Search results for 'Social Justice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Liza Mügge (2012). Women in Transnational Migrant Activism: Supporting Social Justice Claims of Homeland Political Organizations. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):65-81.score: 270.0
    This article studies the conceptions of social justice of women active in transnational migrant politics over a period of roughly 20 years in the Netherlands. The novel focus on migrant women reveals that transnational politics is almost completely male-dominated and -directed. Two of the exceptions found in this article include a leftist and a Kurdish women organization supporting the communist cause in the 1980s and the Kurdish struggle in the 1990s in Turkey, respectively. In both organizations gender equality (...)
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  2. Janine M. Brodie (2007). Reforming Social Justice in Neoliberal Times. Studies in Social Justice 1 (2):93-107.score: 270.0
    This article unfolds in three stages. First, it locates the emergence of modern conceptions of social justice in industrializing Europe, and especially in the discovery of the “social,” which provided a particular idiom for the liberal democratic politics for most of the twentieth century. Second, the article links this particular conception of the social to the political rationalities of the postwar welfare state and the identity of the social citizen. Finally, the article discusses the myriad (...)
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  3. Marina Morrow & Julia Weisser (2012). Towards a Social Justice Framework of Mental Health Recovery. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):27-43.score: 270.0
    In this paper we set out the context in which experiences of mental distress occur with an emphasis on the contributions of social and structural factors and then make a case for the use of intersectionality as an analytic and methodological framework for understanding these factors. We then turn to the political urgency for taking up the concept of recovery and argue for the importance of research and practice that addresses professional domination of the field, and that promotes ongoing (...)
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  4. Gary Craig (2007). Social Justice in a Multicultural Society: Experience From the UK. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):93-108.score: 270.0
    Social justice is a contested concept. For example, some on the left argue for equality of outcomes, those on the right for equality of opportunities, and there are differing emphases on the roles of state, market and individual in achieving a socially just society. These differences in emphasis are critical when it comes to examining the impact that public policy has on minority ethnic groups. Social justice should not be culture-blind any more than it can be (...)
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  5. Leah Briones (2011). Rights with Capabilities: Towards a Social Justice Framework for Migrant Activism. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):127-143.score: 270.0
    The paradigm of rights, established throughout the academic, policy and migrant activism arenas, governs the protection of vulnerable migrant workers against abuse. To what extent this approach has achieved social justice for the migrant worker in the current global political economy climate is, however, uncertain. In analyzing the use of rights in migrant activism in Hong Kong, this paper shows the limitation of rights in the migrant experience at the same time as it shows how a new paradigm (...)
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  6. John McMurtry (2011). Human Rights Versus Corporate Rights: Life Value, the Civil Commons and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):11-61.score: 270.0
    This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding (...)
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  7. John McMurtry (2011). Human Rights Versus Corporate Rights: Understanding Life Value, the Civil Commons, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):2011.score: 270.0
    This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding (...)
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  8. Michael Reisch (2007). Social Justice and Multiculturalism: Persistent Tensions in the History of US Social Welfare and Social Work. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):67-92.score: 270.0
    Social justice has been a central normative component of U.S. social welfare and social work for over a century, although the meaning and implications of the term have often been ambiguous. A major source of this ambiguity lies in the conflict between universalist views of social justice and those which focus on achieving justice for specific groups. This conflict has been masked by several long-standing assumptions about the relationship between social justice (...)
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  9. Andrew Gibson (2009). Just Above the Fray - Interpretive Social Criticism and the Ends of Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):102-118.score: 258.0
    The article lays down the broad strokes of an interpretive approach to social criticism. In developing this approach, the author stresses the importance of both a pluralistic notion of social justice and a rich ideal of personal growth. While objecting to one-dimensional conceptions of social justice centering on legal equality, the author develops the idea of there being multiple "spheres of justice", including the spheres of "care" and "merit". Each of these spheres, he argues, (...)
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  10. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). An African Theory of Social Justice. In Camilla Boisen & Matt Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in the History of Political and Social Thought: Finding A Fair Share. Routledge.score: 246.0
    A comprehensive account of justice grounded on salient Afro-communitarian values, the article attempts to unify views about the distribution of economic resources, the protection of human rights and the provision of social recognition as ultimately being about proper ways to value loving relationships.
