Search results for 'Social cognition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bertram F. Malle (2005). Folk Theory of Mind: Conceptual Foundations of Human Social Cognition. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 225-255.score: 108.0
    The human ability to represent, conceptualize, and reason about mind and behavior is one of the greatest achievements of human evolution and is made possible by a “folk theory of mind” — a sophisticated conceptual framework that relates different mental states to each other and connects them to behavior. This chapter examines the nature and elements of this framework and its central functions for social cognition. As a conceptual framework, the folk theory of mind operates prior to any (...)
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  2. Leon De Bruin & Sanneke De Haan (2012). Enactivism and Social Cognition: In Search for the Whole Story. Journal of Cognitive Semiotics (1):225-250.score: 98.0
    Although the enactive approach has been very successful in explaining many basic social interactions in terms of embodied practices, there is still much work to be done when it comes to higher forms of social cognition. In this article, we discuss and evaluate two recent proposals by Shaun Gallagher and Daniel Hutto that try to bridge this ‘cognitive gap’ by appealing to the notion of narrative practice. Although we are enthusiastic about these proposals, we argue that (i) (...)
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  3. Joshua Shepherd (2012). Action, Mindreading and Embodied Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):507-518.score: 98.0
    One of the central insights of the embodied cognition (EC) movement is that cognition is closely tied to action. In this paper, I formulate an EC-inspired hypothesis concerning social cognition. In this domain, most think that our capacity to understand and interact with one another is best explained by appeal to some form of mindreading. I argue that prominent accounts of mindreading likely contain a significant lacuna. Evidence indicates that what I call an agent’s actional processes (...)
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  4. Shannon Spaulding (2012). Introduction to Debates on Embodied Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):431-448.score: 98.0
    Embodied social cognition (ESC) aims to explicate how our embodiment shapes our knowledge of others, and in what this knowledge of others consists. Although there is much diversity amongst ESC accounts, common to all these accounts is the idea that our normal everyday interactions consist in non-mentalistic embodied engagements. In recent years, several theorists have developed and defended innovative and controversial accounts of ESC. These accounts challenge, and offer deflationary alternatives to, the standard cognitivist accounts of social (...)
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  5. Mitchell Herschbach (2012). On the Role of Social Interaction in Social Cognition: A Mechanistic Alternative to Enactivism. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):467-486.score: 98.0
    Researchers in the enactivist tradition have recently argued that social interaction can constitute social cognition, rather than simply serve as the context for social cognition. They contend that a focus on social interaction corrects the overemphasis on mechanisms inside the individual in the explanation of social cognition. I critically assess enactivism’s claims about the explanatory role of social interaction in social cognition. After sketching the enactivist approach to cognition (...)
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  6. Christian Onof & Leslie Marsh (2008). Introduction to the Special Issue “Perspectives on Social Cognition”. Cognitive Systems Research 9 (1-2).score: 98.0
    No longer is sociality the preserve of the social sciences, or ‘‘culture’’ the preserve of the humanities or anthropology. By the same token, cognition is no longer the sole preserve of the cognitive sciences. Social cognition (SC) or, sociocognition if you like, is thus a kaleidoscope of research projects that has seen exponential growth over the past 30 or so years.
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  7. Tadeusz Wieslaw Zawidzki (2012). Unlikely Allies: Embodied Social Cognition and the Intentional Stance. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):487-506.score: 98.0
    I argue that proponents of embodied social cognition (ESC) can usefully supplement their views if they enlist the help of an unlikely ally: Daniel Dennett. On Dennett’s view, human social cognition involves adopting the intentional stance (IS), i.e., assuming that an interpretive target’s behavior is an optimally rational attempt to fulfill some desire relative to her beliefs. Characterized this way, proponents of ESC would reject any alliance with Dennett. However, for Dennett, to attribute mental states from (...)
