Search results for 'Social Medicine ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Why the international market for pharmaceuticals fails & What to Do About It : A. Comparison of Two Alternative Approaches to Global Ethics (2008). Reflecting the Impact of Ethical Theory : Contractarianism, Ethics, and Economics. Christoph Luetge / Civilising the Barbarians? : On the Apparent Necessity of Moral Surpluses; Soeren Buttkereit and Ingo Pies / Social Dilemmas and the Social Contract; Peter Koslowski / Ethical Economy as the Economy of Ethics and as the Ethics of the Market Economy; Ingo Pies and Stefan Hielscher. In Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.), Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 560.0
  2. David T. Ozar (1985). Social Ethics, the Philosophy of Medicine, and Professional Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 333.0
    The social ethics of medicine is the study and ethical analysis of social structures which impact on the provision of health care by physicians. There are many such social structures. Not all these structures are responsive to the influence of physicians as health professionals. But some social structures which impact on health care are prompted by or supported by important preconceptions of medical practice. In this article, three such elements of the philosophy of (...) are examined in terms of the negative impact on health care of the social structures to which they contribute. The responsibilities of the medical profession and of individual physicians to work to change these social structures are then examined in the light of a theory of profession. (shrink)
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  3. Dana Cook Grossman & Heinz Valtin (eds.) (1999). Great Issues for Medicine in the Twenty-First Century: Ethical and Social Issues Arising Out of Advances in the Biomedical Sciences. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 327.0
     
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  4. Alan Cribb (2005). Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context. Oxford University Press.score: 291.0
    What is health policy for? In Health and the Good Society, Alan Cribb addresses this question in a way that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. His core argument is that biomedical ethics should draw upon public health values and ethics; specifically, he argues that everybody has some share of responsibility for health, including a responsibility for promoting greater health equality. In the process, Cribb argues for a major rethink of the whole project of health education.
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  5. Audrey Leathard & Susan Goodinson-McLaren (eds.) (2007). Ethics: Contemporary Challenges in Health and Social Care. Policy Press.score: 288.0
    This book redresses the balance by examining theory, research, policy, and practice in both fields.
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  6. Bernard Barber (ed.) (1978). Medical Ethics and Social Change. American Academy of Political and Social Science.score: 282.0
     
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  7. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 279.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects is (...)
     
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  8. Rein Vos & Dick L. Willems (2000). Technology in Medicine: Ontology, Epistemology, Ethics and Social Philosophy at the Crossroads. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (1):1-7.score: 261.0
    In reference to the different approaches in philosophy(of medicine) of the nature of (medical) technology,this article introduces the topic of this specialissue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, that is,the way the different forms of medical technologyfunction in everyday medical practice. The authorselaborate on the active role technology plays inshaping our views on disease, illness, and the body,whence in shaping our world.
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  9. Alister Browne, Katharine Browne, Ezekiel J. Emanual, Joseph J. Fins, Colin Gavaghan, Christine Grady & Leonard C. Groopman (2007). William Andereck, MD, is an Internist at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, California, Where He Chairs the Ethics Committee and is Founder and Codirector of the Program in Medicine and Human Values. R. Blake Brown, Ph. D., is a Social Science and Humanities Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellow at Saint Mary's University and a Research Associate at The. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:1-2.score: 252.0
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  10. Kathleen Nolan (forthcoming). Ethics, Medical Research, and Medicine: Commercialism Versus Environmentalism and Social Justice (Review). American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):69-70.score: 243.0
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  11. Kathleen Nolan (2003). Review of Andrew Thompson and Norman Temple, Eds., 2001.Ethics, Medical Research, and Medicine: Commercialism Versus Environmentalism and Social Justice. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):69-70.score: 243.0
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  12. Peregrine Horden (1997). Medicine and Social Ethics D. W. Amundsen: Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. Pp. Xv + 392. Baltimore, MD and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996. Cased, £33. ISBN: 0-8018-5109-2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (02):344-346.score: 243.0
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  13. Not Available Not Available (1998). Ethics, Medicine and Social Science - An Interdisciplinary Workshop. Ethik in der Medizin 10 (2):121-123.score: 243.0
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  14. Peregrine Horden (1997). Medicine and Social Ethics. The Classical Review 47 (02):344-.score: 243.0
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  15. Simon Btesh (ed.) (1972). Recent Progress in Biology and Medicine, its Social and Ethical Implications: Proceedings of a Round Table Conference on Science Policy and Biomedical Research, Unesco House, Paris, 4-6 September, 1972 = les Récents Progrès De La Biologie Et De La Médecine Et Leur Portée Sociale Et Éthique: Comptes Rendus Du Colloque Sur La Politique Scientifique Et La Recherche Biomédicale, Maison De L'unesco, Paris, 4-6 Septembre, 1972. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences.score: 231.0
     
