Search results for 'Social action' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  34
    Seumas Miller (2001). Social Action: A Teleological Account. Cambridge University Press.
    Social action is central to social thought. This centrality reflects the overwhelming causal significance of action for social life, the centrality of action to any account of social phenomena, and the fact that conventions and normativity are features of human activity. This book provides philosophical analyses of fundamental categories of human social action, including cooperative action, conventional action, social norm governed action, and the actions of the occupants (...)
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  2.  25
    Corinne Gendron, Véronique Bisaillon & Ana Isabel Otero Rance (2009). The Institutionalization of Fair Trade: More Than Just a Degraded Form of Social Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):63 - 79.
    The context of economic globalization has contributed to the emergence of a new form of social action which has spread into the economic sphere in the form of the new social economic movements. The emblematic figure of this new generation of social movements is fair trade, which influences the economy towards political or social ends. Having emerged from multiple alternative trade practices, fair trade has gradually become institutionalized since the professionalization of World Shops, the arrival (...)
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  3.  5
    Sergey Zenkin (2012). Social Action and its Sense: Historical Hermeneutics After Ricoeur. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 3 (1):86-101.
    In the 1970s, particularly in his article “The Model of the Text: Meaningful Action Considered as a Text” (1971), Paul Ricœur proposed a hypothesis concerning the homology between the text and social action. That hypothesis is not reducible to the narrative logic prevailing in late Ricœur’s writings, and we are searching to elucidate its further implications in social sciences. A new hermeneutics of social meanings can be founded upon it, enriched by the methodological experience of (...)
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  4.  17
    Preston T. King (ed.) (2003). Trusting in Reason: Martin Hollis and the Philosophy of Social Action. Frank Cass.
    Martin Hollis (d.1998) was arguably the most incisive, eloquent and witty philosopher of the social sciences of his time. His work is appreciated and contested here by some of the most eminent of contemporary social theorists. Hollis's philosophy of social action, routinely distinguished between understanding (rational) and explanation (causal). He argued that the aptest account of human interaction was to be made in terms of the first. Thus he focused upon the human reasons, for, rather than (...)
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  5.  27
    Martin Hollis (1977). Models of Man: Philosophical Thoughts on Social Action. Cambridge University Press.
    All social theorists and philosophers who seek to explain human action have a 'model of man', a metaphysical view of human nature. Some make man a plastic creature of nature and nurture, some present him as the autonomous creator of his social world, some offer a compromise. Each view needs its own theory of scientific knowledge calling for philosophic appraisal and the compromise sets harder puzzles than either. Passive accounts of man, for example, have a robust notion (...)
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  6.  23
    Axel Honneth (1988). Social Action and Human Nature. Cambridge University Press.
    INTRODUCTION 'Anthropology' does not have quite the same meaning in Germany as it has in English-speaking countries. As the word is used in the latter ...
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  7. Lewis Samuel Feuer, Sidney Hook, William L. O'neill & Roger O'Toole (1988). Philosophy, History and Social Action Essays in Honor of Lewis Feuer : With an Autobiographical Essay by Lewis Feuer. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  8. Gottfried Seebass & Raimo Tuomela (1985). Social Action.
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  9.  43
    Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.) (2003). Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Realism in Action is a selection of essays written by leading representatives in the fields of action theory and philosophy of mind, philosophy of the social sciences and especially the nature of social action, and of epistemology and philosophy of science. Practical reason, reasons and causes in action theory, intending and trying, and folk-psychological explanation are some of the topics discussed by these leading participants. A particular emphasis is laid on trust, commitments and (...) institutions, on the possibility of grounding social notions in individual social attitudes, on the nature of social groups, institutions and collective intentionality, and on common belief and common knowledge. Applications to the social sciences include, e.g., a look at the Erklären-Verstehen controversy in economics, and at constructivist and realist views on archeological reconstructions of the past. (shrink)
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  10.  17
    Matteo Bianchin (2015). From Joint Attention to Communicative Action Some Remarks on Critical Theory, Social Ontology and Cognitive Science. Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (6):593-608.
    In this article I consider the relevance of Tomasello’s work on social cognition to the theory of communicative action. I argue that some revisions are needed to cope with Tomasello’s results, but they do not affect the core of the theory. Moreover, they arguably reinforce both its explanatory power and the plausibility of its normative claims. I proceed in three steps. First, I compare and contrast Tomasello’s views on the ontogeny of human social cognition with the main (...)