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  8. Beata Stawarska (2006). Mutual Gaze and Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):17-30.score: 98.0
    I examine the role of mutual gaze in social cognition. I start by discussing recent studies of joint visual attention in order to show that social cognition is operative in infancy prior to the emergence of theoretical skills required to make judgments about other people's states of mind. Such social cognition depends on the communicative potential inherent in human bodies. I proceed to examine this embodied social cognition in the context of Merleau-Ponty's (...)
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  9. Hanne de Jaegher, Ezequiel di Paolo & Shaun Gallagher (2010). Can Social Interaction Constitute Social Cognition? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):441-447.score: 98.0
    An important shift is taking place in social cognition research, away from a focus on the individual mind and toward embodied and participatory aspects of social understanding. Empirical results already imply that social cognition is not reducible to the workings of individual cognitive mechanisms. To galvanize this interactive turn, we provide an operational definition of social interaction and distinguish the different explanatory roles – contextual, enabling and constitutive – it can play in social (...)
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  10. Shannon Spaulding (2013). Mirror Neurons and Social Cognition. Mind and Language 28 (2):233-257.score: 96.0
    Mirror neurons are widely regarded as an important key to social cognition. Despite such wide agreement, there is very little consensus on how or why they are important. The goal of this paper is to clearly explicate the exact role mirror neurons play in social cognition. I aim to answer two questions about the relationship between mirroring and social cognition: What kind of social understanding is involved with mirroring? How is mirroring related to (...)
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  11. Shannon Spaulding (2011). Embodied Social Cognition. Philosophical Topics 39 (1):141-162.score: 96.0
    In this paper I evaluate embodied social cognition, embodied cognition’s account of how we understand others. I identify and evaluate three claims that motivate embodied social cognition. These claims are not specific to social cognition; they are general hypotheses about cognition. As such, they may be used in more general arguments for embodied cognition. I argue that we have good reasons to reject these claims. Thus, the case for embodied social (...)
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  12. Joel Krueger & John Michael (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (81):1-14.score: 96.0
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological, and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. We distinguish two ways of conceptualizing the role of such coupling processes in social cognition: strong and moderate interactionism. According to strong interactionism (SI), low-level coupling processes are alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. Moderate interactionism(MI) on the other hand, is an integrative approach. Its (...)
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  13. L. Woolfolk Robert, M. Doris John & M. Darley John (2007). Identification, Situational Constraint, and Social Cognition : Studies in the Attribution of Moral Responsibility. In Joshua Knobe & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    In three experiments we studied lay observers’ attributions of responsibility for an antisocial act (homicide). We systematically varied both the degree to which the action was coerced by external circumstances and the degree to which the actor endorsed and accepted ownership of the act, a psychological state that philosophers have termed ‘identification’. Our findings with respect to identification were highly consistent. The more an actor was identified with an action, the more likely observers were to assign responsibility to the actor, (...)
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  14. Jane Suilin Lavelle (2012). Two Challenges to Hutto's Enactive Account of Pre-Linguistic Social Cognition. Philosophia 40 (3):459-472.score: 96.0
    Daniel Hutto’s Enactive account of social cognition maintains that pre- and non-linguistic interactions do not require that the participants represent the psychological states of the other. This goes against traditional ‘cognitivist’ accounts of these social phenomena. This essay examines Hutto’s Enactive account, and proposes two challenges. The account maintains that organisms respond to the behaviours of others, and in doing so respond to the ‘intentional attitude’ which the other has. The first challenge argues that there is no (...)
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  15. Marco Fenici (2012). Embodied Social Cognition and Embedded Theory of Mind. Biolinguistics 6 (3--47):276--307.score: 96.0
    Embodiment and embeddedness define an attractive framework to the study of cognition. I discuss whether theory of mind, i.e. the ability to attribute mental states to others to predict and explain their behaviour, fits these two principles. In agreement with available evidence, embodied cognitive processes may underlie the earliest manifestations of social cognitive abilities such as infants’ selective behaviour in spontaneous-response false belief tasks. Instead, late theory-of-mind abilities, such as the capacity to pass the (elicited-response) false belief test (...)
