Search results for 'Slavery' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    George Schedler (2007). Should There Be an Apology for American Slavery? Should There Be an Apology for American Slavery? 21 (2):125-148.
    Contemporary white Americans cannot meaningfully ask forgiveness from present-day African Americans for slavery, because such a group apology does not have the mental state needed to communicate regret and intend that listeners forgive the group. Even if the requisite mental state were present, contemporary white Americans are not responsible for the wrong and cannot apologize for wrongs for which they are not responsible. Additionally, such a purported apology is not directed to the victims of the wrong but instead seeks (...)
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  2.  20
    Jacqueline Broad (2014). Mary Astell on Marriage and Lockean Slavery. History of Political Thought 35 (4):717–38.
    In the 1706 third edition of her Reflections upon Marriage, Mary Astell alludes to John Locke’s definition of slavery in her descriptions of marriage. She describes the state of married women as being ‘subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, Arbitrary Will of another Man’ (Locke, Two Treatises, II.22). Recent scholars maintain that Astell does not seriously regard marriage as a form of slavery in the Lockean sense. In this paper, I defend the contrary position: I argue that Astell (...)
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  3.  33
    Danny Frederick (2016). The Possibility of Contractual Slavery. Philosophical Quarterly 66 (262):47-64.
    In contrast to eminent historical philosophers, almost all contemporary philosophers maintain that slavery is impermissible. In the enthusiasm of the Enlightenment, a number of arguments gained currency which were intended to show that contractual slavery is not merely impermissible but impossible. Those arguments are influential today in moral, legal and political philosophy, even in discussions that go beyond the issue of contractual slavery. I explain what slavery is, giving historical and other illustrations. I examine the arguments (...)
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  4.  32
    Danny Frederick (2014). Voluntary Slavery. Las Torres de Lucca 4:115-37.
    The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty (...)
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  5. Lisa Guenther (2012). The Most Dangerous Place: Pro-Life Politics and the Rhetoric of Slavery. Postmodern Culture 22 (2).
    In recent years, comparisons between abortion and slavery have become increasingly common in American pro-life politics. Some have compared the struggle to extinguish abortion rights to the struggle to end slavery. Others have claimed that Roe v Wade is the Dred Scott of our time. Still others have argued that abortion is worse than slavery; it is a form of genocide. This paper tracks the abortion = slavery meme from Ronald Reagan to the current personhood movement, (...)
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  6. Nicole A. Vincent (2006). Equality, Responsibility and Talent Slavery. Imprints 9 (2):118-39.
    Egalitarians must address two questions: i. What should there be an equality of, which concerns the currency of the ‘equalisandum’; and ii. How should this thing be allocated to achieve the so-called equal distribution? A plausible initial composite answer to these two questions is that resources should be allocated in accordance with choice, because this way the resulting distribution of the said equalisandum will ‘track responsibility’ — responsibility will be tracked in the sense that only we will be responsible for (...)
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  7.  68
    Simon Roberts-Thomson (2008). An Explanation of the Injustice of Slavery. Res Publica 14 (2):69-82.
    The institution of slavery is an unjust institution. The aim of this paper is to provide an explanation of why it is unjust. I argue that slavery is unjust because it makes it impossible for slaves to realise both their interest in self-respect and their interest in being at home in the world. Furthermore, I argue that this explanation of the injustice of slavery also provides us with an argument for political equality.
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  8.  11
    Hayley Rose Glaholt (2012). Vivisection as War: The Moral Diseases of Animal Experimentation and Slavery in British Victorian Quaker Pacifist Ethics. Society and Animals 20 (2):154-172.
    This paper demonstrates how British Quakers, between 1870 and 1914, attempted to understand and debate the issue of vivisection through the lens of the Quaker peace testimony. Drawing on primary source materials, the article argues that these Friends were able to agitate for radical legislative and social change using virtue ethics as their framework. The paper further suggests that the moral parameters of the Quaker testimony for peace expanded briefly in this period to include interspecies as well as intraspecies engagement. (...)