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  16. Martien Pijnenburg (2002). Humane Healthcare as a Theme for Social Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):245-252.score: 225.0
    The concept of ‘humane healthcare’ cannot and may not be limited to a personal virtue. For elucidating its meaning and making it functional as a critical ethical criterion for healthcare as a social institution, it is necessary to reflect on the social, cultural, and historical conditions in which modern healthcare finds its offspring and its further development. Doing this is the object and aim of social ethics. Social ethics in itself covers a broad area (...)
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  17. Marcel Mertz (2007). Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Challenges of Ethical Justification. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):329-345.score: 220.0
    With the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) increasing in western societies, questions of the ethical justification of these alternative health care approaches and practices have to be addressed. In order to evaluate philosophical reasoning on this subject, it is of paramount importance to identify and analyse possible arguments for the ethical justification of CAM considering contemporary biomedical ethics as well as more fundamental philosophical aspects. Moreover, it is vital to provide adequate analytical instruments for this task, (...)
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  18. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.score: 210.0
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the (...)
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  19. Victor R. Fuchs (2011). Who Shall Live?: Health, Economics, and Social Choice. World Scientific.score: 210.0
    Problems and choices -- Who shall live? -- The physician : the captain of the team -- The hospital : the house of hope -- Drugs : the key to modern medicine -- Paying for medical care.
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  20. Robert Sparrow (2009). The Social Impacts of Nanotechnology: An Ethical and Political Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):13-23.score: 207.0
    This paper attempts some predictions about the social consequences of nanotechnology and the ethical issues they raise. I set out four features of nanotechnology that are likely to be important in determining its impact and argue that nanotechnology will have significant social impacts in—at least—the areas of health and medicine, the balance of power between citizens and governments, and the balance of power between citizens and corporations. More importantly, responding to the challenge of nanotechnology will require confronting (...)
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  21. J. Savulescu (1998). Two Worlds Apart: Religion and Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):382-384.score: 207.0
    In a recent article entitled, Requests "for inappropriate" treatment based on religious beliefs, Orr and Genesen claim that futile treatment should be provided to patients who request it if their request is based on a religious belief. I claim that this implies that we should also accede to requests for harmful or cost-ineffective treatments based on religious beliefs. This special treatment of religious requests is an example of special pleading on the part of theists and morally objectionable discrimination against atheists. (...)
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  22. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.score: 207.0
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving women's health and rights around the world. It was internationally endorsed by a United Nations conference in 1994, but remains controversial because of the challenge it presents to conservative agencies: it challenges policies of suppressing public discussion on human sexuality and regulating its private expressions. Reproductive Health and Human Rights is designed to equip healthcare providers and administrators to integrate ethical, legal, and human rights principles in protection (...)
     
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  23. D. Hill (1987). On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):220-221.score: 204.0
    Religion and medicine -- Theology and medical ethics -- The profession and its integrity -- Life and its sanctity -- Health and healing -- Death and its (in)dignity -- Nature and its mastery -- Care of patients and their suffering -- Respect for persons and their agency -- Contraception -- Technological reproduction -- Genetic control -- Abortion -- Choosing death and letting die -- Care of neonates -- The physician-patient relationship: advise and consent -- Psychiatric care: professional commitments (...)
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  24. Christos Lynteris (2013). The Spirit of Selflessness in Maoist China: Socialist Medicine and the New Man. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 201.0
    The book narrates how, called to embody this selfless spirit, medical doctors were trapped in a spiral between cultivation and abolition, leading to the explosion of ideology during the Cultural Revolution.
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  25. Melanie Phillips (1985). Doctors' Dilemmas: Medical Ethics and Contemporary Science. Methuen.score: 201.0
     