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  16. Nicki Marquardt & Rainer Hoeger (2009). The Effect of Implicit Moral Attitudes on Managerial Decision-Making: An Implicit Social Cognition Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):157 - 171.score: 96.0
    This article concerns itself with the relationship between implicit moral cognitions and decisions in the realm of business ethics. Traditionally, business ethics research emphasized the effects of overt or explicit attitudes on ethical decision-making and neglected intuitive or implicit attitudes. Therefore, based on an implicit social cognition approach it is important to know whether implicit moral attitudes may have a substantial impact on managerial ethical decision-making processes. To test this thesis, a study with 50 participants was conducted. In (...)
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  17. Vivian Bohl & Wouter van den Bos (2012). Toward an Integrative Account of Social Cognition: Marrying Theory of Mind and Interactionism to Study the Interplay of Type 1 and Type 2 Processes. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 96.0
    Traditional theory of mind (ToM) accounts for social cognition have been at the basis of most studies in the social cognitive neurosciences. However, in recent years, the need to go beyond traditional ToM accounts for understanding real life social interactions has become all the more pressing. At the same time it remains unclear whether alternative accounts, such as interactionism, can yield a sufficient description and explanation of social interactions. We argue that instead of considering ToM (...)
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  18. Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2014). Introduction: Embodiment and Empathy, Current Debates in Social Cognition. Topoi 33 (1):117-127.score: 96.0
    This special issue targets two topics in social cognition that appear to increasingly structure the nature of interdisciplinary discourse but are themselves not very well understood. These are the notions of empathy and embodiment. Both have a history rooted in phenomenological philosophy and both have found extensive application in contemporary interdisciplinary theories of social cognition, at times to establish claims that are arguably contrary to the ones made by the phenomenologists credited with giving us these notions. (...)
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  19. Jennifer Jordan (2009). A Social Cognition Framework for Examining Moral Awareness in Managers and Academics. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):237 - 258.score: 96.0
    This investigation applies a social cognition framework to examine moral awareness in business situations. Using a vignette-based instrument, the investigation compares the recall, recognition, and ascription of importance to moral-versus strategy-related issues in business managers (n = 86) and academic professors (n = 61). Results demonstrate that managers recall strategy-related issues more than moral-related issues and recognize and ascribe importance to moral-related issues less than academics. It also finds an inverse relationship between socialization in the business context and (...)
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  20. Kurt Wurthmann (2013). A Social Cognitive Perspective on the Relationships Between Ethics Education, Moral Attentiveness, and PRESOR. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):131-153.score: 96.0
    This research examines the relationships between education in business ethics, Reynolds’s (J Appl Psychol 93:1027–1041, 2008) “moral attentiveness” construct, or the extent to which individuals chronically perceive and reflect on morality and moral elements in their experiences, and Singhapakdi et al.’s (J Bus Ethics 15:1131–1140, 1996) measure of perceptions of the role of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR). Education in business ethics was found to be positively associated with the two identified factors of moral attentiveness, “reflective” and “perceptual” moral (...)
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  21. Andrew Thatcher & Mary Matthews (2012). Comparing Software Piracy in South Africa and Zambia Using Social Cognitive Theory. African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):1.score: 96.0
    This study examines cross-national differences in relation to software piracy between a Zambian and a South Africa student sample on components of Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. The sample was selected based on the vastly different software piracy rates between Zambia (82%) and South Africa (35%) and the fact that software piracy rates are higher amongst student groups. The questionnaire was composed of previously developed scales measuring attitudes, social norms, intentions, incentives, deterrents, self-efficacy, and moral disengagement within the context (...)
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  22. Jack Reynolds (forthcoming). Direct Perception, Inter-Subjectivity, and Social Cognition: Why Phenomenology is a Necessary but Not Sufficient Condition. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Research.score: 96.0
    In this paper I argue that many of the core phenomenological insights, including the emphasis on direct perception, are a necessary but not sufficient condition for an adequate account of inter-subjectivity today. I take it that an adequate account of inter-subjectivity must involve substantial interaction with empirical studies, notwithstanding the putative methodological differences between phenomenological description and scientific explanation. As such, I will need to explicate what kind of phenomenology survives, and indeed, thrives, in a milieu that necessitates engagement with (...)