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  9. Anita Allen, Bernard Boxill, Joshua Cohen, R. M. Hare, Bill Lawson, Tommy Lott, Howard McGary, Julius Moravcsik, Laurence Thomas, William Uzgalis, Julie Ward, Bernard Williams & Cynthia Willett (eds.) (1998). Subjugation and Bondage: Critical Essays on Slavery and Social Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This volume addresses a wide variety of moral concerns regarding slavery as an institutionalized social practice. By considering the slave's critical appropriation of the natural rights doctrine, the ambiguous implications of various notions of consent and liberty are examined. The authors assume that, although slavery is undoubtedly an evil social practice, its moral assessment stands in need of a more nuanced treatment. They address the question of what is wrong with slavery by critically examining, and in some (...)
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  10.  24
    Alexander Brown (2011). The Slavery of the Not So Talented. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):185-196.
    The article sets forth Ronald Dworkin’s efforts to avert the slavery of the talented within his theory of equality, so that they are not forced to work full-time at one type of job, but then criticises Dworkin for failing to apply similar concerns to not so talented workers. It argues that he overlooks the problem of the slavery of the not so talented that results from the tough rules he proposes for dealing with insurance payouts. Finally, it tries (...)
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  11.  7
    Wendy H. Wong (2011). Is Trafficking Slavery? Anti-Slavery International in the Twenty-First Century. Human Rights Review 12 (3):315-328.
    Why was Anti-Slavery International (ASI) so effective at changing norms slavery and even mobilizing the support that ended the transatlantic slave trade at the end of the nineteenth century, and why has that success not continued on into subsequent eras? This article claims that ASI's organizational structure is the key to understanding why its accomplishments in earlier eras have yet to be replicated, and why today it struggles to make modern forms of slavery, such as human trafficking, (...)
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  12.  17
    Maurice S. Lee (2005). Slavery, Philosophy, and American Literature, 1830-1860. Cambridge University Press.
    Examining the literature of slavery and race before the Civil War, Maurice Lee demonstrates for the first time exactly how the slavery crisis became a crisis of philosophy that exposed the breakdown of national consensus and the limits of rational authority. Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, and Emerson were among the antebellum authors who tried - and failed - to find rational solutions to the slavery conflict. Unable to mediate the slavery controversy as the nation moved toward (...)
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  13. Marjorie Spiegel (1996). The Dreaded Comparison: Human and Animal Slavery. Mirror Books.
     
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  14.  97
    Uwe Steinhoff (2012). Unsavory Implications of a Theory of Justice and the Law of Peoples: The Denial of Human Rights and the Justification of Slavery. Philosophical Forum 43 (2):175-196.
    Many philosophers have criticized John Rawls’s Law of Peoples. However, often these criticisms take it for granted that the moral conclusions drawn in A Theory of Justice are superior to those in the former book. In my view, however, Rawls comes to many of his 'conclusions' without too many actual inferences. More precisely, my argument here is that if one takes Rawls’s premises and the assumptions made about the original position(s) seriously and does in fact think them through to their (...)
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  15.  12
    Eric Foner (2011). The Civil War and Slavery: A Response. Historical Materialism 19 (4):199-205.
  16.  10
    Steve Edwards (2011). A Symposium on the American Civil War and Slavery. Historical Materialism 19 (4):33-44.
  17.  14
    Nicolas M. Dahan & Milton Gittens (2010). Business and the Public Affairs of Slavery: A Discursive Approach of an Ethical Public Issue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):227 - 249.
    This article aims at understanding how "ethical public issues" are created, and dealt within a public arena. Here, we view ethical public issues as social constructs, which are the results of issue framing contests. Such an approach will enable us to understand how ethical public issues emerge and are shaped by strategizing actors (including firms, NGOs, the media, and governments), in an attempt to impose their own definition and preferred solution to the issue. We also propose key factors which explain (...)
