Search results for 'Social Welfare ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Why the international market for pharmaceuticals fails & What to Do About It : A. Comparison of Two Alternative Approaches to Global Ethics (2008). Reflecting the Impact of Ethical Theory : Contractarianism, Ethics, and Economics. Christoph Luetge / Civilising the Barbarians? : On the Apparent Necessity of Moral Surpluses; Soeren Buttkereit and Ingo Pies / Social Dilemmas and the Social Contract; Peter Koslowski / Ethical Economy as the Economy of Ethics and as the Ethics of the Market Economy; Ingo Pies and Stefan Hielscher. In Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.), Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company
  2.  24
    Chong Ju Choi, Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty & Sae Won Kim (2007). Consumer Trust, Social Marketing and Ethics of Welfare Exchange. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):17 - 23.
    The global corporate scandals such as Enron, Worldcom and Global Crossing have raised fundamental issues of business ethics as well as economic, social and anthropological questions concerning the nature of business competition and global capitalism. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to introduce the concept of "welfare exchange" to the existing notions of economic, social and anthropological notions of business and exchange in markets and society in the 21st century. Global competition and (...)
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  3.  23
    Sarah Banks, Richard Hugman, Lynne Healy, Vivienne Bozalek & Joan Orme (2008). Global Ethics for Social Work: Problems and Possibilities—Papers From the Ethics & Social Welfare Symposium, Durban, July 2008. Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (3):276-290.
    This piece comprises short presentations given by contributors to a symposium organized by the journal Ethics & Social Welfare on the theme of global ethics for social work. The contributors offer their reflections on the extent to which universally accepted international statements of ethical principles in social work are possible or useful, engaging with debates about cultural diversity, relativism and the relevance of human rights in non-Western countries.
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  4.  14
    Rana Jawad (2007). Human Ethics and Welfare Particularism: An Exploration of the Social Welfare Regime in Lebanon. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (2):123-146.
    This paper presents a profile of the welfare regime in Lebanon which is posited on the twin precepts of human ethics and welfare particularism. It highlights the key role that moral values play in the conceptualization and implementation of social policy, as well as in the measurement of welfare outcomes. This is marked by the dominance of duty, traditionalism and elitism in the ethics of religious welfare in Lebanon. The paper argues that the (...)
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  5.  5
    Sarah Banks (2010). Interprofessional Ethics: A Developing Field? Notes From the Ethics & Social Welfare Conference, Sheffield, UK, May 2010. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (3):280-294.
    This article discusses the nature of interprofessional ethics and some of the ethical issues and challenges that arise when practitioners from different professions work closely together in the fields of health and social care. The article draws on materials from a conference on this theme, covering issues of confidentiality and information sharing in practice and research with vulnerable people; challenges for teaching and learning about ethics in interprofessional settings; the potential of virtue ethics and an ethic (...)
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  6.  14
    Janet Shapiro (2012). Ethically Informed Practice with Families Formed Via International Adoption: Linking Care Ethics with Narrative Approaches to Social Welfare Practice. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (4):333-350.
    Many authors have described the ethical issues associated with international adoption for all members of the adoption triad, including adoptive parents, birth parents and the adopted child, and for both sending and receiving countries. This paper explores how political variants of care ethics, combined with a narrative approach to practice, can be used as a conceptual framework for ethically informed practice with families formed via international adoption. Political variants of care ethics foreground the particularized needs of the individual, (...)
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  7.  2
    Stefan Cojocaru (2010). Social Projectionism: A Vision For New Ethics In Social Welfare. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (13):32-38.
    This article approaches social projectionism as an orientation within the new post-modern epistemologies, starting from its principles. At the same time, the author presents some phenomena generated by the post-modern perspectives opened by the new ideologies that produce new ethical orientations in social practice. These visions have made profound changes in the way the social services user is seen, the contextualisation of social practice, the volatility of social programmes and the development of the public-private partnership (...)
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  8.  34
    Sarah Banks (2008). Ethics and Social Welfare: The State of Play. Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (1):1-9.