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  11. Rodney G. Peffer, A Modified Rawlsian Theory of Social Justice: 'Justice as Fair Rights'.score: 240.0
    In my 1990 work – Marxism, Morality, and Social Justice – I argued for four modifications of Rawls’s principles of social justice and rendered a modified version of his theory in four principles, the first of which is the Basic Rights Principle demanding the protection of people’s security and subsistence rights. In both his Political Liberalism (1993) and Justice as Fairness (2001) Rawls explicitly refers to my version of his theory, clearly accepting three of my (...)
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  12. John O'Neill & Martin O'Neill (2012). Social Justice and the Future of Flood Insurance. Joseph Rowntree Foundation.score: 240.0
    What would be a fair model for flood insurance? Catastrophic flooding has become increasingly frequent in the UK and, with climate change, is likely to become even more frequent in the future. With the UK's current flood insurance regime ending in 2013, we argues that: -/- - there is an overwhelming case for rejecting a free market in flood insurance after 2013; - this market-based approach threatens to leave many thousands of properties uninsurable, leading to extensive social blight; - (...)
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  13. David Miller (1976/1979). Social Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This book explores the various aspects of social justice--to each according to his rights, to each acording to his desert, and to each according to his need--comparing the writings of Hume, Spencer, and Kropotkin. Miller demonstrates that there are radical differences in outlook on social justice between societies, and that these differences can be explained by reference to features of the social structure.
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  14. Jules L. Coleman, Christopher W. Morris & Gregory S. Kavka (eds.) (1998). Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Greg Kavka (1947-1994) was a prominent and influential figure in contemporary moral and political philosophy. The new essays in this volume are concerned with fundamental issues of rational commitment and social justice to which Kavka devoted his work as a philosopher. The essays take Kavka's work as a point of departure and seek to advance the respective debates. The topics include: the relationship between intention and moral action as part of which Kavka's famous 'toxin puzzle' is a focus (...)
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  15. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). All Justice is Social but It's Not All Social Justice. Philosophia 41 (2):383-395.score: 240.0
    I take social injustice to be injustice perpetrated on members of society by laws and public social practices. I take social justice to be the struggle to right social injustice. After explaining these ideas, I then address the question: why are so many people opposed to the very idea of social justice? I offer a number of explanations, among them, that to acknowledge that there is social injustice in one’s society often requires (...)
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  16. K. D. Irani & Morris Silver (eds.) (1995). Social Justice in the Ancient World. Greenwood Press.score: 240.0
    This edited collection focuses on the problem of social justice, or, more particularly, how the demand for social justice was articulated and implemented in ...
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  17. John A. Clark (2006). Social Justice, Education and Schooling: Some Philosophical Issues. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):272 - 287.score: 240.0
    Social justice is a key concept in current education policy and practice. It is, however, a problematic one in its application to schooling. This paper begins with a critique of the account of social justice offered by Gewirtz followed by an alternative philosophical notion based on the perfect world argument and the just society where equality is to the fore. This leads on to an exploration of what it is to be an educated citizen, consideration of (...)
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  18. Melanie Walker (2003). Framing Social Justice in Education: What Does the 'Capabilities' Approach Offer? British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (2):168 - 187.score: 240.0
    This paper develops a framework for conceptualising social justice in education, drawing particularly on Martha Nussbaum's (2000) capabilities approach. The practical case for consideration is that of widening participation and pedagogical implications in higher (university) education in England. While the paper supports the value and usefulness of Nussbaum's list of ten capabilities for developing a more radical and challenging language and practice for higher education pedagogies, it also argues that her approach is limited. Other ways of conceptualising (...) justice are also required in order to develop adjudicating theories which enable us to judge which practices take us closer to social justice. An argument is made for 'bivalent' theorising which integrates individual and institutional development and agents and social structures. (shrink)
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  19. Cletus S. Brauer (2013). Just Sustainability? Sustainability and Social Justice in Professional Codes of Ethics for Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):875-891.score: 240.0
    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today’s most pressing and important issues, engineering codes of ethics and their paramountcy clause, which contains those values most important to engineering and to what it means to be an engineer, do not yet put either concept on a par with the safety, (...)
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  20. C. Clare Hinrichs & Patricia Allen (2008). Selective Patronage and Social Justice: Local Food Consumer Campaigns in Historical Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):329-352.score: 240.0
    In the early 2000s, the development of local food systems in advanced industrial countries has expanded beyond creation and support of farmers’ markets and community supported agriculture farms and projects to include targeted Buy Local Food campaigns. Non-governmental groups in many U.S. places and regions have launched such campaigns with the intent of motivating and directing consumers toward more local food purchasing in general. This article examines the current manifestations and possibilities for social justice concerns in Buy Local (...)
