Search results for 'Siobhan Austen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Siobhan Austen & Therese Jefferson (2006). Comparing Responses to Critical Realism. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):257-282.
    This article is a study of the response of two heterodox schools of economic thought to ?new? philosophical ideas. Specifically, it considers the response within Post Keynesian and feminist economics to Tony Lawson's recent call for economists to pay greater attention to ontology and for economists to adopt research methods consistent with critical realism. Lawson's arguments were formally introduced to these schools over the space of a few years and continue to generate considerable discussion within their ranks. The focus of (...)
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  2. Jane Austen (1982). Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen Set. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This complete set of the novels of Jane Austen is now reissued as a shrink-wrapped set with handsome new jackets. Using the definitive text established by R.W. Chapman, with later revisions by distinguished scholars, the set presents the most authoritative and comprehensive edition available - invaluable for students and enthusiasts of Jane Austen's work. Each volume contains notes and appendices, and indexes of characters, and the set is illustrated with a charming selection of early nineteenth-century plates.
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  3.  2
    Alvin S. Bernstein, Kenneth Taylor, Buron G. Austen, Martin Nathanson & Anthony Scarpelli (1971). Orienting Response and Apparent Movement Toward or Away From the Observer. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):37.
  4.  86
    J. Wisdom, J. L. Austen, J. L. Austin & A. J. Ayer (1946). Symposium: Other Minds. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 20 (1):122 - 197.
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  5.  18
    Andrea Austen (1996). A Feminist Reconstruction of Bradley's Ethical Idealism. Idealistic Studies 26 (1):17-28.
    In this paper I defend certain features of F. H. Bradley's moral, and to a lesser extent political, philosophy in the wake of recent feminist critiques of ethics. I attempt to establish congeniality with Bradley's ethical and political theory to current discussions in feminist ethics. Not only is Bradley's idealism consistent with feminist ethics, but it is able to meet several standard feminist objections to traditional moral theory. In spite of making sexist comments characteristic of the nineteenth century, Bradley's ethical-political (...)
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  6. Jane Austen (1963). Sense and Sensibility. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  7. Jane Austen (1963). Pride and Prejudice. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  8. Jane Austen (1963). Emma. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  9.  14
    Andrea Austen (1995). Bradley and Feminist Ethics. Bradley Studies 1 (1):30-44.
  10. Jane Austen (1963). Northanger Abbey and Persuasion. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  11. Jane Austen (1963). Mansfield Park. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  12. Lesley Austen, Bryony Gilbert & Robert Mitchell (1999). Ethics in Practice–Instilling Ethics. Legal Ethics 2 (2):109-112.
     
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  13. Lesley Austen, Bryony Gilbert, Jackie Heath & Robert Mitchell (1998). Lawyers and the Media. Legal Ethics 1 (2):109-116.
     
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  14. J. Wisdom, J. L. Austen, J. L. Austin & A. J. Ayer (1946). Other Minds. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 20:122-197.
     
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  15. Lesley Austen, Bryony Gilbert & Robert Mitchell (2001). Plain English—An Ethical Issue? Legal Ethics 4 (1):5-7.
     
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  16. Brian Austen (1986). Alexander Fenton & Geoffrey Stell, Eds. Loads and Roads in Scotland and Beyond: Road Transport Over 6000 Years. Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd, 1984 Pp. Vii + 144. ISBN 0-85976-107-X £8.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 19 (2):210.
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  17. Lesley Austen, Bryony Gilbert & Robert Mitchell (2000). Editorial—Client Care. Legal Ethics 3 (1):10-13.
     
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  18. Lesley Austen, Bryony Gilbert, Jackie Heath & Robert Mitchell (1999). Ethics in Practice & Modernising Duties. Legal Ethics 2 (1):5-10.
     
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  19. Jane Austen (1963). Minor Works. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  20. Hodges Paul, Schabrun Siobhan, Chipchase Lucy, Vicenzino Bill & Jones Emma (2015). Novel Adaptations in Motor Cortical Maps in Persistent Elbow Pain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  21. Mullally Siobhan (2004). Feminism and Multicultural Dilemmas in India: Revisiting the Shah Bano Case. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 24 (4).
     