  9.  1
    Sarah Banks (2009). Ethics That Work? A Critical Review of Ethics and Values in Teaching and Practice—Papers From the Ethics & Social Welfare Conference, London, 10 November 2008: Editorial Introduction. [REVIEW] Ethics 3 (1):3--1.
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  10.  5
    David Campbell, Barrie Craven & Kevin Lawler (2002). Social Welfare, Positivism and Business Ethics. Business Ethics 11 (3):268–281.
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  11. David Campbell, Barrie Craven & Kevin Lawler (2002). Social Welfare, Positivism and Business Ethics. Business Ethics: A European Review 11 (3):268-281.
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  12. Chong Ju Choi, Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty & Sae Won Kim (2007). Consumer Trust, Social Marketing and Ethics of Welfare Exchange. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):17-23.
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  13.  21
    Ashley Piggins (2007). Population Issues in Social Choice Theory, Welfare Economics, and Ethics, by Charles Blackorby, Walter Bossert, and David Donaldson. Cambridge University Press, 2005, VIII+369 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):256-260.
  14.  2
    Kerstin Svensson (2012). Practising Social Work Ethics Around the World: Cases and Commentaries. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (4):418-419.
    (2012). Practising Social Work Ethics Around the World: Cases and Commentaries. Ethics and Social Welfare: Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 418-419. doi: 10.1080/17496535.2012.735818.
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  15.  12
    Audrey Leathard & Susan Goodinson-McLaren (eds.) (2007). Ethics: Contemporary Challenges in Health and Social Care. Policy Press.
    This book redresses the balance by examining theory, research, policy, and practice in both fields.
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  16.  13
    Liz Lloyd (2010). The Individual in Social Care: The Ethics of Care and the 'Personalisation Agenda' in Services for Older People in England. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (2):188-200.
    The ethic of care provides not only a basis for understanding relationships of care at the micro level but also a potent form of political ethics, relevant to the development of welfare services. Williams (2001), for example, argues that the concept of care has the capacity to be a central referent in social policy?a point at which social and cultural transformations meet with the changing relations of welfare (Williams 2001, p. 470). English social care (...)
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  17.  4
    Mel Gray & Terence Lovat (2007). Horse and Carriage: Why Habermas's Discourse Ethics Gives Virtue a Praxis in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):310-328.
    In this paper we suggest an alternative approach to ethics in social work: virtue ethics. We argue that Habermas's theory of communicative action and discourse ethics needs to be supplemented with virtue ethics to provide an account useful to social work. In these times, sensitivity to others is needed for social work to succeed as a profession interested in combating the complacency, self-interest and lack of compassion evident in cutbacks to social (...) programmes and the resultant concerns with outcomes and efficiencies that have all but obliterated care and compassion. We see in Habermas a furthering of Aristotelian and Thomist philosophy, most importantly with respect to his focus on emancipatory knowing?the critically reflective knower who knows self as the person doing the knowing. Habermas's distinction between values (objective), ethics (social) and morals (subjective) makes the province of emancipatory knowing (his epistemological theory) consistent with his moral theory?morality is personal. (shrink)
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  18.  18
    Donald Dickson (2009). When Law and Ethics Collide: Social Control in Child Protective Services. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):264-283.
    Social welfare workers in the protective services field?among them social workers, psychologists, and psychiatrists?are expected to follow the laws of the state in which they practice, but are also bound by their professional code of ethics. Often this does not present a problem, but at times ethical and legal expectations differ. This is particularly problematic where the professionals may be seen as agents of control, reporting possible child abuse, conducting child abuse investigations, inspecting homes, monitoring families, (...)
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  19.  8
    Martin Gill & Peter Jordan (2012). UK Conference Report: Confidentiality and Collaboration—The Ethics of Information Sharing in Health and Social Care. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (1):74-78.
    (2012). UK Conference Report: Confidentiality and Collaboration—The Ethics of Information Sharing in Health and Social Care. Ethics and Social Welfare: Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 74-78. doi: 10.1080/17496535.2012.651888.
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  20.  9
    Steven R. Smith (2013). Liberal Ethics and Well-Being Promotion in the Disability Rights Movement, Disability Policy, and Welfare Practice. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):20-35.