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  21. James R. Kluegel (2008). Social Justice and Political Change: Public Opinion in Capitalist and Post-Communist States. Aldinetransaction.score: 240.0
    Social Justice and Political Change, involves the collaboration of thirty social scientists in twelve countries, and represents broad-ranging comparative ...
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  22. Simon Hope (2013). Neo-Aristotelian Social Justice: An Unanswered Question. Res Publica 19 (2):157-172.score: 240.0
    In this paper I assess the possibility of advancing a modern conception of social justice under neo-Aristotelian lights, focussing primarily on conceptions that assert a fundamental connection between social justice and eudaimonia. After some preliminary remarks on the extent to which a neo-Aristotelian account must stay close to Aristotle’s own, I focus on Martha Nussbaum’s sophisticated neo-Aristotelian approach, which I argue implausibly overworks the aspects of Aristotle’s thought it appeals to. I then outline the shape of (...)
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  23. Anne West (2006). School Choice, Equity and Social Justice: The Case for More Control. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (1):15 - 33.score: 240.0
    This paper focuses on school choice and the extent to which admissions to publicly-funded secondary schools in England address issues of equity and social justice. It argues that schools with responsibility for their own admissions are more likely than others to act in their own self interest by 'selecting in' or 'creaming' particular pupils and 'selecting out' others. Given this, it is argued that individual schools should not be responsible for admissions. Instead, admissions should be the responsibility of (...)
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  24. Willem de Lint (2009). Security, Exclusion, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 3 (1):1-7.score: 240.0
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  25. Martin Woods (2012). Exploring the Relevance of Social Justice Within a Relational Nursing Ethic. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):56-65.score: 240.0
    Abstract In the last few decades, a growing number of commentators have questioned the appropriateness of the 'justice view' of ethics as a suitable approach in health care ethics, and most certainly in nursing. Essentially, in their ethical deliberations, it is argued that nurses do not readily adopt the high degree of impartiality and objectivity that is associated with a justice view; instead their moral practices are more accurately reflected through the use of alternative approaches such as relational (...)
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  26. Jeffrey Noonan (2011). Life Value and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):1-10.score: 240.0
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  27. M. Gabriela Torres (2009). Imagining Social Justice Amidst Guatemala's Post-Conflict Violence. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):1-11.score: 240.0
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  28. Cosmin Irimies (2013). The Willey-Blackwell Companion to Religion and Social Justice. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (34):251-257.score: 240.0
    Review of Michael Palmer & Stanley M. Burgess (eds.), The Willey-Blackwell Companion to Religion and Social Justice , (Oxford: Willey-Blackwell, 2012).
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  29. Nelarine Cornelius & James Wallace (2010). Cross-Sector Partnerships: City Regeneration and Social Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):71 - 84.score: 240.0
    In this article, the ability of partnerships to generate goods that enhance the quality-of-life of socially and economically deprived urban communities is explored. Drawing on Rawl's study on social justice [Rawls, J.: 1971, A Theory of Justice (Harvard University Press, Cambridge)] and Sen's capabilities approach [Sen, A.: 1992, Inequality Re-Examined (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA); 1999, Development as Freedom (Oxford University Press, Oxford); 2009, The Idea of Justice (Ellen Lane, London)], we undertake an ethical evaluation of (...)
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  30. Jill Harrison (2008). Lessons Learned From Pesticide Drift: A Call to Bring Production Agriculture, Farm Labor, and Social Justice Back Into Agrifood Research and Activism. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):163-167.score: 240.0
    I use the case of pesticide drift to discuss the neoliberal shift in agrifood activism and its implications for public health and social justice. I argue that the benefits of this shift have been achieved at the cost of privileging certain bodies and spaces over others and absolving the state of its responsibility to ensure the conditions of social justice. I use this critical intervention as a means of introducing several opportunities for strengthening agrifood research and (...)
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  31. Jill Jacobs (2011). Where Justice Dwells: A Hands-on Guide to Doing Social Justice in Your Jewish Community. Jewish Lights Pub..score: 240.0
    Introduction: the road ahead -- Pt. I. Envisioning a just place -- 1. Why jewish social justice? -- 2. Place matters -- 3. The ideal city -- Pt. II. Principles and practice of social justice -- 4. Storytelling for social justice -- 5. Creating an integrated Jewish life -- 6. Partnerships and power -- 7. Sacred words: engaging with text and tradition -- Pt. III. Taking action -- 8. Direct service -- 9. Giving and (...)
