Search results for 'Sleep' (try it on Scholar)

740 found
Order:
  1.  3
    Mark C. W. Sleep (1969). Sir William Hamilton : His Work and Influence in Geology. Annals of Science 25 (4):319-338.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mark Solms (2000). Dreaming and Rem Sleep Are Controlled by Different Brain Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):843-850.
    The paradigmatic assumption that REM sleep is the physiological equivalent of dreaming is in need of fundamental revision. A mounting body of evidence suggests that dreaming and REM sleep are dissociable states, and that dreaming is controlled by forebrain mechanisms. Recent neuropsychological, radiological, and pharmacological findings suggest that the cholinergic brain stem mechanisms that control the REM state can only generate the psychological phenomena of dreaming through the mediation of a second, probably dopaminergic, forebrain mechanism. The latter mechanism (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  3.  18
    Tore A. Nielsen (2000). A Review of Mentation in Rem and NRem Sleep: “Covert” Rem Sleep as a Possible Reconciliation of Two Opposing Models. [REVIEW] Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):851-866.
    Numerous studies have replicated the finding of mentation in both rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, two different theoretical models have been proposed to account for this finding: (1) a one-generator model, in which mentation is generated by a single set of processes regardless of physiological differences between REM and NREM sleep; and (2) a two-generator model, in which qualitatively different generators produce cognitive activity in the two states. First, research is reviewed demonstrating (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  4.  5
    Shreeya Popat & William Winslade (2015). While You Were Sleepwalking: Science and Neurobiology of Sleep Disorders & the Enigma of Legal Responsibility of Violence During Parasomnia. Neuroethics 8 (2):203-214.
    In terms of medical science and legal responsibility, the sleep disorder category of parasomnias, chiefly REM sleep behavior disorder and somnambulism, pose an enigmatic dilemma. During an episode of parasomnia, individuals are neither awake nor aware, but their actions appear conscious. As these actions move beyond the innocuous, such as eating and blurting out embarrassing information, and enter the realm of rape and homicide, their degree of importance and relevance increases exponentially. Parasomnias that result in illegal activity, particularly (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  63
    Matthew P. Walker (2005). A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  6. Owen J. Flanagan (2000). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  7.  3
    Christopher D. Morris (2015). Derridean Blackmail in The Big Sleep : Allegorizing the Unfixable Mirages of Photography, Film and Criticism. Film-Philosophy 19:304-324.
    Recent criticism has already shown that the notoriously unanswered plot questions of The Big Sleep elicit serious philosophical issues, including skepticism about the validity of interpretation itself. The film allegorizes the reason for this questioning in what Derrida calls the "blackmail" of photography--its coercive claim to represent objective truth. Blackmail arising from photography is the main plot premise of The Big Sleep, but it serves as a figure for the "postal" world of signs divorced from referents, finally epitomized (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  21
    Robert P. Vertes & Kathleen E. Eastman (2000). The Case Against Memory Consolidation in Rem Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):867-876.
    We present evidence disputing the hypothesis that memories are processed or consolidated in REM sleep. A review of REM deprivation (REMD) studies in animals shows these reports to be about equally divided in showing that REMD does, or does not, disrupt learning/memory. The studies supporting a relationship between REM sleep and memory have been strongly criticized for the confounding effects of very stressful REM deprivation techniques. The three major classes of antidepressant drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), tricyclic antidepressants (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  36
    Benjamin Hale & Lauren Hale (2009). Choosing to Sleep. In Angus Dawson (ed.), The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate
    In this paper we claim that individual subjects do not have so much control over sleep that it is aptly characterized as a personal choice; and that normative implications related to public health and sleep hygiene do not necessarily follow from current findings. It should be true of any empirical study that normative implications do not necessarily follow, but we think that many public health sleep recommendations falsely infer these implications from a flawed explanatory account of the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  8
    Patrick McNamara, Jayme Dowdall & Sanford Auerbach (2002). Rem Sleep, Early Experience, and the Development of Reproductive Strategies. Human Nature 13 (4):405-435.