    The disability rights movement has often been closely associated with the liberal values of individual choice and independence, or the?ethics of agency?, where enhancing the capacity to make autonomous decisions in various policy and practice-based contexts is said to facilitate disabled people's well-being. Nevertheless, other liberal values are derived from what will be termed here the?ethics of self-acceptance?. The latter is more disguised in liberalism and the DRM, as rather than emphasising the capacity to make autonomous decisions, self-acceptance (...)
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  21.  41
    Dennis R. Cooley (2009). Understanding Social Welfare Capitalism, Private Property, and the Government's Duty to Create a Sustainable Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):351-369.
    No one would deny that sustainability is necessary for individual, business, and national survival. How this goal is to be accomplished is a matter of great debate. In this article I will show that the United States and other developed countries have a duty to create sustainable cities, even if that is against a notion of private property rights considered as an absolute. Through eminent domain and regulation, developed countries can fulfill their obligations to current and future generations. To do (...)
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  22.  16
    Cletus S. Brauer (2013). Just Sustainability? Sustainability and Social Justice in Professional Codes of Ethics for Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):875-891.
    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today’s most pressing and important issues, engineering codes of ethics and their paramountcy clause, which contains those values most important to engineering and to what it means to be an engineer, do not yet put either concept on a par with the safety, (...)
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  23.  6
    L. J. Spence & F. Perrini (2009). Practice and Politics: Ethics and Social Responsibility in SMEs in the European Union. African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):20.
    In this paper we outline the status quo of ethics and social responsibility in small and medium sized enterprises in the European Union . Social issues and SMEs is an established topic of research and subject of policy-making in Europe, and thus in this paper we are able to draw on existing activities to summarise what we know about the topic. We describe the important position given to SMEs and entrepreneurship as drivers of the economy through job (...)
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  24. Ndungi wa Mungai, Gidraph G. Wairire & Emma Rush (2014). The Challenges of Maintaining Social Work Ethics in Kenya. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (2):170-186.
    Little research has been published that is specifically relevant to professional social work ethics in Kenya. This paper seeks to address this gap in the literature. One of the major challenges is maintaining professional social work ethics, which are predominantly Western-based, in an African cultural context. This paper argues for an Afrocentric approach, specifically proposing Ubuntu as a helpful concept that could guide the development of professional social work ethics that are relevant to African (...)
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  25.  8
    Jon Vegar Hugaas (2010). Evil's Place in the Ethics of Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (3):254-279.
    This article argues that the concept of evil is needed in normative ethics in general as well as in the professional ethics of social work. Attention is drawn to certain shortcomings in the classical theories of normative ethics when it comes to recognizing the profound destructiveness of certain types of acts that exceed the mere ?bad? or ?wrong? applied in the most common theories of moral philosophy. Having established the category of morally evil acts in general, (...)
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  26.  20
    Charles R. Clark (1993). Social Responsibility Ethics: Doing Right, Doing Good, Doing Well. Ethics and Behavior 3 (3 & 4):303 – 327.
    The ethics of social responsibility is discussed in reference to six case vignettes drawn from forensic psychology. A definitional model of social responsibility is proposed, and two unequal components of the concept - respect for the individual and concern for social welfare - are identified. The sources of ethical conflict in regard to social responsibility are enumerated. Scholarly criticism of the value orientation of forensic psychology is reviewed, and forensic psychology is contrasted with (...) policy advocacy efforts made by organized psychology. The social responsibility obligations of psychologists in the microethical sphere, where their actions affect individuals, are diffentiated from the obligations psychology has when operating in the macroethical sphere of social policy. The ethical problems inherent in policy advocacy brought about by individual psychologists working with individuals are underscored: the inevitable element of deception, the violation of role integrity, and the circumvention of social structures and institutions that safeguard the rights of individuals. (shrink)
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  27.  5
    Jonathan Parker, Bridget Penhale & David Stanley (2011). Research Ethics Review: Social Care and Social Science Research and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):380-400.