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  11.  57
    N. Gangopadhyay & L. Schilbach (2011). Seeing Minds: A Neurophilosophical Investigation of the Role of Perception-Action Coupling in Social Perception. Social Neuroscience.
    This paper proposes an empirical hypothesis that in some cases of social interaction we have an immediate perceptual access to others' minds in the perception of their embodied intentionality. Our point of departure is the phenomenological insight that there is an experiential difference in the perception of embodied intentionality and the perception of non-intentionality. The other's embodied intentionality is perceptually given in a way that is different from the givenness of non-intentionality. We claim that the phenomenological difference in the (...)
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  12.  80
    Joshua Shepherd (2012). Action, Mindreading and Embodied Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):507-518.
    One of the central insights of the embodied cognition (EC) movement is that cognition is closely tied to action. In this paper, I formulate an EC-inspired hypothesis concerning social cognition. In this domain, most think that our capacity to understand and interact with one another is best explained by appeal to some form of mindreading. I argue that prominent accounts of mindreading likely contain a significant lacuna. Evidence indicates that what I call an agent’s actional processes and states—her (...)
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  13.  42
    Marion Godman (2013). Why We Do Things Together: The Social Motivation for Joint Action. Philosophical Psychology 26 (4):588-603.
    Joint action is a growing field of research, spanning across the cognitive, behavioral, and brain sciences as well as receiving considerable attention amongst philosophers. I argue that there has been a significant oversight within this field concerning the possibility that many joint actions are driven, at least in part, by agents' social motivations rather than merely by their shared intentions. Social motivations are not directly related to the (joint) target goal of the action. Instead, when agents (...)
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  14.  7
    Satinder P. Gill & Jan Borchers (2004). Knowledge in Co-Action: Social Intelligence in Collaborative Design Activity. [REVIEW] AI and Society 18 (1):86-86.
    Skilled cooperative action means being able to understand the communicative situation and know how and when to respond appropriately for the purpose at hand. This skill is of the performance of knowledge in co-action and is a form of social intelligence for sustainable interaction. Social intelligence, here, denotes the ability of actors and agents to manage their relationships with each other. Within an environment we have people, tools, artefacts and technologies that we engage with. Let us (...)
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  15.  1
    Martian Iovan (2010). Reflections on Christian Democratic Doctrine and Social Action. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (23):159-165.
    Radu Carp, Dacian Gratian Gal, Sorin Muresan, Radu Preda, Principles of Popular Thought. Christian Democratic Doctrine and Social Action, Eikon: Cluj, 2006.
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  16.  7
    Bennett W. Helm (2002). Action for the Sake of ...: Caring and the Rationality of (Social) Action. Analyse & Kritik 24 (2):189--208.
    My aim is to understand at least some of the non-instrumental reasons we can have for action in a way that can provide a satisfying non-egoist account of 'social actions' - actions undertaken for the sake of others. I do this in part by presenting, in terms of a discussion of the rationality of emotions, an account of what it is for something to have import to an agent . I then extend this account to include our caring (...)
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  17.  1
    Antonella Carassa & Marco Colombetti (2015). Interpersonal Communication as Social Action. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 45 (4-5):407-423.
    We compare a number of influential approaches to human communication with the aim of understanding what it means for interpersonal communication to be a form of social action. In particular, we discuss the large-scale social normativity advocated by speech act theory, the view of communication as small-scale social interaction proper of Gricean approaches, and the intimate connection between communication and cooperation defended by Tomasello. We then argue in favor of a small-scale view of communication capable of (...)
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  18.  4
    Miguel A. Cabrera (2001). On Language, Culture, and Social Action. History and Theory 40 (4):82–100.
    This article outlines the theoretical developments experienced in historical studies over the last two decades. As a consequence of the growing critical reconsideration of some of the main theoretical assumptions underlying historical explanation of individuals' meaningful actions, a new theory of society has taken shape among historians during this time. By emphasizing the empirical and analytical distinction between language as a pattern of meanings and language as a means of communication, a significant group of historians has thoroughly recast the conventional (...)