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  18.  76
    Malcolm Heath (2008). Aristotle on Natural Slavery. Phronesis 53 (3):243 - 270.
    Aristotle's claim that natural slaves do not possess autonomous rationality (Pol. 1.5, 1254b20-23) cannot plausibly be interpreted in an unrestricted sense, since this would conflict with what Aristotle knew about non-Greek societies. Aristotle's argument requires only a lack of autonomous practical rationality. An impairment of the capacity for integrated practical deliberation, resulting from an environmentally induced excess or deficiency in thumos (Pol. 7.7, 1327b18-31), would be sufficient to make natural slaves incapable of eudaimonia without being obtrusively implausible relative to what (...)
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  19.  18
    Alison Brysk (2011). Sex as Slavery? Understanding Private Wrongs. Human Rights Review 12 (3):259-270.
    The era of globalization has been accompanied by an increased awareness of private wrongs as well as acceleration of many forms of cross-border labor exploitation. The essay explores how refined distinctions between forced and free sex work could improve anti-trafficking policies. It addresses the understudied linkages between other forms of migration and sexual exploitation and suggests a triage approach to all forms of labor exploitation—based on harms rather than type of labor or victim. A better understanding of freedom, sex, and (...)
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  20.  9
    D. T. & Glenn R. Morrow (1942). Plato's Law of Slavery in Its Relation to Greek Law. Journal of Hellenic Studies 62 (1):94.
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  21.  27
    Malcolm Heath (2008). Aristotle on Natural Slavery. Phronesis 53 (3):243-270.
    Aristotle's claim that natural slaves do not possess autonomous rationality (Pol. 1.5, 1254b20-23) cannot plausibly be interpreted in an unrestricted sense, since this would conflict with what Aristotle knew about non-Greek societies. Aristotle's argument requires only a lack of autonomous practical rationality. An impairment of the capacity for integrated practical deliberation, resulting from an environmentally induced excess or deficiency in thumos (Pol. 7.7, 1327b18-31), would be sufficient to make natural slaves incapable of eudaimonia without being obtrusively implausible relative to what (...)
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  22.  4
    Charles Post (2012). The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights, Robin Blackburn, London: Verso, 2011. Historical Materialism 20 (4):199-212.
  23.  2
    Ênio José da Costa Brito (2013). Uma leitura da escravidão pela ótica dos desafios do antiescravismo (A reading of slavery from the perspective of the challenges of antislavery). Horizonte 11 (29):294-320.
    Ênio José da Costa Brito apresenta Uma leitura da escravidão pela ótica dos desafios do antiescravismo . Trata-se de minuciosa nota bibliográfica sobre a obra de Seymour Drescher: DRESCHER, Seymour. Abolição: Uma história da Escravidão e do Antiescravismo. São Paulo: Editora UNESP, 2011, 736p. ISBN 978-85-393-0184-3.
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  24. Stanley L. Engerman, Seymour Drescher & Robert L. Paquette (2001). Slavery. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  25. David Forman (2012). Kant on Moral Freedom and Moral Slavery. Kantian Review 17 (1):1-32.
    Kant’s account of the freedom gained through virtue builds on the Socratic tradition. On the Socratic view, when morality is our end, nothing can hinder us from attaining satisfaction: we are self-sufficient and free since moral goodness is (as Kant says) “created by us, hence is in our power.” But when our end is the fulfillment of sensible desires, our satisfaction requires luck as well as the cooperation of others. For Kant, this means that happiness requires that we get other (...)
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  26. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women". Hypatia 20 (3):127 - 148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  27. R. M. Hare (1979). What is Wrong with Slavery. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (2):103-121.