    We hypothesize that rapid eye movement or REM sleep evolved, in part, to mediate sexual/reproductive behaviors and strategies. Because development of sexual and mating strategies depends crucially on early attachment experiences, we further hypothesize that REM functions to mediate attachment processes early in life. Evidence for these hypotheses comes from (1) the correlation of REM variables with both attachment and sexual/reproductive variables; (2) attachment-related and sex-related hormonal release during REM; (3) selective activation during REM of brain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  8
    Matthew Wolf‐Meyer (2013). Where Have All Our Naps Gone? Or Nathaniel Kleitman, the Consolidation of Sleep, and the Historiography of Emergence. Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (2):96-116.
    In this article, I focus on two moments of Nathaniel Kleitman's career, specifically that of his Mammoth Cave experiment in the 1930s and his consultation with the United States military in the 1940s–1950s. My interests in bringing these two moments of Kleitman's career together are to examine the role of nature and the social in his understanding of human sleep and the legacies these have engendered for sleep science and medicine in the present; more specifically, I am interested (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  26
    J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.
    Consciousness can be studied only if subjective experience is documented and quantified, yet first-person accounts of the effects of brain injury on conscious experience are as rare as they are potentially useful. This report documents the alterations in waking, sleeping, and dreaming caused by a lateral medullary infarct. Total insomnia and the initial suppression of dreaming was followed by the gradual recovery of both functions. A visual hallucinosis during waking that was associated with the initial period of sleep and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  26
    Corey Anton (2006). Dreamless Sleep and the Whole of Human Life: An Ontological Exposition. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):181 - 202.
    This paper explores the meaning of dreamless sleep. First, I consider four reasons why we commonly pass over sleep's ontological significance. Second, I compare and contrast death and sleep to show how each is oriented to questions regarding the possibilities of "being-a-whole." In the third and final part, I explore the meaning and implications of "being-toward-sleep," arguing that human existence emerges atop naturally anonymous corporeality (i.e. living being). In sum, I try to show that we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  17
    Giulio Tononi & Chiara Cirelli (2005). Sleep and Synaptic Homeostasis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):85-85.
    We propose that sleep is linked to synaptic homeostasis. Specifically, we propose that: (1) Wakefulness is associated with synaptic potentiation in cortical circuits; (2) synaptic potentiation is tied to the homeostatic regulation of slow wave activity; (3) slow wave activity is associated with synaptic downscaling; and (4) synaptic downscaling is tied to several beneficial effects of sleep, including performance enhancement.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  14
    M. Jason Reddoch (2011). Philo of Alexandria’s Use of Sleep and Dreaming as Epistemological Metaphors in Relation to Joseph. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (2):283-302.
    Dreams are used figuratively throughout Greek literature to refer to something fleeting and/or unreal. In Plato, this metaphorical language is specifically used to describe an epistemological distinction: the one who has false knowledge or opinion is said to be dreaming while the one who has true knowledge is said to be awake. These figures are also central to Philo of Alexandria's philosophical language in De somniis 1-2 and De Iosepho. Although scholars have documented these epistemological metaphors in Plato and related (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  19
    Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free and voluntary choices (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  5
    Megan Brown (2004). Taking Care of Business: Self-Help and Sleep Medicine in American Corporate Culture. Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (3):173-187.
    This article argues that corporate management in the United States has expanded its scope beyond office walls and encompasses many aspects of workers' daily lives. One new element of corporate training is the micromanagement of sleep; self-help books, newspaper reports, magazine articles, and consulting firms currently advise workers and supervisors on optimizing productivity by cultivating certain sleep habits. Although consultants and self-help books make specific recommendations about sleep, most medical research is inconclusive about sleep's benefits for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Mircea Steriade (1978). Cortical Long-Axoned Cells and Putative Interneurons During the Sleep-Waking Cycle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):465.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   57 citations  
  19.  80
    Allan Rechtschaffen (1997). Current Perspectives on the Function of Sleep. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (3):359-390.
  20.  11
    Glenn Gunzelmann, Joshua B. Gross, Kevin A. Gluck & David F. Dinges (2009). Sleep Deprivation and Sustained Attention Performance: Integrating Mathematical and Cognitive Modeling. Cognitive Science 33 (5):880-910.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21.  23
    Edwin M. Robertson, Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Daniel Z. Press (2004). Awareness Modifies the Skill-Learning Benefits of Sleep. Current Biology 14 (3):208-212.
  22. Owen J. Flanagan (1995). Deconstructing Dreams: The Spandrels of Sleep. Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.