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  32. Sayantani DasGupta, Alice Fornari, Kamini Geer, Louisa Hahn, Vanita Kumar, Hyun Joon Lee, Susan Rubin & Marji Gold (2006). Medical Education for Social Justice: Paulo Freire Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):245-251.score: 240.0
    Although social justice is an integral component of medical professionalism, there is little discussion in medical education about how to teach it to future physicians. Using adult learning theory and the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, medical educators can teach a socially-conscious professionalism through educational content and teaching strategies. Such teaching can model non-hierarchical relationships to learners, which can translate to their clinical interactions with patients. Freirian teaching can additionally foster professionalism in both teachers and learners by (...)
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  33. Clarence Sholé Johnson (2003). Cornel West & Philosophy: The Quest for Social Justice. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Cornel West's reputation as a public and celebrity intellectual has overshadowed his important contributions to philosophy. Professor Clarence Shole Johnson provides a rectification of this situation in this benchmark, thought-provoking book. After a brief biographical sketch, Johnson leads us through a comprehensive examination of West's philosophy from his conceptions of pragmatism, existentialism, Marxism, and Prophetic Christianity to his persuasive writings on black-Jewish relations, affirmative action, and the role of black intellectuals. Special focus is given to West's writings on ethics and (...)
     
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  34. Richard Marens (2007). Returning to Rawls: Social Contracting, Social Justice, and Transcending the Limitations of Locke. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):63 - 76.score: 228.0
    A generation ago, the field of business ethics largely abandoned analyzing the broader issue of social justice to focus upon more micro concerns. Donaldson applied the social contract tradition of Locke and Rawls to the ethics of management decision-making, and with Dunfee, has advanced this project ever since. Current events suggest that if the field is to remain relevant it needs to return to examining social and economic fairness, and Rawl's approach to social contracting suggests (...)
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  35. Lisa S. Parker (2012). In Sport and Social Justice, Is Genetic Enhancement a Game Changer? Health Care Analysis 20 (4):328-346.score: 222.0
    The possibility of genetic enhancement to increase the likelihood of success in sport and life’s prospects raises questions for accounts of sport and theories of justice. These questions obviously include the fairness of such enhancement and its relationship to the goals of sport and demands of justice. Of equal interest, however, is the effect on our understanding of individual effort, merit, and desert of either discovering genetic contributions to components of such effort or recognizing the influence of (...) factors on the development and exercise of individual effort. This paper analyzes arguments about genetic enhancement with the goal of raising questions about how sport and justice regard unchosen, undeserved inequalities and what is assumed to be their opposite—namely, the exercise and results of individual effort. It is suggested that contemplating enhancement of natural assets previously outside human control may reinforce recognition of responsibility to intervene with regard to social advantages so as to support individual effort and improve individuals’ life prospects. (shrink)
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  36. Howard Mcgary (1997). Racism, Social Justice, and Interracial Coalitions. Journal of Ethics 1 (3):249-264.score: 216.0
    Is racism in the United States alive and well? Do African Americans still experience alienation and social injustice because of racism? What are the various proposals that have been tendered by conservatives and liberals for overcoming racism? Can interracial coalitions be used as an effective tool for combating racism? I attempt to answer these questions in part by offering an analysis of Cornel West''s interracial coalition proposal in Race Matters.
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  37. Kees Schuyt (1998). The Sharing of Risks and the Risks of Sharing: Solidarity and Social Justice in the Welfare State. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):297-311.score: 216.0
    Solidarity as a social phenomenon means a sharing of feelings, interests, risks and responsibilities. The Western-European Welfare State can be seen as an organized system of solidarity, historically grown from group solidarity among workers, later between workers and employers, moving towards solidarity between larger social groups: between healthy people and the sick, between the young and the elderly, between the employed and the unemployed. This sharing of risks at a societal level however, has revealed the risks of sharing. (...)