    This article discusses the definition of slavery as a status in society and a relation to an owner. an imaginary case in which utilitarian arguments could justify slavery. this case, just because it is highly unlikely to occur in the actual world, does not provide an argument against utilitarianism. if it did occur, slavery would be justified in this case, but that is no reason for abandoning our intuitive principle condemning slavery. the adoption of this principle (...)
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  28. Thornton Lockwood (2007). Is Natural Slavery Beneficial? Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):207-221.
    Aristotle's account of natural slavery appears to be internally inconsistent concerning whether slavery is advantageous to the natural slave. Whereas the Politics asserts that slavery is beneficial to the slave, the ethical treatises deny such a claim. Examination of Aristotle's arguments suggests a distinction which resolves the apparent contradiction. Aristotle distinguishes between the common benefit between two people who join together in an association And the same benefit which exists between a whole and its parts. Master and (...)
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  29.  45
    Thomas McCarthy (2004). Coming to Terms with Our Past, Part II: On the Morality and Politics of Reparations for Slavery. Political Theory 32 (6):750-772.
    There has recently been a surge of interest, theoretical and political, in reparations for slavery. This essay takes up several moral-political issues from that intensifying debate: how to conceptualize and justify collective compensation and collective responsibility, and how to establish a plausible connection between past racial injustices and present racial inequalities. It concludes with some brief remarks on one aspect of the very complicated politics of reparations: the possible effects of hearings and trials on the public memory and political (...)
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  30.  9
    Brad Hinshelwood (2013). The Carolinian Context of John Locke's Theory of Slavery. Political Theory 41 (4):0090591713485446.
    The debate over Locke’s theory of slavery has focused on his involvement with the Royal African Company and other institutions of African slavery, as well as his rhetorical use of slavery in opposing absolutism. This overlooks Locke’s deep involvement with the Carolina colony, and in particular that colony’s Indian slave trade, which was largely justified in just-war terms. Evidence of Locke’s participation in the 1682 revisions to the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, which removed the infamous “absolute power (...)
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  31.  85
    Alan E. Fuchs (2001). Autonomy, Slavery, and Mill's Critique of Paternalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (3):231-251.
    Critics have charged that John Stuart Mill''s discussion as of paternalism in On Liberty is internally inconsistent, noting, for example, the numerous instances in which Mill explicitly endorses examples of paternalistic coercion. Similarly, commentators have noted an apparent contradiction between Mill''s political liberalism – according to which the state should be neutral among competing conceptions of the good – and Mill''s condemnation of non-autonomous ways of life, such as that of a servile wife. More generally, critics have argued that while (...)
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  32.  4
    Tina Chanter (2011). Whose Antigone?: The Tragic Marginalization of Slavery. State University of New York Press.
    Argues for the importance of the neglected theme of slavery in Antigone.
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  33.  3
    Frank Lovett (forthcoming). The Labour Republicans and the Classical Republican Tradition: Alex Gourevitch’s From Slavery to the Cooperative Commonwealth. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885115602843.
    Alex Gourevitch’s From Slavery to the Cooperative Commonwealth is a valuable contribution to republican historiography: in reconstructing the ideas of the 19th century American labour republicans, this work significantly expands and enriches our appreciation of the classical republican tradition. While the labour republicans are convincingly shown to have made important contributions to that tradition, stronger claims that they fundamentally transformed republicanism are less persuasive.
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  34.  40
    L. Brace (2013). Inhuman Commerce: Anti-Slavery and the Ownership of Freedom. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):466-482.
    This article explores the British anti-slavery writings of the mid- to late 18th century, and the meanings which they gave to the idea of owning a property in the person. It addresses the construction of a particular moral and political landscape where freedom was understood as both a kind of property and as non-domination, and slavery was constructed as a form of theft, and as the exercise of arbitrary power. This created a complex moral space, where possession, commerce, (...)