     
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  23. Bella L. Galperin, Rebecca J. Bennett & Karl Aquino (2011). Status Differentiation and the Protean Self: A Social-Cognitive Model of Unethical Behavior in Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):407 - 424.score: 96.0
    Based on social-cognitive theory, this article proposes a model that seeks to explain why high status organizational members engage in unethical behavior. We argue that status differentiation in organizations creates social isolation which initiates activation of high status group identity and a deactivation of moral identity. We further argue that high status group identity results in insensitivity to the needs of out-group members which, in turn, results in lessened motivation to selfregulate ethical decision making. As a result of (...)
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  24. Somogy Varga (2011). Pretence, Social Cognition and Self-Knowledge in Autism. Psychopathology 44 (1):45-52..score: 96.0
    This article suggests that an account of pretence based on the idea of shared intentionality can be of help in understanding autism. In autism, there seems to be a strong link between being able to engage in pretend play, understanding the minds of others and having adequate access to own mental states. Since one of the first behavioral manifestations of autism is the lack of pretend play, it therefore seems natural to investigate pretence in order to identify the nature of (...)
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  25. Karen Danna Lynch (2007). Modeling Role Enactment: Linking Role Theory and Social Cognition. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):379–399.score: 88.0
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  26. Eric Luis Uhlmann, David A. Pizarro & Paul Bloom (2008). Varieties of Social Cognition. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (3):293-322.score: 88.0
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  27. Davide Secchi (2009). The Cognitive Side of Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):565 - 581.score: 82.0
    Individuals sit on the board of directors and set organizational goals, individuals make the product, push new marketing campaigns, make tough decisions, create new products, and so on. What is the role of social responsibility (SR) in their thinking? Do individuals need to behave responsibly to live in a social environment? Could this be grounded in their cognition? Furthermore, is there room for SR in our cognitive processes? And then, how can this analysis help studies on socially (...)
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  28. Marek Pokropski (forthcoming). Timing Together, Acting Together. Phenomenology of Intersubjective Temporality and Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-13.score: 82.0
    In this article I consider how the problem of social (intersubjective) cognition relates to time-consciousness. In the first part, I briefly introduce Husserl’s account of intersubjective cognition. I discuss the concept of empathy (Einfühlung) and its relation with time-consciousness. I argue that empathy is based on pre-reflective awareness of the other’s harmony of behaviour. In the second part, I distinguish pre-reflective (passive) and reflective (active) empathy and consider recent empirical research in the field of social (...). I argue that these levels of empathy are related with different levels of intersubjective temporality. By the intersubjective temporality I do not understand being in the same moment of objective time (so called clock time) but rather the shared experience of time and sharing temporal structure of actions. In the final part, I gather my considerations together and propose a general three-level framework of intersubjective temporality. (shrink)
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  29. Richard Heidler (2011). Cognitive and Social Structure of the Elite Collaboration Network of Astrophysics: A Case Study on Shifting Network Structures. [REVIEW] Minerva 49 (4):461-488.score: 80.0
    Scientific collaboration can only be understood along the epistemic and cognitive grounding of scientific disciplines. New scientific discoveries in astrophysics led to a major restructuring of the elite network of astrophysics. To study the interplay of the epistemic grounding and the social network structure of a discipline, a mixed-methods approach is necessary. It combines scientometrics, quantitative network analysis and visualization tools with a qualitative network analysis approach. The centre of the international collaboration network of astrophysics is demarcated by identifying (...)
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  30. David Huepe & Natalia Salas (2013). Fluid Intelligence, Social Cognition, and Perspective Changing Abilities as Pointers of Psychosocial Adaptation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 80.0
    Fluid intelligence, social cognition, and perspective changing abilities as pointers of psychosocial adaptation.
