Search results for 'Social acceptance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Nick Lin-Hi & Igor Blumberg (2012). Managing the Social Acceptance of Business. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (2):247-263.
    The public support of corporations is continuously declining. The view that the system of free enterprise and profit-making are at odds with societal interests isbecoming more and more prevalent. Business’s associated loss of social acceptance poses a serious threat to the future viability of the system of free enterprise. Thus, corporate leaders face the task of regaining and sustainably securing the social acceptance of business. This paper presents three interrelated business ethics competencies which corporate leaders require (...)
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  2.  6
    Birgit Boogaard, Bettina Bock, Simon Oosting, Johannes Wiskerke & Akke van der Zijpp (2011). Social Acceptance of Dairy Farming: The Ambivalence Between the Two Faces of Modernity. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):259-282.
    Society’s relationship with modern animal farming is an ambivalent one: on the one hand there is rising criticism about modern animal farming; on the other hand people appreciate certain aspects of it, such as increased food safety and low food prices. This ambivalence reflects the two faces of modernity: the negative (exploitation of nature and loss of traditions) and the positive (progress, convenience, and efficiency). This article draws on a national survey carried out in the Netherlands that aimed at gaining (...)
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  3.  16
    K. Boogaard Birgit, B. Bock Bettina, J. Oosting Simon, S. C. Wiskerke Johannes & J. der Zijpp Akkvane (forthcoming). Social Acceptance of Dairy Farming: The Ambivalence Between the Two Faces of Modernity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.
    Society’s relationship with modern animal farming is an ambivalent one: on the one hand there is rising criticism about modern animal farming; on the other hand people appreciate certain aspects of it, such as increased food safety and low food prices. This ambivalence reflects the two faces of modernity: the negative (exploitation of nature and loss of traditions) and the positive (progress, convenience, and efficiency). This article draws on a national survey carried out in the Netherlands that aimed at gaining (...)
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  4.  22
    C. R. Austin (1978). Bisexuality and the Problem of its Social Acceptance. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (3):132-137.
    Professor Austin explores four main areas in this paper. First of all he outlines the physical development of sex differentiation in the embryo. He develops this by describing the clinical manifestations of abnormality which can appear at that stage. Professor Austin points out that there are relatively few people with abnormalities and that those who do show homosexual tendencies are not noticeably different from the norm in terms of their sexual equipment and hormone levels. It is much more likely that (...)
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  5.  15
    Sanaa Askool & Keiichi Nakata (2011). A Conceptual Model for Acceptance of Social CRM Systems Based on a Scoping Study. AI and Society 26 (3):205-220.
    Recent developments in information technology and Web services have increased the potential for creating more rapid and extensive social networks and business relationships. Web 2.0 technologies, commonly referred to as online social media, have become important tools within the growth of information and communication technology (ICT) in the last few years. Web 2.0 tools such as blogs, Wiki and other services, which are widely used by individuals, also have an effect on customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Consequently, (...) CRM (SCRM) is emerging as a new paradigm for integrating social networking in more traditional CRM systems. However, social CRM is yet to be fully utilised as a value-adding tool in improving customer relationships. This paper reports on a scoping study that explored the current situation of CRM adoption in banking industry in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this paper is to identify the factors that may influence businesses and customers’ adoption of social CRM. Various models have been proposed to study ICT and information systems acceptance and usage. This paper proposes an enhancement to one of these models, specifically the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), by incorporating a range of factors identified in the social networking and business relationships literature believed to influence social CRM adoption. In particular, the model proposes that familiarity, caring behaviour, sharing information and perceived trustworthiness can generate cognitive view about the relationships between employees and customers. This view besides Web 2.0 features may offer a way of analysing the potential adoption of social CRM. (shrink)
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  6. Noritoshi Tanida (1997). The Social Acceptance Of Euthanasia Does Not Stem From Patient's Autonomy In Japan. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 7 (2):43-46.
    Attitudes towards euthanasia and death-with-dignity of people who participated in the seminar on "life" were studied with questionnaires before and after a lecture regarding these issues. The results indicated that the number of the participants who accepted patient's autonomy increased after the lecture. However, the respondents who accepted the idea of patient's autonomy were less likely to accept euthanasia in general or wish for it in their own case. These data suggest that in this Japanese group, the acceptance of (...)