  23.  14
    William Dement & Nathaniel Kleitman (1957). The Relation of Eye Movements During Sleep to Dream Activity: An Objective Method for the Study of Dreaming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (5):339.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  24. Allan Hobson (2004). A Model for Madness? Dream Consciousness: Our Understanding of the Neurobiology of Sleep Offers Insight Into Abnormalities in the Waking Brain. Nature 430 (6995):21.
  25.  10
    Christian Domingo & Laura Vigil (2011). Effectiveness of Unattended Ambulatory Sleep Studies for the Diagnosis and Treatment of OSAS. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (1):26-31.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    J. A. Hobson, R. Lydic & H. A. Baghdoyan (1986). Evolving Concepts of Sleep Cycle Generation: From Brain Centers to Neuronal Populations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):371.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  27.  10
    Charles W. Simon & William H. Emmons (1956). Responses to Material Presented During Various Levels of Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):89.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  10
    Terry R. Barrett & Bruce R. Ekstrand (1972). Effect of Sleep on Memory: III. Controlling for Time-of-Day Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):321.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  18
    Henry W. Johnstone Jr (1973). Toward a Philosophy of Sleep. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (September):73-81.
    My chief claim is that no one could understand the meaning of either 'consciousness' or 'unconsciousness' unless his consciousness had been interrupted on at least one occasion. I consider various attempts that might be made to teach the meanings of these terms to a person who had never lost consciousness, And I show how these attempts fail. The ideas of consciousness and unconsciousness can occur only to a person in whose experience there has been a gap.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  27
    Robert L. Caldwell (1965). Malcolm and the Criterion of Sleep. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (December):339-352.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  27
    Jan Born & Ullrich Wagner (2004). Awareness in Memory: Being Explicit About the Role of Sleep. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):242-244.
  32.  6
    Robert T. Wilkinson (1961). Interaction of Lack of Sleep with Knowledge of Results, Repeated Testing, and Individual Differences. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (3):263.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  24
    Robert Brown (1957). Sound Sleep and Sound Scepticism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 35 (May):47-53.
  34.  3
    Hans O. Lisper & Anders Kjellberg (1972). Effects of 24-Hour Sleep Deprivation on Rate of Decrement in a 10-Minute Auditory Reaction Time Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):287.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  21
    W. Moorcroft & J. Breitenstein (2000). Awareness of Time During Sleep. Annals of Medicine 32 (4):236-238.
  36.  4
    M. J. Bass (1931). Differentiation of the Hypnotic Trance From Normal Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 14 (4):382.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  3
    Robert T. Wilkinson (1962). Muscle Tension During Mental Work Under Sleep Deprivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (6):565.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  4
    Bruce R. Ekstrand (1967). Effect of Sleep on Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (1):64.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  3
    Wilse B. Webb (1957). Antecedents of Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (3):162.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  3
    Anders Broström, Bengt Fridlund, Martin Ulander, Ola Sunnergren, Eva Svanborg & Per Nilsen (2013). A Mixed Method Evaluation of a Group‐Based Educational Programme for CPAP Use in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):173-184.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  3
    Robert T. Wilkinson (1963). Aftereffect of Sleep Deprivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (5):439-442.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  1
    Bruce R. Ekstrand, Michael J. Sullivan, David F. Parker & James N. West (1971). Spontaneous Recovery and Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (1):142.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  1
    F. J. Mullin, N. Kleitman & N. R. Cooperman (1937). Studies on the Physiology of Sleep Changes in Irritability to Auditory Stimuli During Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):88.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    E. S. Robinson & S. O. Herrmann (1922). Effects of Loss of Sleep. I. Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (1):19.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  2
    Robert T. Wilkinson (1963). Interaction of Noise with Knowledge of Results and Sleep Deprivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (4):332.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Ralph J. Berger & James M. Walker (1972). Oculomotor Coordination Following REM and Non-REM Sleep Periods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (2):216.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  10
    Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.
  48.  2
    A. L. Loomis, E. N. Harvey & G. A. Hobart (1937). Cerebral States During Sleep, as Studied by Human Brain Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (2):127.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    C. E. Henry (1941). Electroencephalographic Individual Differences and Their Constancy: I. During Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):117.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  2
    J. W. Nygard (1939). Cerebral Circulation Prevailing During Sleep and Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):1.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 740