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  19.  7
    Neil Betten (1971). John Ryan and the Social Action Department. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):227-246.
    John Ryan, American Progressive, was the paramount figure in the Social Action Department and its role in great part reflected his own intellectual development.
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  20.  7
    Aimee Dars Ellis (2011). Engaging in Social Action at Work. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:253-264.
    Many organizations are utilizing corporate social responsibility initiatives that require employee participation. These initiatives, which involve social action at work (SAW), can be a source of reputational gains, benefit the community, and increase employee organizational identification (Ellis, 2009). Although research has been conducted on employee volunteer programs (EVP), one aspect of SAW, those studies have not identified the characteristics of employees who are most likely to participate in EVP nor have they considered the wide range of SAW (...)
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  21.  3
    Raimo Tuomela & Kaarlo Miller (1985). We-Intentions and Social Action. Analyse & Kritik 7 (1):26-43.
    In the paper "We-intentions and Social Action" conceptual issues related to intentional social action are studied. By social actions we here mean actions that are performed together by two or more agents. The central concept of we-intention is introduced and applied to the analysis of simple social practical reasoning. An individualistic analysis of the notion of we-intention is proposed on the basis of the agents, I-intentions and beliefs. The need and indespensability of we-intentions and (...)
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  22.  14
    John R. Hall (1984). The Problem of Epistemology in the Social Action Perspective. Sociological Theory 2:253-289.
    Parsons's epistemology of "analytical realism" could be developed only by first displacing Weber's alternative epistemology within the social action perspective. Reconsideration of Parsons's epistemological moves shows that he came to conclusions unsupportable within the social action perspective. Reassertion of the postulate of Verstehen retrieves his achievements from the pure functionalism and positivism he opposed, by establishing a comprehensive action scheme centered on ideal-type analysis.
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  23.  8
    Nathalie Bulle (2009). Under What Conditions Can Formal Models of Social Action Claim Explanatory Power? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (1):47-64.
    This paper's purpose is to set forth the conditions of explanation in the domain of formal modelling of social action. Explanation is defined as an adequate account of the underlying factors bringing about a phenomenon. The modelling of a social phenomenon can claim explanatory value in this sense if the following two conditions are fulfilled. (1) The generative mechanisms involved translate the effects of real factors abstracted from their phenomenal context, not those of purely ideal ones. (2) (...)
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  24. Marvin Belzer (1986). Intentional Social Action and We-Intentions. Analyse & Kritik 8 (1):86-108.
    In his recent book Professor Tuomela presents a philosophical account of social action that relies upon the presuppositions of his purposive-causal theory of individual action. In particular, the concept of "we-intention" plays as central a role in the new theory as does that of intention in the earlier one. This article examines Tuomela's concept of "we-intention". Tuomela's introduction of the concept into social action theory is motivated by the assumption that theories of individual actions and (...)
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  25.  0
    John Dewey & John J. McDermott (2008). The Later Works of John Dewey, Volume 11, 1925 - 1953: Essays, Reviews, Trotsky Inquiry, Miscellany, and Liberalism and Social Action. [REVIEW] Southern Illinois University Press.
    This volume includes ninety-two items from 1935, 1936, and 1937, including Dewey's 1935 Page-Barbour Lectures at the University of Virginia, published as Liberalism and Social Action.
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  26. Ryan Goodman, Derek Jinks & Andrew K. Woods (eds.) (2012). Understanding Social Action, Promoting Human Rights. OUP Usa.
    In Understanding Social Action, Promoting Human Rights, editors Ryan Goodman, Derek Jinks, and Andrew K. Woods bring together a stellar group of contributors from across the social sciences to apply a broad yet conceptually unified array of advanced social science research concepts to the study of human rights and human rights law.
     
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  27. Anton Leist (1985). Eine Individualistische Theorie Sozialen Handelns. Zu Raimo Tuomelas "A Theory of Social Action. Analyse & Kritik 7 (2):180-205.
    This critical review concentrates on four important parts of Raimo Tuomela's analytical theory of social action. It examines the book's reconstructions of social action, of practical reasoning in this context, of social norms and it investigates its claim to a conceptual individualism. The result is critical in several aspects. Tuomela's most original idea in the analysis of joint action, that of we-intentions, is not broad enough to cover more than a part of social (...)