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  31. Bonita P. Klein-Tasman Faye van der Fluit, Michael S. Gaffrey (2012). Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Relations Between Performance on the Social Attribution Task and Cognitive and Behavioral Characteristics. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 80.0
    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder of genetic origin, with characteristic cognitive and personality profiles. Studies of WS point to an outgoing and gregarious personality style, often contrasted with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs); however, recent research has uncovered underlying social reciprocity difficulties in people with WS. Participants in the current study included 24 children with WS ages 8 through 15. A lab-based measure of social perception and social cognition was administered (Social Attribution Test), as (...)
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  32. Andreas Roepstorff Kristian Tylén, Micah Allen, Bjørk K. Hunter (2012). Interaction Vs. Observation: Distinctive Modes of Social Cognition in Human Brain and Behavior? A Combined fMRI and Eye-Tracking Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 80.0
    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social (...)
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  33. Anthony I. Jack Benjamin Kubit (2013). Rethinking the Role of the rTPJ in Attention and Social Cognition in Light of the Opposing Domains Hypothesis: Findings From an ALE-Based Meta-Analysis and Resting-State Functional Connectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 80.0
    The right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ) has been associated with two apparently disparate functional roles: in attention and in social cognition. According to one account, the rTPJ initiates a “circuit-breaking” signal that interrupts ongoing attentional processes, effectively reorienting attention. It is argued this primary function of the rTPJ has been extended beyond attention, through a process of evolutionarily cooption, to play a role in social cognition. We propose an alternative account, according to which the capacity for (...) cognition depends on a network which is both distinct from and in tension with brain areas involved in focused attention and target detection: the default mode network. Theory characterizing the rTPJ based on the area’s purported role in reorienting may be falsely guided by the co-occurrence of two distinct effects in contiguous regions: activation of the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), associated with its functional role in target detection; and the transient release, during spatial reorienting, of suppression of the angular gyrus (AG) associated with focused attention. Findings based on meta-analysis and resting functional connectivity are presented which support this alternative account. We find distinct regions, possessing anti-correlated patterns of resting connectivity, associated with social reasoning (AG) and target detection (SMG) at the rTPJ. The locus for reorienting was spatially intermediate between the AG and SMG and showed a pattern of connectivity with similarities to social reasoning and target detection seeds. These findings highlight a general methodological concern for brain imaging. Given evidence that certain tasks not only activate some areas but also suppress activity in other areas, it is suggested that researchers need to distinguish two distinct putative mechanisms, either of which may produce an increase in activity in a brain area: functional engagement in the task versus release of suppression. (shrink)
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  34. Erin E. Hecht, Richard Patterson & Aron K. Barbey (2012). What Can Other Animals Tell Us About Human Social Cognition? An Evolutionary Perspective on Reflective and Reflexive Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 80.0
    Human neuroscience has seen a recent boom in studies on reflective, controlled, explicit social cognitive functions like imitation, perspective‐taking, and empathy. The relationship of these higher‐level functions to lower‐level, reflexive, automatic, implicit functions is an area of current research. As the field continues to address this relationship, we suggest that an evolutionary, comparative approach will be useful, even essential. There is a large body of research on reflexive, automatic, implicit processes in animals. A growing perspective sees social cognitive (...)
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  35. R. Nathan Spreng (2013). Examining the Role of Memory in Social Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 80.0
    Examining the role of memory in social cognition.
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  36. Francis Sansbury Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Hannah Broadbent, Emily K. Farran, Elena Longhi, Dean D'Souza, Kay Metcalfe, May Tassabehji, Rachel Wu, Atsushi Senju, Francesca Happé, Peter Turnpenny (2012). Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Genotype/Phenotype Insights From Partial Deletion Patients. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 80.0
    Identifying genotype-phenotype relations in human social cognition has been enhanced by the study of Williams syndrome (WS). Indeed, individuals with WS present with a particularly strong social drive, and researchers have sought to link deleted genes in the WS Critical Region (WSCR) of chromosome 7q11.23 to this unusual social profile. In this paper, we provide details of two case studies of children with partial genetic deletions in the WSCR: an 11-year-old female with a deletion of 24 (...)