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  26. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Internal Morality of Clinical Medicine: A Paradigm for the Ethics of the Helping and Healing Professions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):559 – 579.score: 198.0
    The moral authority for professional ethics in medicine customarily rests in some source external to medicine, i.e., a pre-existing philosophical system of ethics or some form of social construction, like consensus or dialogue. Rather, internal morality is grounded in the phenomena of medicine, i.e., in the nature of the clinical encounter between physician and patient. From this, a philosophy of medicine is derived which gives moral force to the duties, virtues and obligations of (...)
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  27. Klaus Hoeyer, Lisa Dahlager & Niels Lynöe (2006). Ethical Conflicts During the Social Study of Clinical Practice: The Need to Reassess the Mutually Challenging Research Ethics Traditions of Social Scientists and Medical Researchers. Clinical Ethics 1 (1):41-45.score: 198.0
    When anthropologists and other social scientists study health services in medical institutions, tensions sometimes arise as a result of the social scientists and health care professionals having different ideas about the ethics of research. In order to resolve this type of conflict and to facilitate mutual learning, we describe two general categories of research ethics framing: those of anthropology and those of medicine. The latter focuses on protection of the individual through the preservation of autonomy (...)
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  28. Eugenia M. Porto (1990). Social Context and Historical Emergence: The Underlying Dimension of Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).score: 198.0
    I argue that work in medical ethics which attempts to humanize medicine without examining hidden assumptions (about medicine's ontology, explanations, goals, relationships) has the dehumanizing effect of legitimating practices which treat persons as abstractions. After illustrating the need to reexamine the field of medical ethics and the doctor-patient relationship in particular, I use Foucault's work to provide a social, historical framework for discussion. This background begins to demonstrate that doctor-patient relationships cannot be made satisfactory by (...)
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  29. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 198.0
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in (...)
     
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  30. Osamu Muramoto (2014). Retrospective Diagnosis of a Famous Historical Figure: Ontological, Epistemic, and Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):10.score: 198.0
    The aim of this essay is to elaborate philosophical and ethical underpinnings of posthumous diagnosis of famous historical figures based on literary and artistic products, or commonly called retrospective diagnosis. It discusses ontological and epistemic challenges raised in the humanities and social sciences, and attempts to systematically reply to their criticisms from the viewpoint of clinical medicine, philosophy of medicine, particularly the ontology of disease and the epistemology of diagnosis, and medical ethics. The ontological challenge focuses (...)
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  31. Paul Steinberg (2003). Study Guide to Jewish Ethics: A Reader's Companion to Matters of Life and Death, to Do the Right and the Good, Love Your Neighbor and Yourself. The Jewish Publication Society.score: 198.0
    This companion to Elliot Dorff's three books on Jewish ethics -- Matters of Life and Death , To Do the Right and the Good , and Love Your Neighbor and Yourself -- is designed for group as well as individual study. Through suggested readings from Dorff's books, probing questions, lively discussion topics, and simple writing exercises, readers will be able to analyze and clarify their own positions on a host of controversial issues: sex, surrogate motherhood, adoption, family abuse, responsibilities (...)
     
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  32. Torbjörn Tännsjö (1999). Coercive Care: The Ethics of Choice in Health and Medicine. Routledge.score: 195.0
    Coercive Care: The Ethics of Choice in Health and Medicine asks probing and challenging questions regarding the use of coercion in health care and social services. This book combines philosophical analysis with comparative studies of social policy and law in a large number of industrialized countries and proposes an ideal of judicial security on a global scale.
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  33. Thomas K. McElhinney & Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: Its Role and Influence in the Conception and Evolution of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):291-317.score: 189.0
    For ten years, 1971–1981, the Institute onHuman Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a keyrole in the development of Bioethics as afield. We have written this history andanalysis to bring to new generations ofBioethicists information about the developmentof their field within both the humanitiesdisciplines and the health professions. Thepioneers in medical humanities and ethics cametogether with medical professionals in thedecade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics wasa fully recognized discipline. We show the rolethat IHVM programs played in defining (...)
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  34. Martyn D. Pickersgill (2013). From 'Implications' to 'Dimensions': Science, Medicine and Ethics in Society. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (1):31-42.score: 189.0
    Much bioethical scholarship is concerned with the social, legal and philosophical implications of new and emerging science and medicine, as well as with the processes of research that under-gird these innovations. Science and technology studies (STS), and the related and interpenetrating disciplines of anthropology and sociology, have also explored what novel technoscience might imply for society, and how the social is constitutive of scientific knowledge and technological artefacts. More recently, social scientists have interrogated the emergence of (...)
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  35. M. H. Kottow (1999). In Defence of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.score: 189.0
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics is a (...)
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  36. Joëlle Vailly, Janina Kehr & Jörg Niewöhner (eds.) (2011). De la Vie Biologique à la Vie Sociale: Approches Sociologiques Et Anthropologiques. La Découverte.score: 183.0
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  37. Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.) (1992). Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press.score: 180.0
    The fields of medical ethics, bioethics, and women's studies have experienced unprecedented growth in the last forty years. Along with the rapid pace of development in medicine and biology, and changes in social expectations, moral quandaries about the body and social practices involving it have multiplied. Philosophers are uniquely situated to attempt to clarify and resolves these questions. Yet the subdiscipline of bioethics still in large part reflects mainstream scholars' lack of interest in gender as a (...)
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  38. Garry C. Gray (2013). The Ethics of Pharmaceutical Research Funding: A Social Organization Approach. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):629-634.score: 180.0
    This paper advances a social organization approach to examining unethical behavior. While unethical behaviors may stem in part from failures in individual morality or psychological blind spots, they are both generated and performed through social interactions among individuals and groups. To illustrate the value of a social organization approach, a case study of a medical school professor's first experience with pharmaceutical-company-sponsored research is provided in order to examine how funding arrangements can constrain research integrity. The case illustrates (...)
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  39. James Lindemann Nelson & JHilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) (1999). Meaning and Medicine: A Reader in the Philosophy of Health Care. Routledge.score: 180.0
    Most available resources for teachers and students in biomedical ethics are based on a notion of medicine and of how to understand and illuminate its ethical problems that is at least two decades old. Meaning and Medicine dramatically expands the repertoire of resources for teachers and students of bioethics. In addition to providing fresh perspectives on both traditional and emerging questions in bioethics, this Reader focuses on questions in social philosophy, epistemology, and metaphysics as they are (...)
     