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  22. Charles R. Pigden (2012). A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds (...)
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  23.  7
    James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on (...)
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  24. Mohan P. Matthen (2004). Features, Places, and Things: Reflections on Austen Clark's Theory of Sentience. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):497-518.
    The paper argues that material objects are the primary referents of visual states -- not places, as Austen Clark would have it in his A Theory of Sentience.
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  25.  30
    E. M. Dadlez (2009). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the ideas of the other Proposes that ...
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  26.  9
    Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick (1991). Jane Austen and the Masturbating Girl. Critical Inquiry 17 (4):818-837.
    There seems to be something self-evident—irresistibly so, to judge from its gleeful propagation—about the use of the phrase, “Jane Austen and the Masturbating Girl,” as the Q.E.D. of phobic narratives about the degeneracy of academic discourse in the humanities. But what? The narrative link between masturbation itself and degeneracy, though a staple of pre-1920s medical and racial science, no longer has any respectable currency. To the contrary: modern views of masturbation tend to place it firmly in the framework of (...)
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  27.  33
    E. M. Dadlez (2008). Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 315-329.
    What does it mean to hold that the significant aspects of a literary passage cannot be captured in a paraphrase? Does a change in the description of an act "risk producing a different act" from the one described? Using Jane Austen as an example, we'll consider whether her use of metaphor and symbol really amounts to calling someone a prick, whether her narrative voice changes what it is that is expressed, and whether comedy can hold just as much significance (...)
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  28.  17
    James Robert Brown (2007). Siobhan Roberts. King of Infinite Space: Donald Coxeter, the Man Who Saved Geometry. Philosophia Mathematica 15 (3):386-388.
    Donald Coxeter died in 2003, at a ripe old age of 96. Though I had regularly seen him at mathematics talks in Toronto for over twenty years, I never felt rushed to seek him out. It seemed he would go on forever. His death left me regretting my missed opportunity and Siobhan Robert's excellent book makes me regret it even more. Like any good biography of an intellectual, King of Infinite Space contains personal details and mathematical achievements in some (...)
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  29.  4
    Valerie Wainwright (2014). Jane Austen's Challenges, or the Powers of Character and the Understanding. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):58-73.
    “Indulging herself in air and exercise” as she wanders down a lane near the great house of Rosings, Elizabeth Bennet is unaware that she is just about to experience one of her most difficult challenges, and that Mr. Darcy is on his way with his letter.1 Just like present-day personality theorists, Jane Austen manifestly directed a great deal of creative and intellectual energy into devising a great variety of tests. But what are such situations designed to test for? What (...)
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  30.  5
    K. G. White (2009). Jane Austen and Addison's Disease: An Unconvincing Diagnosis. Medical Humanities 35 (2):98-100.
    Jane Austen’s letters describe a two-year deterioration into bed-ridden exhaustion, with unusual colouring, bilious attacks and rheumatic pains. In 1964, Zachary Cope postulated tubercular Addison’s to explain her symptoms and her relatively pain-free illness. Literary scholars later countered this posthumous diagnosis on grounds that are not well substantiated, while medical authors supported his conclusion. Important symptoms reported by contemporary Addison’s patients—mental confusion, generalised pain and suffering, weight loss and anorexia—are absent from Jane Austen’s letters. Thus, by listening to (...)
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  31.  7
    A. Upfal (2005). Jane Austen's Lifelong Health Problems and Final Illness: New Evidence Points to a Fatal Hodgkin's Disease and Excludes the Widely Accepted Addison's. Medical Humanities 31 (1):3-11.
    Next SectionJane Austen is typically described as having excellent health until the age of 40 and the onset of a mysterious and fatal illness, initially identified by Sir Zachary Cope in 1964 as Addison’s disease. Her biographers, deceived both by Cassandra Austen’s destruction of letters containing medical detail, and the cheerful high spirits of the existing letters, have seriously underestimated the extent to which illness affected Austen’s life. A medical history reveals that she was particularly susceptible to (...)
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  32. Christopher Potts, Paul Grice: Philosopher and Linguist, by Siobhan Chapman. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. Pp. VII + 247. H/B £45. [REVIEW]
    Paul Grice seems to have led a quintessentially academic life — a life spent jotting notes, giving lectures, reading, talking, and arguing with his past self and with others. In virtue of his age and station, he remained largely at the fringes of the great battles of his day — World War II and the clash of the positivists with the ordinary language group. There are no grand family tensions `a la Russell, nor any deep psychoses `a la Wittgenstein. Just (...)
     
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  33. E. M. Dadlez (2009). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A compelling exploration of the convergence of Jane Austen’s literary themes and characters with David Hume’s views on morality and human nature. Argues that the normative perspectives endorsed in Jane Austen's novels are best characterized in terms of a Humean approach, and that the merits of Hume's account of ethical, aesthetic and epistemic virtue are vividly illustrated by Austen's writing. Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand (...)
     