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  37. Pi-Yueh Cheng & Mei-Chin Chu (2013). Behavioral Factors Affecting Students' Intentions to Enroll in Business Ethics Courses: A Comparison of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory Using Self-Identity as a Moderator. Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.score: 80.0
    The current study used both Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB) and Bandura’s social cognitive theory (SCT) to examine the intentions of business undergraduate students toward taking elective ethics courses and investigated the role of self-identity in this process. The study was prospective in design; data on predictors and intentions were obtained during the first collection of data, whereas the actual behavior was assessed 10 days later. Our results indicated that the TPB was a better predictor of behavioral intentions (...)
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  38. Michael Harre (2013). The Neural Circuitry of Expertise: Perceptual Learning and Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:852.score: 80.0
    Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social (...)
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  39. A. K. Barbey E. E. Hecht, R. Patterson (2012). What Can Other Animals Tell Us About Human Social Cognition? An Evolutionary Perspective on Reflective and Reflexive Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 80.0
    Human neuroscience has seen a recent boom in studies on reflective, controlled, explicit social cognitive functions like imitation, perspective‐taking, and empathy. The relationship of these higher‐level functions to lower‐level, reflexive, automatic, implicit functions is an area of current research. As the field continues to address this relationship, we suggest that an evolutionary, comparative approach will be useful, even essential. There is a large body of research on reflexive, automatic, implicit processes in animals. A growing perspective sees social cognitive (...)
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  40. Melissa J. Green Jesseca E. Rowland, Meelah K. Hamilton, Nicholas Vella, Bianca J. Lino, Philip B. Mitchell (2012). Adaptive Associations Between Social Cognition and Emotion Regulation Are Absent in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 80.0
    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with impairments in facial emotion perception and Theory of Mind (ToM). These social cognitive skills deficits may be related to a reduced capacity to effectively regulate one’s own emotions according to the social context. We therefore set out to examine the relationship between social cognitive abilities and the use of cognitive strategies for regulating negative emotion in SZ and BD. Participants were 56 SZ, 33 BD, and 58 healthy controls (...)
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  41. Danilo Bzdok, Robert Langner, Leonhard Schilbach, Denis A. Engemann, Angela R. Laird, Peter T. Fox & Simon Eickhoff (2013). Segregation of the Human Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 80.0
    While the human medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is widely believed to be a key node of neural networks relevant for socio-emotional processing, its functional subspecialization is still poorly understood. We thus revisited the often assumed differentiation of the mPFC in social cognition along its ventral-dorsal axis. Our neuroinformatic analysis was based on a neuroimaging meta-analysis of perspective-taking that yielded two separate clusters in the ventral and dorsal mPFC, respectively. We determined each seed region’s brain-wide interaction pattern by two (...)
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  42. A. Carlo Altamura Elisabetta Caletti, Riccardo A. Paoli, Alessio Fiorentini, Michela Cigliobianco, Elisa Zugno, Marta Serati, Giulia Orsenigo, Paolo Grillo, Stefano Zago, Alice Caldiroli, Cecilia Prunas, Francesca Giusti, Dario Consonni (2013). Neuropsychology, Social Cognition and Global Functioning Among Bipolar, Schizophrenic Patients and Healthy Controls: Preliminary Data. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 80.0
    This study aimed to determine the extent of impairment in social and non-social cognitive domains in an ecological context comparing bipolar (BD), schizophrenic patients (SKZ) and healthy controls (HC). The sample was enrolled at the Department of Psychiatry of Policlinico Hospital, University of Milan, it includes stabilized schizophrenic patients (n = 30), euthymic bipolar patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 18). Patients and controls completed psychiatric assessment rating scales, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in (...)
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  43. John Michael Joel Krueger (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 80.0
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. Some researchers endorse strong interactionism (SI), which conceptualizes low-level coupling processes as alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. In contrast, we espouse moderate interactionism (MI), which is an integrative approach. Its guiding assumption is that higher-level cognitive processes are likely to have been shaped by the need (...)