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  40. Henry Pratt Newsholme (1937). Christian Ethics and Social Health. London, J. Heritage.score: 180.0
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  41. Christian Ståhl, Ellen MacEachen & Katherine Lippel (2014). Ethical Perspectives in Work Disability Prevention and Return to Work: Toward a Common Vocabulary for Analyzing Stakeholders' Actions and Interactions. Journal of Business Ethics 120 (2):237-250.score: 180.0
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  42. Hartmut Remmers & Helen Kohlen (eds.) (2010). Bioethics, Care and Gender: Herausforderungen für Medizin, Pflege Und Politik. Universitätsverlag Osnabrück.score: 177.0
    In this book the relevance of language, perception and context are highlighted by discussing issues of end-of-life care, prenatal diagnosis, allocation problems as well as ethical conflicts in clinical practice.
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  43. Norman Daniels (1985). Just Health Care. Cambridge University Press.score: 174.0
    How should medical services be distributed within society? Who should pay for them? Is it right that large amounts should be spent on sophisticated new technology and expensive operations, or would the resources be better employed in, for instance, less costly preventive measures? These and others are the questions addreses in this book. Norman Daniels examines some of the dilemmas thrown up by conflicting demands for medical attention, and goes on to advance a theory of justice in the distribution of (...)
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  44. Bradford H. Gray (1981). Human Subjects in Medical Experimentation: A Sociological Study of the Conduct and Regulation of Clinical Research. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 174.0
     
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  45. Wojciech Bołoz & Ewa Wolnicz-Pawłowska (eds.) (2004). Życie I Zdrowie Człowieka W Tradycji I Kulturze Polskiej: Materiały Konferencji "Problematyka Życia I Zdrowia W Tradycji I Kulturze Polskiej", Warszawa, 16 Października 2003. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Kardynała Stefana Wyszyńskiego.score: 174.0
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  46. Ivan Illich (1976/1982). Medical Nemesis: The Expropriation of Health. Pantheon Books.score: 174.0
     
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  47. R. D. Orr & L. B. Genesen (1997). Requests for "Inappropriate" Treatment Based on Religious Beliefs. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):142-147.score: 171.0
    Requests by patients or their families for treatment which the patient's physician considers to be "inappropriate" are becoming more frequent than refusals of treatment which the physician considers appropriate. Such requests are often based on the patient's religious beliefs about the attributes of God (sovereignty, omnipotence), the attributes of persons (sanctity of life), or the individual's personal relationship with God (communication, commands, etc). We present four such cases and discuss some of the basic religious tenets of the three Abrahamic faith (...)
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  48. Jacob M. Rose (2007). Corporate Directors and Social Responsibility: Ethics Versus Shareholder Value. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (3):319 - 331.score: 162.0
    This paper reports on the results of an experiment conducted with experienced corporate directors. The study findings indicate that directors employ prospective rationality cognition, and they sometimes make decisions that emphasize legal defensibility at the expense of personal ethics and social responsibility. Directors recognize the ethical and social implications of their decisions, but they believe that current corporate law requires them to pursue legal courses of action that maximize shareholder value. The results suggest that additional ethics (...)
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  49. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 162.0
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous research participant may have significant (...)
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  50. K. Gregory Jin & Ronald G. Drozdenko (2010). Relationships Among Perceived Organizational Core Values, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethics, and Organizational Performance Outcomes: An Empirical Study of Information Technology Professionals. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):341 - 359.score: 162.0
    This study is an extension of our recent ethics research in direct marketing (2003) and information technology (2007). In this study, we investigated the relationships among core organizational values, organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and organizational performance outcome. Our analysis of online survey responses from a sample of IT professionals in the United States indicated that managers from organizations with organic core values reported a higher level of social responsibility relative to managers in organizations with mechanistic (...)
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