Search results for 'Social Interaction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hanne De Jaegher & Tom Froese (2009). On the Role of Social Interaction in Individual Agency. Adaptive Behavior 17 (5):444-460.score: 90.0
    Is an individual agent constitutive of or constituted by its social interactions? This question is typically not asked in the cognitive sciences, so strong is the consensus that only individual agents have constitutive efficacy. In this article we challenge this methodological solipsism and argue that interindividual relations and social context do not simply arise from the behavior of individual agents, but themselves enable and shape the individual agents on which they depend. For this, we define the notion of (...)
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  2. Susan A. J. Stuart (1998). The Role of Deception in Complex Social Interaction. Cogito 12 (1):25-32.score: 90.0
    Social participation requires certain abilities: communication with other members of society; social understanding which enables planning ahead and dealing with novel circumstances; and a theory of mind which makes it possible to anticipate the mental state of another. In childhood play we learn how to pretend, how to put ourselves in the minds of others, how to imagine what others are thinking and how to attribute false beliefs to them. Without this ability we would be unable to deceive (...)
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  3. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing an Understanding of Mind: The Development of Children's Social Understanding Within Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):79-96.score: 90.0
    Theories of children's developing understanding of mind tend to emphasize either individualistic processes of theory formation, maturation, or introspection, or the process of enculturation. However, such theories must be able to account for the accumulating evidence of the role of social interaction in the development of social understanding. We propose an alternative account, according to which the development of children's social understanding occurs within triadic interaction involving the child's experience of the world as well as (...)
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  4. Mitchell Herschbach (2012). On the Role of Social Interaction in Social Cognition: A Mechanistic Alternative to Enactivism. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):467-486.score: 90.0
    Researchers in the enactivist tradition have recently argued that social interaction can constitute social cognition, rather than simply serve as the context for social cognition. They contend that a focus on social interaction corrects the overemphasis on mechanisms inside the individual in the explanation of social cognition. I critically assess enactivism’s claims about the explanatory role of social interaction in social cognition. After sketching the enactivist approach to cognition in general (...)
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  5. Hanne de Jaegher, Ezequiel di Paolo & Shaun Gallagher (2010). Can Social Interaction Constitute Social Cognition? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):441-447.score: 90.0
    An important shift is taking place in social cognition research, away from a focus on the individual mind and toward embodied and participatory aspects of social understanding. Empirical results already imply that social cognition is not reducible to the workings of individual cognitive mechanisms. To galvanize this interactive turn, we provide an operational definition of social interaction and distinguish the different explanatory roles – contextual, enabling and constitutive – it can play in social cognition. (...)
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  6. Sonja A. Kotz Laura Verga (2013). How Relevant is Social Interaction in Second Language Learning? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Verbal language is the most widespread mode of human communication, and an intrinsically social activity. This claim is strengthen by evidence emerging from different fields, which clearly indicate that social interaction influences human communication, and more specifically, language learning. Indeed, research conducted with infants and children shows that interaction with a caregiver is necessary to acquire language. Further evidence on the influence of sociality on language comes from social and linguistic pathologies, in which deficits in (...)
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  7. Laura Verga & Sonja A. Kotz (2013). How Relevant is Social Interaction in Second Language Learning? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Verbal language is the most widespread mode of human communication, and an intrinsically social activity. This claim is strengthen by evidence emerging from different fields, which clearly indicate that social interaction influences human communication, and more specifically, language learning. Indeed, research conducted with infants and children shows that interaction with a caregiver is necessary to acquire language. Further evidence on the influence of sociality on language comes from social and linguistic pathologies, in which deficits in (...)
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  8. Ivana Konvalinka & Andreas Roepstorff (2012). The Two-Brain Approach: How Can Mutually Interacting Brains Teach Us Something About Social Interaction? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    Measuring brain activity simultaneously from two people interacting is intuitively appealing if one is interested in putative neural markers of social interaction. However, given the complex nature of two-person interactions, it has proven difficult to carry out two-person brain imaging experiments in a methodologically feasible and conceptually relevant way. Only a small number of recent studies have put this into practice, using fMRI, EEG, or NIRS. Here, we review two main two-brain methodological approaches, each with two conceptual strategies. (...)
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  9. Ulrich J. Pfeiffer, Bert Timmermans, Kai Vogeley, Chris D. Frith & Leonhard Schilbach (2013). Towards a Neuroscience of Social Interaction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:22-22.score: 90.0
    Towards a neuroscience of social interaction.