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  44. Marc Bekoff (1999). Social Cognition: Exchanging and Sharing Information on the Run. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 51 (1):617-632.score: 78.0
    In this essay I consider various aspects of the rapidly growing field of cognitive ethology, concentrating mainly on evolutionary and comparative discussion of the notion of intentionality. I am not concerned with consciousness, per se, for a concentration on consciousness deflects attention from other, and in many cases more interesting, problems in the study of animal cognition. I consider how, when, where, and (attempt to discuss) why individuals from different taxa exchange social information concerning their beliefs, desires, and (...)
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  45. G. R. Semin & Eliot R. Smith (eds.) (2008). Embodied Grounding: Social, Cognitive, Affective, and Neuroscientific Approaches. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness that a comprehensive understanding of language, cognitive and affective processes, and social and interpersonal phenomena cannot be achieved without understanding the ways these processes are grounded in bodily states. The term ‘embodiment’ captures the common denominator of these developments, which come from several disciplinary perspectives ranging from neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology, and affective sciences. For the first time, this volume brings together these varied developments under one umbrella and (...)
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  46. Michael J. O'Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield (2012). The Influence of Unethical Peer Behavior on Observers' Unethical Behavior: A Social Cognitive Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):117-131.score: 72.0
    The relationship between unethical peer behavior and observers’ unethical behavior traditionally has been examined from a social learning perspective. We employ two additional theoretical lenses, social identity theory and social comparison theory, each of which offers additional insight into this relationship. Data from 600 undergraduate business students in two universities provide support for all the three perspectives, suggesting that unethical behavior is influenced by social learning, social identity, and social comparison processes. Implications for managers (...)
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  47. Tobias Nolte, Danielle Z. Bolling, Caitlin Hudac, Peter Fonagy, Linda C. Mayes & Kevin A. Pelphrey (2013). Brain Mechanisms Underlying the Impact of Attachment-Related Stress on Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:816.score: 72.0
    Mentalizing, in particular the successful attribution of complex mental states to others, is crucial for navigating social interactions. This ability is highly influenced by external factors within one’s daily life, such as stress. We investigated the impact of stress on the brain basis of mentalization in adults. Using a novel modification of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET-R) we compared the differential effects of two personalized stress induction procedures: a general stress induction (GSI) and an attachment-related (...)
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  48. Susannah B. F. Paletz & Christian D. Schunn (2010). A Social‐Cognitive Framework of Multidisciplinary Team Innovation. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):73-95.score: 72.0
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  49. Markus Lappe Roman Liepelt, Anna Stenzel (2012). Specifying Social Cognitive Processes with a Social Dual-Task Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 72.0
    Automatic imitation tasks measuring motor priming effects showed that we directly map observed actions of other agents onto our own motor repertoire (direct matching). A recent joint-action study using a social dual-task paradigm provided evidence for task monitoring. In the present study, we aimed to test a) if automatic imitation is disturbed during joint action and b) if task monitoring is content or time dependent. We used a social dual task that was made of an automatic imitation task (...)
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  50. Jakob Hohwy & Colin Palmer (forthcoming). Social Cognition as Causal Inference: Implications for Common Knowledge and Autism. In John Michael & Mattia Gallotti (eds.), Social Objects and Social Cognition. Springer.score: 70.0
    This chapter explores the idea that the need to establish common knowledge is one feature that makes social cognition stand apart in important ways from cognition in general. We develop this idea on the background of the claim that social cognition is nothing but a type of causal inference. We focus on autism as our test-case, and propose that a specific type of problem with common knowledge processing is implicated in challenges to social (...) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This problem has to do with the individual’s assessment of the reliability of messages that are passed between people as common knowledge emerges. The proposal is developed on the background of our own empirical studies and outlines different ways common knowledge might be comprised. We discuss what these issues may tell us about ASD, about the relation between social and non-social cognition, about social objects, and about the dynamics of social networks. (shrink)
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