    This paper considers concerns that social care research may be stifled by health-focused ethical scrutiny under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the requirement for an ?appropriate body? to determine ethical approval for research involving people who are deemed to lack capacity under the Act to make decisions concerning their participation and consent in research. The current study comprised an online survey of current practice in university research ethics committees (URECs), and explored through semi-structured interviews the views of (...)
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  28.  11
    Helen McLaren (2007). Exploring the Ethics of Forewarning: Social Workers, Confidentiality and Potential Child Abuse Disclosures. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (1):22-40.
    This article reports on exploratory research into social workers? perceptions and actions regarding ?forewarning? clients of their child abuse reporting obligations as a limitation of confidentiality at relationship onset. Ethical principles and previous research on forewarning are discussed prior to stating the research methods and presenting findings. Data obtained from South Australian social workers engaged in human service work with adult family members articulate a strong desire to practise in accordance with professional codes of ethics. However, the (...)
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  29.  4
    Diana Part & Carole Comben (2007). The NHS Research Ethics Process and Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (1):97-101.
    In September 2004 a local authority council commissioned the University of Dundee to undertake a small evaluation of a pilot social work post set up in 2003 and located in the palliative care team of the local Health Trust. The evaluation was to enable decisions to be made regarding the continuation and establishment of this specialist post into the financial year beginning 2005 and beyond. The university was asked to consult clients of the social worker, their relatives and (...)
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  30.  14
    Hartley Dean (2011). The Ethics of Migrant Welfare. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):18-35.
    International migration poses a dilemma for capitalist welfare states. This paper considers the ethical dimensions of that dilemma. It begins by addressing two questions associated with the provision of social rights for migrants: first, the extent to which differential forms of social citizenship may be associated with processes of civic stratification; second, the ambiguous nature of the economic, social and cultural rights components of the international human rights framework. It then proceeds to discuss, on the (...)
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  31.  17
    Derek Clifford (2013). Ethics, Politics and the Social Professions: Reading Iris Marion Young. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):36-53.
    This paper seeks to describe and evaluate the work of the late Iris Marion Young as a critical reference point for values and ethics in the social professions. Her credentials are both experiential and theoretical, having studied analytical then postmodern and phenomenological thought, publishing a series of influential books on political and ethical concepts from a critical feminist position. Her theory and practice were closely related: she actively campaigned for feminist and related social causes for many years. (...)
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  32.  4
    Heather Peters (2008). Theory, Science, Ideology and Ethics in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (2):172-182.
    Social work and other professions struggle with the roles of knowledge and values in the study of society and human lives, and in professional practice. Discussions of this topic range from those who see relatively clear distinctions between these concepts and those for whom the lines between the concepts are blurred. For those who separate theory and knowledge from values and ethics there is further discussion in the literature on which is the appropriate foundation for social work (...)
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  33.  9
    Martin Sexton (2009). Fine Lines and Hard Choices: Adult Protection and Social Work Ethics. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (1):79-86.
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  34.  3
    Jim Elder-Woodward (2014). ‘Living Well’ Vs Neoliberal Social Welfare. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):306-313.
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  35.  21
    Appa Rao Korukonda & Chenchu Ramaiah T. Bathala (2004). Ethics, Equity, and Social Justice in the New Economic Order: Using Financial Information for Keeping Social Score. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (1):1-15.
    In the present world order unbridled forces of free market capitalism are frequently cited for much of the social injustice, inequity, and disparity of wealth between the rich and the poor. Although history''s verdict in favor of the free markets could hardly be harsher or clearer, it is clear that after the initial wave of triumph, the free market paradigm has developed some cracks in its façade. What marks the trail of such sustained and pronounced move toward free markets (...)
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  36.  38
    John Raymond Boatright (2009). Ethics and the Conduct of Business. Pearson Prentice Hall.
    Ethics in the world of business -- Welfare, rights, and justice -- Equality, liberty, and virtue -- Whistle-blowing -- Trade secrets and conflict of interest -- Privacy -- Discrimination and affirmative action -- Employment rights -- Occupational health and safety -- Marketing, advertising, and product safety -- Ethics in finance -- Corporate social responsibility -- Corporate governance and accountability -- International business ethics.