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  10. Kai Vogeley Ulrich J. Pfeiffer, Leonhard Schilbach, Mathis Jording, Bert Timmermans, Gary Bente (2012). Eyes on the Mind: Investigating the Influence of Gaze Dynamics on the Perception of Others in Real-Time Social Interaction. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 87.0
    Social gaze provides a window into the interests and intentions of others and allows us to actively point out our own. It enables us to engage in triadic interactions involving human actors and physical objects and to build an indispensable basis for coordinated action and collaborative efforts. The object-related aspect of gaze in combination with the fact that any motor act of looking encompasses both input and output of the minds involved makes this non-verbal cue system particularly interesting for (...)
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  11. Tania Singer Marisa Przyrembel, Jonathan Smallwood, Michael Pauen (2012). Illuminating the Dark Matter of Social Neuroscience: Considering the Problem of Social Interaction From Philosophical, Psychological, and Neuroscientific Perspectives. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 84.0
    Successful human social interaction depends on our capacity to understand other people’s mental states and to anticipate how they will react to our actions. Despites its importance to the human condition, there are still quite a few debates about how we actually solve the problem of understanding other peoples’ actions, feelings and thoughts. Here we consider this problem from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives. In a critical review we show that attempts to draw parallels across these complementary levels (...)
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  12. Antonia F. De C. Hamilton Yin Wang (2012). Social Top-Down Response Modulation (STORM): A Model of the Control of Mimicry in Social Interaction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 82.0
    As a distinct feature of human social interactions, spontaneous mimicry has been widely investigated in the past decade. Research suggests that mimicry is a subtle and flexible social behaviour which plays an important role for communication and affiliation. However, fundamental questions like why and how people mimic still remain unclear. In this paper, we evaluate past theories of why people mimic and the brain systems that implement mimicry in social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. By reviewing recent behavioural (...)
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  13. Patrizio Lo Presti (2013). Situating Norms and Jointness of Social Interaction. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):225-248.score: 81.0
    0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The paper argues that contexts of interaction are structured in a way that coordinates part actions into normatively guided joint action without agents having common knowledge or mutual beliefs about intentions, beliefs, or commitments to (...)
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  14. Andreas Roepstorff Kristian Tylén, Micah Allen, Bjørk K. Hunter (2012). Interaction Vs. Observation: Distinctive Modes of Social Cognition in Human Brain and Behavior? A Combined fMRI and Eye-Tracking Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 81.0
    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social (...)
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  15. Patrizio Lo Presti (2013). Situating Norms and Jointness of Social Interaction. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):225-248.score: 81.0
    0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The paper argues that contexts of interaction are structured in a way that coordinates part actions into normatively guided joint action without agents having common knowledge or mutual beliefs about intentions, beliefs, or commitments to (...)
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  16. Hiroko Tanaka (1999). Grammer and Social Interaction in Japanese and Anglo-American English: The Display of Context, Social Identity and Social Relation. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (2-4):363-395.score: 81.0
    This paper employs conversation analysis to examine the inter-connection between grammar and displays of contextual understanding, social identity, and social relationships as well as other activities clustering around turn-endings in Japanese talk-in-interaction, while undertaking a restricted comparison with the realisation of similar activities in English. A notable feature of turn-endings in Japanese is the particular salience of grammatical construction on the interactional activities they accomplish. Complete turns which are also syntactically complete are shown to be associated with (...)
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  17. Tapio Takala Pia Tikka, Aleksander Väljamäe, Aline W. De Borst, Roberto Pugliese, Niklas Ravaja, Mauri Kaipainen (2012). Enactive Cinema Paves Way for Understanding Complex Real-Time Social Interaction in Neuroimaging Experiments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 81.0
    We outline general theoretical and practical implications of what we promote as enactive cinema for the neuroscientific study of online socio-emotional interaction. In a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) setting, participants are immersed in cinematic experiences that simulate social situations. While viewing, their physiological reactions - including brain responses - are tracked, representing implicit and unconscious experiences of the on-going social situations. These reactions, in turn, are analysed in real-time and fed back to modify the cinematic (...)
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  18. Pia Tikka, Aleksander Väljamäe, Aline W. de Borst, Roberto Pugliese, Niklas Ravaja, Mauri Kaipainen & Tapio Takala (2012). Enactive Cinema Paves Way for Understanding Complex Real-Time Social Interaction in Neuroimaging Experiments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 81.0
    We outline general theoretical and practical implications of what we promote as enactive cinema for the neuroscientific study of online socio-emotional interaction. In a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) setting, participants are immersed in cinematic experiences that simulate social situations. While viewing, their physiological reactions - including brain responses - are tracked, representing implicit and unconscious experiences of the on-going social situations. These reactions, in turn, are analysed in real-time and fed back to modify the cinematic (...)