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  28. Raimo Tuomela (1986). Replies to the Critics of A Theory of Social Action. Analyse & Kritik 8 (2):229-241.
    The paper is a reply to the critical reviews of the author's "A Theory of Social Action" by Anton Leist, Marvin Belzer, and Julian Nida-Rümelin in this journal. As to Leist's main criticisms, which concern the notions of social action, social practical reasoning, individualism, and social norms, they are argued to be incorrect and unjustified. Belzer's criticisms are on the whole well taken, and in fact all of them have been noted by the author (...)
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  29.  12
    Cristiano Castelfranchi (2000). Through the Agents' Minds: Cognitive Mediators of Social Action. Mind and Society 1 (1):109-140.
    Thesis: Macro-level social phenomena are implemented through the (social) actions and minds of the individuals. Without an explicit theory of the agents' minds that founds, agents' behavior we cannot understand macro-level social phenomena, and in particular how they work. AntiThesis: Mind is not enough: the theory of individual (social) mind and action is not enough to explain several macro-level social phenomena. First, there are pre-cognitive, objective social structures that constrain the actions of the (...)
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  30.  8
    Kerry L. Marsh, Michael J. Richardson & R. C. Schmidt (2009). Social Connection Through Joint Action and Interpersonal Coordination. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):320-339.
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  31.  13
    Tim Henning (2014). Alienation—New Perspectives From Environmental Ethics, Social Philosophy, and Action Theory; an Introduction. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):7-11.
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  32.  4
    James E. Mattingly & Shawn L. Berman (2006). Measurement of Corporate Social Action Discovering Taxonomy in the Kinder Lydenburg Domini Ratings Data. Business and Society 45 (1):20-46.
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  33. Rosaria Conte & Cristiano Castelfranchi (1995). Cognitive and Social Action.
  34.  19
    Virginia Held (1984/1989). Rights and Goods: Justifying Social Action. University of Chicago Press.
    Theories of justice, argues Virginia Held, are usually designed for a perfect, hypothetical world. They do not give us guidelines for living in an imperfect world in which the choices and decisions that we must make are seldom clear-cut. Seeking a morality based on actual experience, Held offers a method of inquiry with which to deal with the specific moral problems encountered in daily life. She argues that the division between public and private morality is misleading and shows convincingly that (...)
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  35.  19
    Varol Akman, Contexts of Social Action: Guest Editors' Introduction.
    In traditional linguistic accounts of context, one thinks of the immediate features of a speech situation, that is, a situation in which an expression is uttered. Thus, features such as time, location, speaker, hearer and preceding discourse are all parts of context. But context is a wider and more transcendental notion than what these accounts imply. For one thing, context is a relational concept relating social actions and their surroundings, relating social actions, relating individual actors and their surroundings, (...)
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  36. Alfred Schutz (forthcoming). The Social World and the Theory of Social Action. Social Research.
     
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  37. Stephen Bodington (1978). Science and Social Action. Allison and Busby.
     
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  38. Richard Grathoff (1970). The Structure of Social Inconsistencies a Contribution to a Unified Theory of Play, Game, and Social Action. Martinus Nijhoff.
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  39.  34
    Martin Hollis (1996). Reason in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Did Adam and Eve act rationally in eating the fruit of the forbidden tree? That can seem to depend solely on whether they had found the best means to their ends, in the spirit of the 'economic' theories of rationality. Martin Hollis respects the elegance and power of these theories but judges their paradoxes endemic. He argues that social action cannot be understood by viewing human beings as abstract individuals with preferences in search of satisfaction, nor by divorcing (...)
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  40. Elizabeth Suzanne Kassab (1991). The Theory of Social Action in the Schutz-Parsons Debate Social Action, Social Personality and Social Reality in the Early Works of Schutz and Parsons : A Critical Study of the Schutz-Parsons Correspondence. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  41.  13
    Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, Cees Leeuwis, Ken E. Giller & Thom W. Kuyper (2008). Action Research on Alternative Land Tenure Arrangements in Wenchi, Ghana: Learning From Ambiguous Social Dynamics and Self-Organized Institutional Innovation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):389-403.