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  35.  11
    Andrew Sneddon (2001). What's Wrong with Selling Yourself Into Slavery? Paternalism and Deep Autonomy (¿Por Qué Está Mal Moralmente Venderse Uno Mismo Como Esclavo? Paternalismo y Autonomía Profunda). Critica 33 (98):97 - 121.
    Such thinkers as John Stuart Mill, Gerald Dworkin, and Richard Doerflinger have appealed to the value of freedom to explain both what is wrong with slavery and what is wrong with selling oneself into slavery. Practical ethicists, including Dworkin and Doerflinger, sometimes use selling oneself into slavery in analogies intended to illustrate justifiable forms of paternalism. I argue that these thinkers have misunderstood the moral problem with slavery. Instead of being a central value in itself, I (...)
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  36.  23
    Andrew Huddleston (2014). "Consecration to Culture": Nietzsche on Slavery and Human Dignity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):135-160.
    In the Infamous Opening Sections from Part IX of Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche celebrates a strident kind of elitism and countenances, in however attenuated a form, the institution of slavery. “Every enhancement of the type ‘man,’” he writes, “has so far been the work of an aristocratic society—and it will be so again and again—a society that believes in the long ladder of an order of rank and difference in worth [Werthverschiedenheit] between man and man, and that needs (...)
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  37.  10
    Kevin Bales & Peter T. Robbins (2001). “No One Shall Be Held in Slavery or Servitude”: A Critical Analysis of International Slavery Agreements and Concepts of Slavery. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 2 (2):18-45.
    No international agreement has been completely effective in reducing slavery. This stems in part from the evolution of slavery agreements and the inclination on the part of the authors of conventions to include other practices as part of the slavery defintion, resulting in a confusion of the practices and definitions of slavery. What has been missing is a classification that is dynamic and yet sufficiently universal to identify slavery no matter how it evolves. We have (...)
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  38.  8
    James Farr (2008). Locke, Natural Law, and New World Slavery. Political Theory 36 (4):495 - 522.
    This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to "absolute power" in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory--or vice (...)
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  39.  1
    Louis Sala-Molins (2006). Dark Side of the Light: Slavery and the French Enlightenment. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Translated into English for the first time, Dark Side of the Light scrutinizes Condorcet’s Reflections on Negro Slavery and the works of Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Diderot side by side with the Code Noir (the royal document that codified ...
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  40.  16
    Giampaolo Abbate (2012). On the Principle of Any Domination. Aristotle's Reasons Why Slavery is by Nature and for the Better. Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13:1-16.
    Aristotle�s account on natural slavery is neither misleading nor paradoxical, but plausible even though controversial, unlike many commentators think of. On his view natural masters are essentially the virtuous people, viz. those who have been perfected in their process of growing, and natural slaves are essentially the vicious people, viz. those who have been injured or corrupted in some way in their growing up so as to suffer from a lack of autonomous practical rationality. Of course, many barbarians are (...)
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  41.  14
    Mary Cunneen (2005). Anti-Slavery International. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (1):85 – 92.
    Despite the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, slavery is not confined to the past. Many forms of slavery exist worldwide today, as highlighted by increased recent awareness of trafficking. International, and some national, legislation to combat contemporary slavery and trafficking exists, yet these practices continue. As important as legislation is its effective and sensitive implementation. With trafficking, we need to recognise the complexities of forced labour within a global context and move policy beyond its current restricted (...)
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  42.  8
    Sanford Levinson (2007). Slavery and the Phenomenology of Torture. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):149-168.
    Torture has become the subject of intense debate in recent years. One facet of that debate is whether there are any circumstances during which it might be an appropriate response by a respectable government. One might wonder precisely why torture receives so much more attention than, say, the "collateral damage" that is an inevitable aspect of contemporary warfare. But the debate also involves what counts as "torture," as distinguished from "cruel, inhuman, and degrading" methods of interrogation or even "coercive but (...)
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  43.  2
    Howard Mcgary & Bill E. Lawson (1994). [Book Review] Between Slavery and Freedom, Philosophy and American Slavery. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (4):898-900.