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  19. Stephen M. Fiore, Travis J. Wiltshire, Emilio J. C. Lobato, Florian G. Jentsch, Wesley H. Huang & Benjamin Axelrod (2013). Towards Understanding Social Cues and Signals in Human-Robot Interaction: Effects of Robot Gaze and Proxemic Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 4:859.score: 75.0
    As robots are increasingly deployed in settings requiring social interaction, research is needed to examine the social signals perceived by humans when robots display certain social cues. In this paper, we report a study designed to examine how humans interpret social cues exhibited by robots. We first provide a brief overview of perspectives from social cognition in humans and how these processes are applicable to human-robot interaction (HRI). We then discuss the need to (...)
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  20. Esko Kurvinen, Mia Lähteenmäki, Antti Salovaara & Fabiola Lopez (2007). Are You Alive? Sensor Data as a Resource for Social Interaction. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (1):39-49.score: 75.0
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  21. James M. Richards Jr (1962). The Cue Additivity Principle in a Restricted Social Interaction Situation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (5):452.score: 75.0
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  22. Jérémie Mattout (2012). Brain-Computer Interfaces: A Neuroscience Paradigm of Social Interaction? A Matter of Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 74.0
    Brain-Computer Interfaces: A Neuroscience Paradigm of Social Interaction? A Matter of Perspective.
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  23. Takashi Ikegami Tom Froese, Charles Lenay (2012). Imitation by Social Interaction? Analysis of a Minimal Agent-Based Model of the Correspondence Problem. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 72.0
    One of the major challenges faced by explanations of imitation is the ‘correspondence problem’: How is an agent able to match its bodily expression to the observed bodily expression of another agent, especially when there is no possibility of external self-observation? Current theories only consider the possibility of an innate or acquired matching mechanism belonging to an isolated individual. In this paper we evaluate an alternative that situates the explanation of imitation in the inter-individual dynamics of the interaction process (...)
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  24. Tom Froese & Thomas Fuchs (2012). The Extended Body: A Case Study in the Neurophenomenology of Social Interaction. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):205-235.score: 66.0
    There is a growing realization in cognitive science that a theory of embodied intersubjectivity is needed to better account for social cognition. We highlight some challenges that must be addressed by attempts to interpret ‘simulation theory’ in terms of embodiment, and argue for an alternative approach that integrates phenomenology and dynamical systems theory in a mutually informing manner. Instead of ‘simulation’ we put forward the concept of the ‘extended body’, an enactive and phenomenological notion that emphasizes the socially mediated (...)
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  25. E. M. Augusti, A. Melinder & G. Gredebäck (2009). Look Who's Talking: Pre-Verbal Infants' Perception of Face-to-Face and Back-to-Back Social Interactions. Frontiers in Psychology 1:161-161.score: 66.0
    Four-, 6-, and 11-month old infants were presented with movies in which two adult actors conversed about everyday events, either by facing each other or looking in opposite directions. Infants from 6 months of age made more gaze shifts between the actors, in accordance with the flow of conversation, when the actors were facing each other. A second experiment demonstrated that gaze following alone did not cause this difference. Instead the results are consistent with a social cognitive interpretation, suggesting (...)
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  26. Gustav Kuhn Paul A. Skarratt, Geoff G. Cole (2012). Visual Cognition During Real Social Interaction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Laboratory studies of social visual cognition often simulate the critical aspects of joint attention by having participants interact with a computer-generated avatar. Recently, there has been a movement toward examining these processes during authentic social interaction. In this review, we will focus on attention to faces, attentional misdirection, and a phenomenon we have termed social inhibition of return, that have revealed aspects of social cognition that were hitherto unknown. We attribute these discoveries to the use (...)
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  27. Paul A. Skarratt, Geoff G. Cole & Gustav Kuhn (2012). Visual Cognition During Real Social Interaction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Laboratory studies of social visual cognition often simulate the critical aspects of joint attention by having participants interact with a computer-generated avatar. Recently, there has been a movement toward examining these processes during authentic social interaction. In this review, we will focus on attention to faces, attentional misdirection, and a phenomenon we have termed social inhibition of return, that have revealed aspects of social cognition that were hitherto unknown. We attribute these discoveries to the use (...)