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  37. Hugh McLaughlin & Steven Shardlow (2009). Different Cultures, Different Ethics? Research Governance and Social Care. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (1):4-17.
    This article focuses on the governance and ethical conduct of research within the domain of social work and social care. Globally, research in this domain appears less well regulated than those in the domains of health care. Within the United Kingdom, the Westminster government is implementing a Research GovernanceFramework for Social Care in England (RGF Social Care). This article locates this development in a broader global context and uses as an example a regionally based implementation to (...)
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  38.  3
    Mekada Graham (2007). The Ethics of Care, Black Women and the Social Professions: Implications of a New Analysis. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (2):194-206.
    In recent years a growing body of literature on the ethics of care has made significant contributions to understanding the multiple dimensions of care. Feminist theories provide the resource for this interdisciplinary research in which there has been scant attention given to black women's approaches to moral deliberations and understandings of care. Although there are differing interests and diversity among black women, this article seeks to disrupt current frameworks surrounding the ethics of care and discusses a more relevant (...)
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  39.  12
    Chris Trotter & Tony Ward (2013). Involuntary Clients, Pro-Social Modelling and Ethics. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):74-90.
    Workers with involuntary clients influence the behaviour of their clients. One of the methods by which workers influence their clients relates to the way they model, encourage or reinforce their comments and behaviours. Practitioners may be aware or unaware of this process and of the extent to which it can impact on clients. This paper describes the process of modelling and reinforcement and discusses some of the ethical issues it raises. It suggests some guidelines by which the process may be (...)
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  40.  12
    Annie Pullen-Sansfaçon (2011). Ethics and Conduct in Self-Directed Groupwork: Some Lessons for the Development of a More Ethical Social Work Practice. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):361-379.
    This paper compares and contrasts the impact and the interface of different sets of values held by social care practitioners in their decision-making process with regard to ethical dilemmas. Specifically, it explores some of the fundamental distinctions between self-directed groupworkers and other qualified social workers practising in both statutory and voluntary sectors. The methodology is qualitative and draws upon a Grounded Theory process. In contrasting the contribution of different sets of values in decision making, we found that participants, (...)
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  41.  4
    Denise Turner & Rebecca Webb (2012). Ethics and/or Ethics in Qualitative Social Research: Negotiating a Path Around and Between the Two. Ethics and Social Welfare (4):1-14.
    This article explores the process of university Ethical Review both as lived experience and as part of institutional governance at an English university. The article uses Blackburn's distinction between ethics and Ethics (Ethics?A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001) as a framework to examine the themes of ?vulnerability?, ?power? and ?relationships?. These themes are analysed closely both within the institutional and the fieldwork contexts, attempting to include the perspectives of all those involved in the research (...)
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  42.  2
    Sarah Banks (forthcoming). Everyday Ethics in Professional Life: Social Work as Ethics Work. Ethics and Social Welfare:1-18.
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  43.  3
    Lynne Healy & Hugo Kamya (2014). Ethics and International Discourse in Social Work: The Case of Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Legislation. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (2):151-169.
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  44.  4
    Stefan Brown & Frank Keating (2015). The Film Club: Reflections on the Use of Contemporary Film to Teach Ethics to Social Work Students. Ethics and Social Welfare 9 (3):312-321.
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  45.  5
    Alison Higgs (2014). Social Work, Law and Ethics. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (4):426-427.
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  46.  1
    Sharon Walker (2015). Relationship-Based Teaching: A Relational Ethics Led Approach to Teaching Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 9 (4):394-402.
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  47.  7
    Derek Clifford (2014). Limitations of Virtue Ethics in the Social Professions. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (1):2-19.
  48.  3
    Sacha Kendall & Richard Hugman (2013). Social Work and the Ethics of Involuntary Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Postmodern Approach. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (4):1-16.
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  49.  2
    Lester Parrott (2014). Culture, Values and Ethics in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (4):428-429.
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  50.  2
    Sheila Smith (2014). Ethics and Values in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (4):423-424.
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