     
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  7.  4
    Nina Lansbury Hall (2014). Can the “Social Licence to Operate” Concept Enhance Engagement and Increase Acceptance of Renewable Energy? A Case Study of Wind Farms in Australia. Social Epistemology 28 (3-4):219-238.
    Social licence to operate (SLO) is the ongoing acceptance or approval for a development that is granted by the local community and other stakeholders. From the current media and political attention on Australian wind farms, it appears that many specific wind farms, or indeed the industry as a whole, may not hold an SLO with affected stakeholders. This research was undertaken to examine whether the SLO might be a useful framework to enhance engagement and increase societal understanding of (...)
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  8.  5
    T. Wilkie (2002). Gene Technology and Social Acceptance: W P Von Wartburg, J Liew. University Press of America Inc, 1999, US$41.50, Pp 338. ISBN 076181325X. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):56-56.
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  9. Micheal Pelt (2000). Walter P. Von Wartburg and Julian Liew, Gene Technology and Social Acceptance Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (3):228-230.
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  10. Raimo Tuomela, Collective Acceptance, Social Institutions, and Social Reality.
    The paper presents an account of social institutions on the basis of collective acceptance. Basically, collective acceptance by some members of a group involves the members’ collectively coming to hold and holding a relevant social attitude (a “we-attitude”), viz. either one in the intention family of concepts or one in the belief family. In standard cases the collective acceptance must be in the “we-mode”, viz. performed as a group member, and involve that it be meant (...)
     
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  11.  23
    Raimo Tuomela (2001). Collective Acceptance and Social Reality. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 11:161-171.
    Many social properties and notions are collectively made. Two collectively created aspects of the social world have been emphasized in recent literature. The first is that of the performative character of many social things (entities, properties). The second is the reflexive nature of many social concepts. The present account adds to this list a third feature, the collective availability or “for-groupness” of collective social items. It is a precise account of social notions and (...) facts in terms of collective appearance. The collective acceptance account has ontological implications in that it accepts mind-independent, group-dependent, and simply mind-dependent social facts. (shrink)
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  12.  28
    Dong-Hee Shin & Hyungseung Choo (2011). Modeling the Acceptance of Socially Interactive Robotics: Social Presence in Human–Robot Interaction. Interaction Studies 12 (3):430-460.
    Based on an integrated theoretical framework, this study analyzes user acceptance behavior toward socially interactive robots focusing on the variables that influence the users' attitudes and intentions to adopt robots. Individuals' responses to questions about attitude and intention to use robots were collected and analyzed according to different factors modified from a variety of theories. The results of the proposed model explain that social presence is key to the behavioral intention to accept social robots. The proposed model (...)
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  13. Raimo Tuomela (2002). The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a systematic philosophical and conceptual study of the notion of a social practice. Raimo Tuomela explains social practices in terms of the interlocking mental states of the agents; he shows how social practices are 'building blocks of society'; and he offers a clear and powerful account of the way in which social institutions are constructed from these building blocks as established, interconnected sets of social practices with a special new social status. His (...)
     
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  14.  12
    Carol Levine (2005). Acceptance, Avoidance, and Ambiguity: Conflicting Social Values About Childhood Disability. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):371-383.
    : Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families—parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they (...)
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  15. Raimo Tuomela (2002). The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a systematic philosophical and conceptual study of the notion of a social practice. Raimo Tuomela explains social practices in terms of the interlocking mental states of the agents; he shows how social practices are 'building blocks of society'; and he offers a clear and powerful account of the way in which social institutions are constructed from these building blocks as established, interconnected sets of social practices with a special new social status. His (...)
     
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  16.  8
    Raimo Tuomela & Wolfgang Balzer (2002). Collective Acceptance and Collective Attitudes: On the Social. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction. Cambridge University Press 269.
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  17.  26
    Frank A. Hindriks (2006). Acceptance-Dependence: A Social Kind of Response-Dependence. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):481–498.
    Neither Johnston's nor Wright's account of response-dependence offers a complete picture of response-dependence, as they do not apply to all concepts that are intrinsically related to our mental responses. In order to (begin to) remedy this situation, a new conception of response-dependence is introduced that I call "acceptance-dependence". This account applies to concepts such as goal, constitutional, and money, the first two of which have mistakenly been taken to be response-dependent in another sense. Whereas on Johnston's and Wright's accounts (...)
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  18. Dong-Hee Shin & Hyungseung Choo (2011). Modeling the Acceptance of Socially Interactive Robotics: Social Presence in Human–Robot Interaction. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 12 (3):430-460.
