10
    Simon Saunders (1993). Decoherence, Relative States, and Evolutionary Adaptation. Foundations of Physics 23 (12):1553-1585.
    We review the decoherent histories approach to the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The Everett relative-state theory is reformulated in terms of decoherent histories. A model of evolutionary adaptation is shown to imply decoherence. A general interpretative framework is proposed: probability and value-definiteness are to have a similar status to the attribution of tense in classical spacetime theory.
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  31.  92
    Simon Saunders (2003). Critical Notice: Tian Yu Cao's “the Conceptual Development of 20th Century Field Theories”. [REVIEW] Synthese 136 (1):79-105.
    Tian Yu Cao has written a serious and scholarly book covering a great deal of physics. He ranges from classical relativity theory, both special and general, to relativistic quantum …eld theory, including non-Abelian gauge theory, renormalization theory, and symmetry-breaking, presenting a detailed and very rich picture of the mainstream developments in quantum physics; a remarkable feat. It has, moreover, a philosophical message: according to Cao, the development of these theories is inconsistent with a Kuhnian view of theory change, and supports (...)
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  32.  66
    Simon Saunders (2002). How Relativity Contradicts Presentism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 50:277-.
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  33.  88
    Simon Saunders (2006). On the Explanation for Quantum Statistics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (1):192-211.
    The concept of classical indistinguishability is analyzed and defended against a number of well-known criticisms, with particular attention to the Gibbs’paradox. Granted that it is as much at home in classical as in quantum statistical mechanics, the question arises as to why indistinguishability, in quantum mechanics but not in classical mechanics, forces a change in statistics. The answer, illustrated with simple examples, is that the equilibrium measure on classical phase space is continuous, whilst on Hilbert space it is discrete. The (...)
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  34. Simon Saunders (1995). Time, Decoherence and Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 102 (2):235-266.
  35.  45
    A. N. W. Saunders (1965). Books Reviews. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1):101-102.
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  36.  53
    Simon Saunders (1996). Time, Quantum Mechanics, and Tense. Synthese 107 (1):19 - 53.
    The relational approach to tense holds that the now, passage, and becoming are to be understood in terms of relations between events. The debate over the adequacy of this framework is illustrated by a comparative study of the sense in which physical theories, (in)deterministic and (non)relativistic, can lend expression to the metaphysics at issue. The objective is not to settle the matter, but to clarify the nature of this metaphysics and to establish that the same issues are at stake in (...)
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  37.  27
    Simon Saunders (1997). Naturalizing Metaphysics. The Monist 80 (1):44-69.
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  38.  6
    Simon Saunders (2003). Indiscernibles, General Covariance, and Other Symmetries: The Case for Non-Reductive Relationalsm. In A. Ashtekar (ed.), Revisiting the Foundations of Relativistic Physics. 151--173.
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  39.  32
    Simon Saunders (1993). To What Physics Corresponds. In S. French & H. Kamminga (eds.), Correspondence, Invariance and Heuristics. Kluwer 295--325.
  40.  69
    Simon Saunders (2002). Indiscernibles, General Covariance, and Other Symmetries. In Abhay Ashtekar, Jürgen Renn, Don Howard, Abner Shimony & S. Sarkar (eds.), Revisiting the Foundations of Relativistic Physics. Festschrift in Honour of John Stachel. Kluwer
    What is the meaning of general covariance? We learn something about it from the hole argument, due originally to Einstein. In his search for a theory of gravity, he noted that if the equations of motion are covariant under arbitrary coordinate transformations, then particle coordinates at a given time can be varied arbitrarily - they are underdetermined - even if their values at all earlier times are held fixed. It is the same for the values of fields. The argument can (...)
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  41.  31
    Herbert A. Simon, Patrick W. Langley & Gary L. Bradshaw (1981). Scientific Discovery as Problem Solving. Synthese 47 (1):3 – 14.
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  42.  30
    Simon Saunders (2005). Complementarity and Scientific Rationality. Foundations of Physics 35 (3):417-447.
    Bohr’s interpretation of quantum mechanics has been criticized as incoherent and opportunistic, and based on doubtful philosophical premises. If so Bohr’s influence, in the pre-war period of 1927–1939, is the harder to explain, and the acceptance of his approach to quantum mechanics over de Broglie’s had no reasonable foundation. But Bohr’s interpretation changed little from the time of its first appearance, and stood independent of any philosophical presuppositions. The principle of complementarity is itself best read as a conjecture of unusually (...)
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  43.  55
    Simon Saunders, Space-Time and Probability.
    Special relativity is most naturally formulated as a theory of spacetime geometry, but within the spacetime framework probability appears to be a purely epistemic notion. It is possible that progress can be made with rather different approaches - covariant stochastic equations, in particular - but the results to date are not encouraging. However, it seems a non-epistemic notion of probability can be made out in Minkowski space on Everett's terms. I shall work throughout with the consistent histories formalism. I shall (...)
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  44. Simon Saunders (1996). Comment on Lockwood. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):241-248.
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  45. Simon Saunders (2000). Tense and Indeterminateness. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):611.
    Is tense real and objective? Can the fact that something is past, say, be wholly objective, consistent with special relativity? The answer is yes, but only so long as the distinction has no ontological ground. There is a closely related question. Is the contrast between the determinate and the indeterminate real and objective, consistent with relativity and quantum mechanics? The answer is again yes, but only if the contrast has no ontological ground. Various accounts of it are explored, according to (...)
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  46. Simon Saunders (1999). Wave Theory. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 71.
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  47.  69
    Simon Saunders (2001). The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds. Jeffrey A. Barrett. Mind 110 (440):1039-1043.
  48.  85
    C. W. Simon & W. Emmons (1956). Consciousness, and Sleep. Science 124:1066-1069.
  49.  4
    Simon Saunders (2003). Tian Yu Cao's "The Conceptual Development of 20th Century Field Theories". Synthese 136 (1):79 - 105.
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  50.  9
    Steven R. Simon, Madeline L. McCarthy, Rainu Kaushal, Chelsea A. Jenter, Lynn A. Volk, Eric G. Poon, Kevin C. Yee, E. John Orav, Deborah H. Williams & David W. Bates (2008). Electronic Health Records: Which Practices Have Them, and How Are Clinicians Using Them? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):43-47.
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