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  28. Andrew M. Colman (2003). Cooperation, Psychological Game Theory, and Limitations of Rationality in Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):139-153.score: 64.0
    Rational choice theory enjoys unprecedented popularity and influence in the behavioral and social sciences, but it generates intractable problems when applied to socially interactive decisions. In individual decisions, instrumental rationality is defined in terms of expected utility maximization. This becomes problematic in interactive decisions, when individuals have only partial control over the outcomes, because expected utility maximization is undefined in the absence of assumptions about how the other participants will behave. Game theory therefore incorporates not only rationality but also (...)
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  29. Hanne De Jaegher (2009). Social Understanding Through Direct Perception? Yes, by Interacting. Consciousness & Cognition 18 (2):535-542.score: 63.0
    This paper comments on Gallagher’s recently published direct perception proposal about social cognition [Gallagher, S. (2008a). Direct perception in the intersubjective context. Consciousness and Cognition, 17(2), 535–543]. I show that direct perception is in danger of being appropriated by the very cognitivist accounts criticised by Gallagher (theory theory and simulation theory). Then I argue that the experiential directness of perception in social situations can be understood only in the context of the role of the interaction process in (...)
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  30. B. Roessler & D. Mokrosinska (2013). Privacy and Social Interaction. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (8):771-791.score: 63.0
    This article joins in and extends the contemporary debate on the right to privacy. We bring together two strands of the contemporary discourse on privacy. While we endorse the prevailing claim that norms of informational privacy protect the autonomy of individual subjects, we supplement it with an argument demonstrating that privacy is an integral element of the dynamics of all social relationships. This latter claim is developed in terms of the social role theory and substantiated by an analysis (...)
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  31. Tom Froese & Shaun Gallagher (2012). Getting Interaction Theory (IT) Together: Integrating Developmental, Phenomenological, Enactive, and Dynamical Approaches to Social Interaction. Interaction Studies 13 (3):436-468.score: 63.0
    We argue that progress in our scientific understanding of the `social mind' is hampered by a number of unfounded assumptions. We single out the widely shared assumption that social behavior depends solely on the capacities of an individual agent. In contrast, both developmental and phenomenological studies suggest that the personal-level capacity for detached `social cognition' (conceived as a process of theorizing about and/or simulating another mind) is a secondary achievement that is dependent on more immediate processes of (...)
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  32. Irene M. Pepperberg (2011). Avian Cognition and Social Interaction: Fifty Years of Advances. Interaction Studies 12 (2):195-207.score: 63.0
    The study of animal behavior, and particularly avian behavior, has advanced significantly in the past 50 years. In the early 1960s, both ethologists and psychologists were likely to see birds as simple automatons, incapable of complex cognitive processing. Indeed, the term “avian cognition“ was considered an oxymoron. Avian social interaction was also seen as based on rigid, if sometimes complicated, patterns. The possible effect of social interaction on cognition, or vice versa, was therefore something almost never (...)
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  33. Carrie Childs (2013). From Reading Minds to Social Interaction: Respecifying Theory of Mind. [REVIEW] Human Studies:1-20.score: 63.0
    The aim of this paper is to show some of the limitations of the Theory of Mind approach to interaction compared to a conversation analytic alternative. In the former, mental state terms are examined as words that signify internal referents. This study examines children’s uses of ‘I want’ in situ. The data are taken from a corpus of family mealtimes. ‘I want’ constructions are shown to be interactionally occasioned. The analysis suggests that (a) a referential view of language does (...)
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  34. Kwang‐Kuo Hwang (2014). Culture‐Inclusive Theories of Self and Social Interaction: The Approach of Multiple Philosophical Paradigms. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1).score: 63.0
    In view of the fact that culture-inclusive psychology has been eluded or relatively ignored by mainstream psychology, the movement of indigenous psychology is destined to develop a new model of man that incorporates both causal psychology and intentional psychology as suggested by Vygotsky (1927). Following the principle of cultural psychology: “one mind, many mentalities” (Shweder et al., 1998), the Mandala Model of Self (Hwang, 2011a,b) and Face and Favor Model (Hwang, 1987, 2012) were constructed to represent the universal mechanisms of (...)