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  19. Raimo Tuomela (2007). The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a systematic philosophical and conceptual study of the notion of a social practice. Raimo Tuomela explains social practices in terms of the interlocking mental states of the agents; he shows how social practices are 'building blocks of society'; and he offers a clear and powerful account of the way in which social institutions are constructed from these building blocks as established, interconnected sets of social practices with a special new social status. His (...)
     
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  20. Raimo Tuomela (2007). The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a systematic philosophical and conceptual study of the notion of a social practice. Raimo Tuomela explains social practices in terms of the interlocking mental states of the agents; he shows how social practices are 'building blocks of society'; and he offers a clear and powerful account of the way in which social institutions are constructed from these building blocks as established, interconnected sets of social practices with a special new social status. His (...)
     
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  21.  42
    Raimo Tuomela & Wolfgang Balzer (1998). Collective Acceptance and Collective Social Notions. Synthese 117 (2):175-205.
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  22.  13
    Frank Hindriks (2015). Do Social Institutions Require Collective Acceptance? Metascience 24 (3):467-470.
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  23.  1
    Jianqin Cao, Ruolei Gu, Xuejing Bi, Xiangru Zhu & Haiyan Wu (2015). Unexpected Acceptance? Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Manifest Their Social Expectancy in ERPs During Social Feedback Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  24.  20
    Seumas Miller (2003). Review of Raimo Tuomela, Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (5).
  25.  3
    Mark W. Baldwin, Jodene R. Baccus & Marina Milyavskaya (2010). Computer Game Associating Self-Concept to Images of Acceptance Can Reduce Adolescents' Aggressiveness in Response to Social Rejection. Cognition and Emotion 24 (5):855-862.
  26. Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). Raimo Tuomela, The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (6):409-411.
     
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  27. David F. Hall & Bibb LatanÉ (1975). Acceptance and Preference for Inter- and Intraspecies Social Contact in Rats. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (3):245-247.
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  28.  1
    Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2005). Tuomela, Raimo, The Philosophy of Social Practices – A Collective Acceptance View, Cambridge University Press, 2002, 274 Pp. + Xi. [REVIEW] SATS 6 (1).
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  29. Margaret T. Hodgen (1957). The Acceptance of Histories: Toward a Perspective for Social ScienceKenneth E. Bock. Isis 48 (4):473-475.
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  30.  4
    Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai (2006). Public, Experts, and Acceptance of Advanced Medical Technologies: The Case of Organ Transplant and Gene Therapy in Japan. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):203-214.
    In 1997, after long social debates, the Japanese government enacted a law on organ transplantation from brain-dead bodies. Since 1993, on gene therapy, administrative agencies have issued a series of guidelines. This study seeks to elucidate when people became aware of the issues and when they formed their opinions on organ transplant and gene therapy. At the same time, it aims to examine at which point in time experts, those in university ethical committees and in academic societies, consider these (...)
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  31.  15
    David Copp (2015). Social Glue and Norms of Sociality. Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3387-3397.
    If we are going to understand morality, it is important to understand the nature of societies. What is fundamental to them? What is the glue that holds them together? What is the role of shared norm acceptance in constituting a society? Michael Bratman’s account of modest sociality in his book, Shared Agency, casts significant light on these issues. Bratman’s account focuses on small-scale interactions, but it is instructive of the kinds of factors that can enter into explaining sociality more (...)
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  32.  5
    Arto Laitinen (2011). Recognition, Acknowledgement, and Acceptance. In Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill 309-347.
    In this chapter I distinguish between a) recognition of persons, b) normative acknowledgement and c) institution-creating acceptance. All of these go beyond a fourth, merely descriptive sense of the word “recognition,” namely identification or re-identification of something as something. I distinguish four aspects of "taking someone as a person": R1 A Belief that the other is a person, and can engage in agency-regarding relations.R2 Moral Opinion that the choice whether and when to engage with persons is ethically significant.R3 Willingness (...)
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  33.  19
    Jean-Pierre Béland, Johane Patenaude, Georges Legault, Patrick Boissy & Monelle Parent (2011). The Social and Ethical Acceptability of NBICs for Purposes of Human Enhancement: Why Does the Debate Remain Mired in Impasse? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (3):295-307.