    This study reports on action research efforts that were aimed at developing institutional arrangements beneficial for soil fertility improvement. Three stages of action research are described and analyzed. We initially began by bringing stakeholders together in a platform to engage in a collaborative design of new arrangements. However, this effort was stymied mainly because conditions conducive for learning and negotiation were lacking. We then proceeded to support experimentation with alternative arrangements initiated by individual landowners and migrant farmers. The (...)
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  42.  13
    Steve Smith (2001). Many (Dirty) Hands Make Light Work: Martin Hollis's Account of Social Action. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):123-148.
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  43.  3
    Safi Shams (2015). Book Review: The Explanation of Social Action by John Levi Martin. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 45 (3):394-399.
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  44.  24
    Susan Hekman (1984). Action as a Text: Gadamer's Hermeneutics and the Social Scientific Analysis of Action. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 14 (3):333–354.
    This paper argues that Gadamer's hermeneutics offers a methodological perspective for social and political theory that overcomes the impasse created by the dichotomy between the positivist and humanist approaches to social action. Both the positivists’attempt to replace the actors’subjective concepts with the objective concepts of the social scientist and the humanists’attempt to describe meaningful action strictly in the social actors’terms have been called into question in contemporary discussions. Gadamer's approach, which is based on the (...)
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  45.  31
    Maksymilian Del Mar (2011). Concerted Practices and the Presence of Obligations: Joint Action in Competition Law and Social Philosophy. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 30 (1):105-140.
    This paper considers whether, and if so how, the modelling of joint action in social philosophy – principally in the work of Margaret Gilbert and Michael Bratman – might assist in understanding and applying the concept of concerted practices in European competition law. More specifically, the paper focuses on a well-known difficulty in the application of that concept, namely, distinguishing between concerted practice and rational or intelligent adaptation in oligopolistic markets. The paper argues that although Bratman’s model of (...)
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  46.  5
    Hans Chr Garmann Johnsen (2005). Action Research and Knowledge Co-Generation: A Not so Dangerous Liaison with Conventional Social Research. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):543-551.
    The article reflects on experience of action research in the context of regional development, where there has been pressure to produce practical results. The epistemological status of Action Research is explored, in contrast to conventional social science research. The article concludes that an ongoing relationship with conventional social research is necessary.
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  47.  1
    Maksymilian Del Mar (2011). Concerted Practices and the Presence of Obligations: Joint Action in Competition Law and Social Philosophy. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 30 (1):105 - 140.
    This paper considers whether, and if so how, the modelling of joint action in social philosophy – principally in the work of Margaret Gilbert and Michael Bratman – might assist in understanding and applying the concept of concerted practices in European competition law. More specifically, the paper focuses on a well-known difficulty in the application of that concept, namely, distinguishing between concerted practice and rational or intelligent adaptation in oligopolistic markets. The paper argues that although Bratman's model of (...)
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  48.  3
    I. Liebenberg & P. de Kock (2010). Review Article: Transforming the State Away From the State? Radical Social Action and 'Minority Attractions' Under Scrutiny. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (2).
    This review article situates the work Black Flame within a capita selecta of earlier publications on anarchism-syndicalism and radical thought. Schmidt and Van der Walt's contribution (2009) is a recent addition to political thought, theory and socio-economic practice within the broad stream of anarcho-syndicalism. Its treatment of anarchism and anarchist syndicalist groups in the workplace within an international context since the middle 1800s and the attempt to situate the debate in contemporary society are some notable features. The authors engage with (...)
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  49.  11
    James Evans, Ian Cook & Helen Griffiths (2008). Creativity, Group Pedagogy and Social Action: A Departure From Gough. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (2):330–345.
    The following paper continues discussions within this journal about how the work of Delueze and Guattari can inform radical pedagogy. Building primarily on Noel Gough's 2004 paper, we take up the challenge to move towards a more creative form of 'becoming cyborg' in our teaching. In contrast to work that has focused on Deleuzian theories of the rhizome, we deploy Guattari's work on institutional schizoanalysis to explore the role of group creativity in radical pedagogy. The institutional therapies of Felix Guattari's (...)
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  50.  1
    Shira Eve Epstein (2013). Independent Voices, Social Insight, and Action: An Analysis of a Social Action Project. Journal of Social Studies Research 37 (3):123-136.
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