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  35. Joel Krueger (2011). Extended Cognition and the Space of Social Interaction. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):643-657.score: 60.0
    The extended mind thesis (EM) asserts that some cognitive processes are (partially) composed of actions consisting of the manipulation and exploitation of environmental structures. Might some processes at the root of social cognition have a similarly extended structure? In this paper, I argue that social cognition is fundamentally an interactive form of space management—the negotiation and management of ‘‘we-space”—and that some of the expressive actions involved in the negotiation and management of we-space (gesture, touch, facial and whole-body expressions) (...)
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  36. Patrick Grüneberg & Kenji Suzuki (2013). A Lesson From Subjective Computing: Autonomous Self-Referentiality and Social Interaction as Conditions for Subjectivity. AISB Proceedings 2012:18-28.score: 60.0
    In this paper, we model a relational notion of subjectivity by means of two experiments in subjective computing. The goal is to determine to what extent a cognitive and social robot can be regarded to act subjectively. The system was implemented as a reinforcement learning agent with a coaching function. To analyze the robotic agent we used the method of levels of abstraction in order to analyze the agent at four levels of abstraction. At one level the agent is (...)
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  37. Aaron V. Cicourel (2006). Cognitive/Affective Processes, Social Interaction, and Social Structure as Representational Re-Descriptions: Their Contrastive Bandwidths and Spatio-Temporal Foci. Mind and Society 5 (1):39-70.score: 60.0
    Research on brain or cognitive/affective processes, culture, social interaction, and structural analysis are overlapping but often independent ways humans have attempted to understand the origins of their evolution, historical, and contemporary development. Each level seeks to employ its own theoretical concepts and methods for depicting human nature and categorizing objects and events in the world, and often relies on different sources of evidence to support theoretical claims. Each level makes reference to different temporal bandwidths (milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, (...)
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  38. Idolina Hernandez (2011). Critical Thinking and Social Interaction in the Online Environment. Inquiry 26 (1):55-61.score: 60.0
    Critical thinking is often assumed to be an integral part of learning in higher education. This learning increasingly takes place in the online environment, where students and faculty are challenged to engage in a collaborative project of critical thinking. This paper seeks to explore the process of critical thinking that is currently taking place online and proposes that social interaction and the social construction of knowledge are integral parts of this process. Discussion boards from economics, history, and (...)
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  39. Thomas S. Smith & Gregory T. Stevens (1996). Emergence, Self-Organization, and Social Interaction: Arousal-Dependent Structure in Social Systems. Sociological Theory 14 (2):131-153.score: 60.0
    The understanding of emergent, self-organizing phenomena has been immensely deepened in recent years on the basis of simulation-based theoretical research. We discuss these new ideas, and illustrate them using examples from several fields. Our discussion serves to introduce equivalent self-organized phenomena in social interaction. Interaction systems appear to be structured partly by virtue of such emergents. These appear under specific conditions: When cognitive buffering is inadequate relative to the levels of stress persons are subjected to, anxiety-spreading has (...)
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  40. Celeste Campos-Castillo & Steven Hitlin (2013). Copresence Revisiting a Building Block for Social Interaction Theories. Sociological Theory 31 (2):168-192.score: 60.0
    Copresence, the idea that the presence of other actors shapes individual behavior, links macro- and micro-theorizing about social interaction. Traditionally, scholars have focused on the physical proximity of other people, assuming copresence to be a given, objective condition. However, recent empirical evidence on technologically mediated (e.g., e-mail), imaginary (e.g., prayer), and parasocial (e.g., watching a television show) interactions challenges classic copresence assumptions. In this article we reconceptualize copresence to provide theoretical building blocks (definitions, assumptions, and propositions) for a (...)
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  41. Matthew L. Brooks & William B. Swann (2011). Is Social Interaction Based on Guile or Honesty? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):17-18.score: 60.0
    Von Hippel & Trivers suggest that people enhance their own self-views as a means of persuading others to adopt similarly inflated perceptions of them. We question the existence of a pervasive desire for self-enhancement, noting that the evidence the authors cite could reflect self-verification strivings or no motive whatsoever. An identity negotiation framework provides a more tenable approach to social interaction.
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  42. Tom Froese, Hiroyuki Iizuka & Takashi Ikegami (2013). From Synthetic Modeling of Social Interaction to Dynamic Theories of Brain–Body–Environment–Body–Brain Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):420 - 421.score: 60.0
    Synthetic approaches to social interaction support the development of a second-person neuroscience. Agent-based models and psychological experiments can be related in a mutually informing manner. Models have the advantage of making the nonlinear brainenvironmentbrain system as a whole accessible to analysis by dynamical systems theory. We highlight some general principles of how social interaction can partially constitute an individual's behavior.