    The emergence and development of convergent technologies for the purpose of improving human performance, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, information sciences, and cognitive science (NBICs), open up new horizons in the debates and moral arguments that must be engaged by philosophers who hope to take seriously the question of the ethical and social acceptability of these technologies. This article advances an analysis of the factors that contribute to confusion and discord on the topic, in order to help in understanding why arguments (...)
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  34.  3
    Karine Charry, Patrick De Pelsmacker & Claude L. Pecheux (2014). How Does Perceived Effectiveness Affect Adults’ Ethical Acceptance of Anti-Obesity Threat Appeals to Children? When the Going Gets Tough, the Audience Gets Going. Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):243-257.
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  35. Brian Epstein (2015). How Many Kinds of Glue Hold the Social World Together? In Mattia Gallotti & John Michael (eds.), Social Ontology and Social Cognition.
    In recent years, theorists have debated how we introduce new social objects and kinds into the world. Searle, for instance, proposes that they are introduced by collective acceptance of a constitutive rule; Millikan and Elder that they are the products of reproduction processes; Thomasson that they result from creator intentions and subsequent intentional reproduction; and so on. In this chapter, I argue against the idea that there is a single generic method or set of requirements for doing so. (...)
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  36. Titus Stahl (2011). Institutional Power, Collective Acceptance, and Recognition. In Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill 349--372.
    The article defines the boundaries of social and institutional power clearly; it argues that all institutional power rests finally on the acceptance of sanctioning authority and thus on mutual recognition.
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  37.  10
    Raul Hakli (2011). On Dialectical Justification of Group Beliefs‖. In Hans Bernhard Schmid, Daniel Sirtes & Marcel Weber (eds.), Collective Epistemology. Ontos 119--153.
    Epistemic justification of non-summative group beliefs is studied in this paper. Such group beliefs are understood to be voluntary acceptances, the justification of which differs from that of involuntary beliefs. It is argued that whereas epistemic evaluation of involuntary beliefs can be seen not to require reasons, justification of voluntary acceptance of a proposition as true requires that the agent, a group or an individual, can provide reasons for the accepted view. This basic idea is studied in relation to (...)
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  38.  55
    Pierre Steiner & John Stewart (2009). From Autonomy to Heteronomy (and Back): The Enaction of Social Life. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):527-550.
    The term “social cognition” can be construed in different ways. On the one hand, it can refer to the cognitive faculties involved in social activities, defined simply as situations where two or more individuals interact. On this view, social systems would consist of interactions between autonomous individuals; these interactions form higher-level autonomous domains not reducible to individual actions. A contrasting, alternative view is based on a much stronger theoretical definition of a truly social domain, which is (...)
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  39.  31
    Alan Willis (2003). The Role of the Global Reporting Initiative's Sustainability Reporting Guidelines in the Social Screening of Investments. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):233 - 237.
    Social screening of investments calls not only for investment policy and criteria, but also for information about companies, their policies, practices and performance. The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and its June 2000 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines have the potential to significantly improve the usefulness and quality of information reported by companies about their environmental, social and economic impacts and performance. The GRI aims to develop a voluntary reporting framework that will elevate sustainability reporting practices to a level equivalent to (...)
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  40.  7
    Ingar Brinck (2015). Understanding Social Norms and Constitutive Rules: Perspectives From Developmental Psychology and Philosophy. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):699-718.
    An experimental paradigm that purports to test young children’s understanding of social norms is examined. The paradigm models norms on Searle’s notion of a constitutive rule. The experiments and the reasons provided for their design are discussed. It is argued that the experiments do not provide direct evidence about the development of social norms and that the concepts of a social norm and constitutive rule are distinct. The experimental data are re-interpreted, and suggestions for how to deal (...)
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  41.  7
    Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2003). The Impact of Self-Esteem, Machiavellianism, and Social Capital on Attorneys' Traditional Gender Outlook. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):323 - 335.
    Utilizing a national sample of 106 attorneys and hierarchical regression analysis, this study identified several individual tendencies that could adversely affect women attorneys' career experiences. The findings indicated that self-esteem was negatively associated with a traditional gender outlook, and that Machiavellianism was positively associated with conservative beliefs about gender. Tolerance for diversity was negatively related to a traditional gender outlook, while work-based social agency was positively related to the preference for established gender roles. The results imply that confidence brings (...)
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  42.  31
    Mette Ebbesen (2008). The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development. NanoEthics 2 (3):333-333.
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence (...)