    Using the writings of slaves and former slaves, as well as commentaries on slavery, Between Slavery and Freedom explores the American slave experience to gain a better understanding of six moral and political concepts—oppression, paternalism, resistance, political obligation, citizenship, and forgiveness. The authors use analytical philosophy as well as other disciplines to gain insight into the thinking of a group of people prevented from participating in the social/political discourse of their times. Between Slavery and Freedom rejects the (...)
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  44.  26
    Brian Calvert (1987). Slavery in Plato's Republic. Classical Quarterly 37 (02):367-.
    For a number of years, in the not too distant past, there was a lively debate between Plato's defenders and critics over the question of whether his Republic contained slaves. However, since the appearance of an article by Gregory Vlastos1 some twenty years ago, it seems to have been generally felt that the issue has been resolved, and the controversy has died down. Vlastos argued that the evidence admits of no doubt - Plato included slaves in his ideal state. In (...)
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  45.  5
    Brady Thomas Heiner (2007). “From the Prison of Slavery to the Slavery of Prison”: Angela Y. Davis’s Abolition Democracy. Radical Philosophy Today 5:219-227.
    One of the most radical dimensions of Davis’s critique of American democracy is her exposure of the vestiges of slavery that remain in the contemporary criminal justice system. I discuss this aspect of her critical project, its roots in Du Bois’s critique of Black Reconstruction, and the way that it informs her prison abolitionism and her two-pronged program for the formation of a genuine “abolition democracy.” I conclude by reflecting upon Davis’s reticence about abolition as a constructive enterprise and (...)
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  46.  21
    Brady Thomas Heiner (2007). “From the Prison of Slavery to the Slavery of Prison”. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:219-227.
    One of the most radical dimensions of Davis’s critique of American democracy is her exposure of the vestiges of slavery that remain in the contemporary criminal justice system. I discuss this aspect of her critical project, its roots in Du Bois’s critique of Black Reconstruction, and the way that it informs her prison abolitionism and her two-pronged program for the formation of a genuine “abolition democracy.” I conclude by reflecting upon Davis’s reticence about abolition as a constructive enterprise and (...)
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  47.  27
    Katherine Chambers (2013). Slavery and Domination as Political Ideas in Augustine'scity of God. Heythrop Journal 54 (1):13-28.
    The purpose of this article is to explore the meaning of domination and slavery in the political philosophy of Augustine of Hippo (354–430), particularly in the major work of his later years, the City of God. It offers an exploration of this aspect of Augustine's thought in the light of relatively recent scholarship on the meaning of these terms for political philosophy (in particular, the work of Quentin Skinner and Philip Pettit). It finds that, in Augustine's eyes, the nature (...)
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  48.  9
    David Schwan (2013). JS Mill on Coolie Labour and Voluntary Slavery. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):754-766.
    This article discusses John Stuart Mill's voluntary slavery argument in On Liberty. The author shows that standard interpretations of the argument rely on the assumption that part of Mill's objection to voluntary slavery is the permanent nature of the decision. However, in correspondence, Mill also objects to voluntary ?coolie? labour contracts, which he regards as a form of slavery. This produces difficulties for standard interpretations of the voluntary slavery argument. Finally, the author provides a revised interpretation (...)
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  49.  7
    George Schedlerf (2002). Principles for Measuring the Damages of American Slavery. Public Affairs Quarterly, 16 (4):377-404.
    Either slavery has done no measurable damage to the descendants of slaves, or. if it has. that there are no individuals in the present generation who are obligated to make payments to them,though the federal government may be responsible for a portion of the damages.
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  50.  19
    Jennifer Welchman (1995). Locke on Slavery and Inalienable Rights. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):67 - 81.
    Some have argued that Locke's failure to condemn contemporary slavery is best viewed as a personal moral lapse which does not reflect on his political theory. I argue to the contrary.
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