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  43. Johanna Derix, Olga Iljina, Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Ad Aertsen & Tonio Ball (2012). “Doctor” or “Darling”? Decoding the Communication Partner From ECoG of the Anterior Temporal Lobe During Non-Experimental, Real-Life Social Interaction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 60.0
    Human brain processes underlying real-life social interaction in everyday situations have been difficult to study and have, until now, remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether electrocorticography (ECoG) recorded for pre-neurosurgical diagnostics during the daily hospital life of epilepsy patients could provide a way to elucidate the neural correlates of non-experimental social interaction. We identified time periods in which patients were involved in conversations with either their respective life partners (Condition 1; C1) or attending physicians (Condition (...)
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  44. Nienke M. Moolenaar, Peter J. C. Sleegers, Sjoerd Karsten & Alan J. Daly (2012). The Social Fabric of Elementary Schools: A Network Typology of Social Interaction Among Teachers. Educational Studies 38 (4):355-371.score: 60.0
    While researchers are currently studying various forms of social network interaction among teachers for their impact on educational policy implementation and practice, knowledge on how various types of networks are interrelated is limited. The goal of this study is to understand the dimensionality that may underlie various types of social networks in schools. We assessed seven types of social interaction using social network data of 775 educators from 53 Dutch elementary schools. The quadratic assignment (...)
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  45. R. Smead (forthcoming). The Role of Social Interaction in the Evolution of Learning. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axt047.score: 60.0
    It is generally thought that cognition evolved to help us navigate complex environments. Social interactions make up one part of a complex environment, and some have argued that social settings are crucial to the evolution of cognition. This article uses the methods of evolutionary game theory to investigate the effect of social interaction on the evolution of cognition broadly construed as strategic learning or plasticity. I delineate the conditions under which social interaction alone, apart (...)
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  46. Melinda Bonnie Fagan (2010). Stems and Standards: Social Interaction in the Search for Blood Stem Cells. Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):67 - 109.score: 58.0
    This essay examines the role of social interactions in the search for blood stem cells, in a recent episode of biomedical research. Linked to mid-20th century cell biology, genetics and radiation research, the search for blood stem cells coalesced in the 1960s and took a developmental turn in the late 1980s, with significant ramifications for immunology, stem cell and cancer biology. Like much contemporary biomedical research, this line of inquiry exhibits a complex social structure and includes several prominent (...)
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  47. Bertram F. Malle (2005). Folk Theory of Mind: Conceptual Foundations of Human Social Cognition. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 225-255.score: 57.0
    The human ability to represent, conceptualize, and reason about mind and behavior is one of the greatest achievements of human evolution and is made possible by a “folk theory of mind” — a sophisticated conceptual framework that relates different mental states to each other and connects them to behavior. This chapter examines the nature and elements of this framework and its central functions for social cognition. As a conceptual framework, the folk theory of mind operates prior to any particular (...)
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  48. Dong-Hee Shin & Hyungseung Choo (2012). Modeling the Acceptance of Socially Interactive Robotics: Social Presence in Humanrobot Interaction. Interaction Studies 12 (3):430-460.score: 57.0
    Based on an integrated theoretical framework, this study analyzes user acceptance behavior toward socially interactive robots focusing on the variables that influence the users' attitudes and intentions to adopt robots. Individuals' responses to questions about attitude and intention to use robots were collected and analyzed according to different factors modified from a variety of theories. The results of the proposed model explain that social presence is key to the behavioral intention to accept social robots. The proposed model shows (...)
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  49. Elliot C. Brown & Martin Brüne (2012). The Role of Prediction in Social Neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (147):147-147.score: 54.0
    Research has shown that the brain is constantly making predictions about future events. Theories of prediction in perception, action and learning suggest that the brain serves to reduce the discrepancies between expectation and actual experience, i.e. by reducing the prediction error. Forward models of action and perception propose the generation of a predictive internal representation of the expected sensory outcome, which is matched to the actual sensory feedback. Shared neural representations have been found when experiencing one’s own and observing others’ (...)
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  50. Joel Krueger & John Michael (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (81):1-14.score: 54.0
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological, and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. We distinguish two ways of conceptualizing the role of such coupling processes in social cognition: strong and moderate interactionism. According to strong interactionism (SI), low-level coupling processes are alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. Moderate interactionism(MI) on the other hand, is an integrative approach. Its guiding (...)
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