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  43.  6
    Ilse Oosterlaken (2015). Applying Value Sensitive Design to Wind Turbines and Wind Parks: An Exploration. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):359-379.
    Community acceptance still remains a challenge for wind energy projects. The most popular explanation for local opposition, the Not in My Backyard effect, has received fierce criticism in the past decade. Critics argue that opposition is not merely a matter of selfishness or ignorance, but that moral, ecological and aesthetic values play an important role. In order to better take such values into account, a more bottom-up, participatory decision process is usually proposed. Research on this topic focusses on either (...)
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  44.  17
    Donald M. Bruce (2002). A Social Contract for Biotechnology: Shared Visions for Risky Technologies? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):279-289.
    Future technological developmentsconcerning food, agriculture, and theenvironment face a gulf of social legitimationfrom a skeptical public and media, in the wakeof the crises of BSE, GM food, and foot andmouth disease in the UK (House of Lords, 2000). Keyethical issues were ignored by the bioindustry,regulators, and the Government, leaving alegacy of distrust. The paper examinesagricultural biotechnology in terms of a socialcontract, whose conditions would have to be fulfilled togain acceptance of novel applications. Variouscurrent and future GM applications areevaluated (...)
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  45. Eugene Halton (1995). Bereft of Reason: On the Decline of Social Thought and Prospects for its Renewal. University of Chicago Press.
    In this radical critique of contemporary social theory, Eugene Halton argues that both modernism and postmodernism are damaged philosophies whose acceptance of the myths of the mind/body dichotomy make them incapable of solving our social dilemmas. Claiming that human beings should be understood as far more than simply a form of knowledge, social construction, or contingent difference, Halton argues that contemporary thought has lost touch with the spontaneous passions—or enchantment—of life. Exploring neglected works in twentieth century (...)
     
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  46.  7
    Paulina Vidal Pollarolo (2002). La identidad estigmatizada. Polis 3.
    El artículo analiza la identidad de la mujer que ejerce la prostitución, a través de historias de vida que exploran los motivos que la llevaron a ello, los modos de inserción, las vivencias relacionadas con el estigma de ser prostituta, como persona indigna de aceptación social, y la auto-imagen que poseen de sí.
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  47.  3
    Joel Best (1994). Innumeracy in Social Problems Construction: Missing Children, Vanishing Workers, and Other Statistical Claims. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (4):367-376.
    Statistical claims are often central to the contemporary construction of social problems. The failure to subject these figures to critical analysis is a form of innumeracy, the inability to deal effectively with mathematical concepts. Two cases from the United States -estimates of the number of missing children, and projections for the workforce in the year 2000 -illustrate how the uncritical acceptance of inaccurate statistics can shape policy debates. Claimsmakers, the mass media, and the media audience all contribute to (...)
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  48.  16
    Jeff Mitchell (2000). Living a Lie: Self-Deception, Habit, and Social Roles. [REVIEW] Human Studies 23 (2):145-156.
    In this paper I give an account of self-deception by situating it within the theory of human conduct advanced by American pragmatists John Dewey and George Herbert Mead. After examining and rejecting the two most prevalent explanations of self-deception - namely, Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic interpretation and Jean-Paul Sartre's phenomenological one - I provide a brief sketch of some of Dewey's and Mead's fundamental insights into the inherently social nature of mind.I argue that one of the main forms of self-deception (...)
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  49.  5
    Jorge Arturo Chaves (2002). Economic Democracy, Social Dialogue, and Ethical Analysis: Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1/2):153 - 159.
    The purpose of this article is to present in a summarized form a new approach to the ethical analysis of economic policies and to illustrate its importance with a reference to recent experiences of social dialogue in Costa Rica. A general view of the Latin American scenario is presented, with the belief that some of the main problems there observed call for a type of analysis like the one here proposed. In the second place, a brief characterization of this (...)
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  50.  4
    Evan Simpson & Mark Williams (1994). The Ideal of Social Disillusionment. Philosophical Forum 26 (1):63-77.
    In this paper we argue that individuals in modern societies can share a general appreciation of the contingency of moral and political engagement without endangering these purposeful attachments. Depending upon the acceptance of various cognitive conventions, social practices and institutions cannot be sustained by appeals to advantage alone, but these conventions do not demand ontological commitment. Transparent fictions rather than ideological illusions can suffice to sustain valued forms of life. In contrast to Rorty's ironic society in which "only (...)
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