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  38. Julie M. Aultman (2013). Don't Let the Bedbugs Bite: The Cimicidae Debacle and the Denial of Healthcare and Social Justice. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):417-427.score: 216.0
    Although bedbug infestation is not a new public health problem, it is one that is becoming more alarming among healthcare professionals, public health officials, and ethicists given the magnitude of patients who may be denied treatment, or who are unable to access treatment, especially those underserved populations living in low income housing. Efforts to quarantine and eradicate Cimicidae have been and should be made, but such efforts require costly interventions. The alternative, however, can further exacerbate the already growing problems of (...)
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  39. Samia Bano & Jennifer L. Pierce (2013). Personal Narratives, Social Justice, and the Law. Feminist Legal Studies 21 (3):225-239.score: 216.0
    North American writer Joan Didion’s eloquent testimonial speaks to the significance of storytelling in our lives. Personal storiesmake our lives meaningful. Part of this is because our stories, wittingly or not, become the means through which we fashion our identities for listeners. Or, as scholars from many disciplines have argued, identity and selfhoodare narrative accomplishments. In this formulation, an individual constructs a sense of self by telling stories or “personal narratives,” which describe “the evolution of an individual life over time (...)
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  40. Lucinda Vandervort (1987). Social Justice in the Modern Regulatory State: Duress, Necessity and the Consensual Model in Law. Law and Philosophy 6 (2):205 - 225.score: 216.0
    This paper examines the role of the consensual model in law and argues that if substantive justice is to be the goal of law, the use of individual choice as a legal criterion for distributive and retributive purposes must be curtailed and made subject to substantive considerations. Substantive justice arguably requires that human rights to life, well-being, and the commodities essential to life and well-being, be given priority whenever a societal decision is made. If substantive justice is (...)
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  41. Sharon Gewirtz (2006). Towards a Contextualized Analysis of Social Justice in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (1):69–81.score: 210.0
  42. Gavin Fridell (2007). Fair-Trade Coffee and Commodity Fetishism: The Limits of Market-Driven Social Justice. Historical Materialism 15 (4):79-104.score: 210.0
  43. Jennifer Lapum, Neda Hamzavi, Katarina Veljkovic, Zubaida Mohamed, Adriana Pettinato, Sarabeth Silver & Elizabeth Taylor (2012). A Performative and Poetical Narrative of Critical Social Theory in Nursing Education: An Ending and Threshold of Social Justice. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):27-45.score: 210.0
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  44. Terry Lovell (ed.) (2007). (Mis)Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu. Routledge.score: 210.0
    This collection of essays considers some of the conceptual and philosophical contentions that Fraser?s model has provoked and presents some compelling examples ...
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  45. Lawrence R. Cima & Thomas L. Schubeck (2001). Self-Interest, Love, and Economic Justice: A Dialogue Between Classical Economic Liberalism and Catholic Social Teaching. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (3):213 - 231.score: 210.0
    This essay seeks to start a dialogue between two traditions that historically have interpreted the economy in opposing ways: the individualism of classic economic liberalism (CEL), represented by Adam Smith and Milton Friedman, and the communitarianism of Catholic social teaching (CST), interpreted primarily through the teachings of popes and secondarily the U.S. Catholic bishops. The present authors, an economist and a moral theologian who identify with one or the other of the two traditions, strive to clarify objectively their similarities (...)
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  46. Jill Jacobs (2009). There Shall Be No Needy: Pursuing Social Justice Through Jewish Law & Tradition. Jewish Lights Pub..score: 210.0
    Confront the most pressing issues of twenty-first-century America in this fascinating book, which brings together classical Jewish sources, contemporary policy ...
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  47. James Scott Johnston (2009). Prioritizing Rights in the Social Justice Curriculum. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (2):119-133.score: 210.0
  48. Paula Godoy-Paiz (2009). Women in Guatemala's Metropolitan Area: Violence, Law, and Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):27-47.score: 210.0
    In this article I examine the legal framework for addressing violence against women in post war Guatemala. Since the signing of the Peace Accords in 1996, judicial reform in Guatemala has included the passing of laws in the area of women‘s human rights, aimed at eliminating discrimination and violence against women. These laws constitute a response to and have occurred concurrently to an increase in violent crime against women, particularly in the form of mass rapes and murders. Drawing on fieldwork (...)
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  49. Barbara Pesut, Frances Beswick, Carole A. Robinson & Joan L. Bottorff (2012). Philosophizing Social Justice in Rural Palliative Care: Hayek's Moral Stone? Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):46-55.score: 210.0
  50. L. T. Hobhouse (1922/1993). The Elements of Social Justice. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.score: 210.0
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