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  34. A. Walton Litz (1975). Recollecting Jane Austen. Critical Inquiry 1 (3):669-682.
    The nineteenth century compared her to Shakespeare; in our own time, she has been likened most often to Henry James. Both comparisons reflect a basic difficulty in reconciling subject matter with treatment, in squaring Jane Austen's restricted world - "3 or 4 Families in a Country Village" - with her profound impact upon our imaginations. Over the years her admirers have tried to resolve this paradox in various ways, none quite successful, but throughout all the changes in critical method (...)
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  35.  9
    Adela Pinch (1996). Strange Fits of Passion: Epistemologies of Emotion, Hume to Austen. Stanford University Press.
    This book contends that when late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century writers sought to explain the origins of emotions, they often discovered that their feelings may not really have been their own. It explores the paradoxes of representing feelings in philosophy, aesthetic theory, gender ideology, literature, and popular sentimentality, and it argues that this period's obsession with sentimental, wayward emotion was inseparable from the dilemmas resulting from attempts to locate the origins of feelings in experience. The book shows how these epistemological (...)
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  36. Louise Ross (ed.) (1995). Jane Austen: Family History. Routledge.
    There have been more studies, critical books, and learned articles produced over the years about Jane Austen than of any other English literary "great" with the exception of William Shakespeare. The flow of these studies greatly increased in the latter part of this century. Her novels, juvenilia and surviving letters have been intensively researched. Added to this, there is an ever growing interest in her life, times, the importance to her writing of a sense of place, and in her (...)
     
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  37. Anne Ruderman (1995). The Pleasures of Virtue: Political Thought in the Novels of Jane Austen. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Through a careful analysis of Jane Austen's novels that is sure to be controversial, Ruderman offers a unique interpretation of her subject's political philosophy. Her study challenges prevailing Austen scholarship, particularly contemporary feminist readings of Austen which impose historicist conventions upon her works. Locating and examining Austen's thought within a broad political and philosophical context, she concludes that Austen's conservative endorsement of marriage was motivated by her concern with happiness rather than with tradition.
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  38. F. G. Gornall (1967). Marriage, Property & Romance in Jane Austen's Novels. Hibbert Journal 65 (59):151-56.
  39. John Ely (1995). Jane Austen: A Female Aristotelian. Thesis Eleven 40 (1):93-118.
  40. Margaret Watkins Tate (2007). Resources for Solitude: Proper Self-Sufficiency in Jane Austen. Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):323-343.
  41.  77
    Alice MacLachlan (2010). Mirrors to One Another: Emotions and Moral Value in Jane Austen and David Hume, E. M. Dadlez. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
  42.  4
    Alasdair Cochrane (2013). Review Animals, Equality and Democracy O'Sullivan Siobhan Palgrave Macmillan Basingstoke, England. Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (1):106-108.
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  43.  22
    Susan Fraiman (1995). Jane Austen and Edward Said: Gender, Culture, and Imperialism. Critical Inquiry 21 (4):805-821.
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  44.  17
    Cheryl Ann Weissman (1982). Patterns of Doubleness in Jane Austen's Persuasion. Semiotics:191-198.
  45.  17
    Rodger L. Jackson (2000). The Sense and Sensibility of Betrayal: Discovering the Meaning of Treachery Through Jane Austen. Humanitas 13 (2):72-89.
  46.  57
    Theodore M. Benditt (2003). The Virtue of Pride: Jane Austen as Moralist. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):245-257.
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  47.  10
    Raymond J. Wilson (2003). Gardens in Stoppard, Austen, and Goethe. Analecta Husserliana 78:59-68.
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  48.  53
    Susanna Siegel (2002). Review of A Theory of Sentience, by Austen Clark. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 111 (1).
    First, what it is for a sentient being to sense is for it to employ two distinct capacities: one for representing places-at-times; the other for representing "features" (60, cf. 70). Exercised together, the result is akin to feature-placing, which brings us to the second thesis: what sensory systems represent is that features are instantiated at place-times. Accordingly, sensory systems do not, for instance, attribute properties to objects, such as trees, tables, bodies, or persons (163).
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  49.  18
    Catherine A. Sheehan (1951). Jane Austen. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):314-316.
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  50. John Wiltshire (1991). Jane Austen, Health, and the Body. The Critical Review 31 (122):34.
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