Search results for 'Social evolution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Gerald Gaus & John Thrasher (2014). Social Evolution. In Routledge Companion to Social and Political Philosophy.
  2.  28
    Leonid Grinin, Alexander Markov, Markov & Andrey Korotayev (2009). Aromorphoses in Biological and Social Evolution: Some General Rules for Biological and Social Forms of Macroevolution. Social Evolution and History 8 (2).
    The comparison between biological and social macroevolution is a very important (though insufficiently studied) subject whose analysis renders new significant possibilities to comprehend the processes, trends, mechanisms, and peculiarities of each of the two types of macroevolution. Of course, there are a few rather important (and very understandable) differences between them; however, it appears possible to identify a number of fundamental similarities. One may single out at least three fundamental sets of factors determining those similarities. First of all, those (...)
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  3.  14
    Mahdi Muhammad Moosa & S. M. Minhaz Ud-Dean (2011). The Role of Dominance Hierarchy in the Evolution of Social Species. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):203-208.
    A number of animal species from different lineages live socially. One of the features of social living is the formation of dominance hierarchy. Despite its obvious benefit in the survival probability of the species, the hierarchical structureitself poses psychological and physiological burden leading to the chronic activation of stress related pathways. Considering these apparently conflicting observations, here we propose that social hierarchy can act as a selective force in the evolution of social species. We (...)
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  4.  5
    Patrick Forber & Rory Smead (2015). Evolution and the Classification of Social Behavior. Biology and Philosophy 30 (3):405-421.
    Recent studies in the evolution of cooperation have shifted focus from altruistic to mutualistic cooperation. This change in focus is purported to reveal new explanations for the evolution of prosocial behavior. We argue that the common classification scheme for social behavior used to distinguish between altruistic and mutualistic cooperation is flawed because it fails to take into account dynamically relevant game-theoretic features. This leads some arguments about the evolution of cooperation to conflate dynamical scenarios that differ (...)
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  5.  3
    Hendrik Wortmann (2013). Re-Reading Robert E. Park on Social Evolution: An Early Darwinian Conception of Society. Biological Theory 7 (1):69-79.
    Although Darwinian concepts have largely been banned from the social sciences of the last century, they have recently seen a revival in several disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, or economics. Most of the current proponents of evolutionary theorizing in the social sciences avoid references to the older literature on social evolution. On that background, this article presents a contribution to Darwinist thinking in early American sociology that has mainly been overlooked in the literature. As the leading (...)
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  6.  30
    Matt J. Rossano (2011). Cognitive Control: Social Evolution and Emotional Regulation. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):238-241.
    This commentary argues that theories of cognitive control risk being incomplete unless they incorporate social/emotional factors. Social factors very likely played a critical role in the evolution of human cognitive control abilities, and emotional states are the primary regulatory mechanisms of cognitive control.
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  7.  22
    Johannes Martens (2011). Social Evolution and Strategic Thinking. Biology and Philosophy 26 (5):697-715.
    Thinking about organisms as if they were rational agents which could choose their own phenotypic traits according to their fitness values is a common heuristic in the field of evolutionary theory. In a 1998 paper, however, Elliott Sober has emphasized several alleged shortcomings of this kind of analogical reasoning when applied to the analysis of social behaviors. According to him, the main flaw of this heuristic is that it proves to be a misleading tool when it is used for (...)
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  8.  10
    Nancy Glock-Grueneich (2008). Leveraging Higher Education's Role in Social Evolution: A Paradigmatic Strategy. World Futures 64 (5):536-553.
    (2008). Leveraging Higher Education's Role in Social Evolution: A Paradigmatic Strategy. World Futures: Vol. 64, Postformal Thought and Hierarchical Complexity, pp. 536-553.
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  9.  7
    Robert Artigiani (1993). Social Evolution: Paradigms and Problems. World Futures 38 (1):1-16.
    (1993). Social Evolution: Paradigms and problems. World Futures: Vol. 38, Theoretical Achievements and Practical Applications of General Evolutionary Theory, pp. 1-16.
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  10.  7
    Robert Artigiani (1992). Chaos and Constitutionalism: Toward a Post-Modern Theory of Social Evolution. World Futures 34 (1):131-156.
    (1992). Chaos and constitutionalism: Toward a post‐modern theory of social evolution. World Futures: Vol. 34, Evolutionary Models in the Social Sciences, pp. 131-156.
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  11. David Owen (1997). The Dialectical Theory of Progress: A Study of Juergen Habermas' Theory of Social Evolution. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    Both the pragmatic logic of social critique and the idea of a critical social theory presuppose the possibility of distinguishing progressive from regressive forms of social change. Thus, a condition of adequacy of social critique in general, and of critical social theory in particular, is the theoretical capacity to identify progressive social change. I begin this study by showing that, since it incorporates a theory of social evolution, Habermas's conception of critical (...) theory satisfies this condition. ;Habermas's theory of social evolution, however, is a source of much misunderstanding in the literature. I attempt to clarify the theory with a careful reconstruction of its concepts and fundamental theses, and by systematizing the theory as a whole. The central thesis of the theory of social evolution that functions to identify progressive change is that the logic and the content of social change can be distinguished, and that we can rationally reconstruct the developmental logic of the normative structures of societies. I analyze the concept of developmental logic and defend it against some common objections, including the objection that the theory draws a false analogy between the structures of individual maturation and social rationalization. This 'ontogenetic fallacy' is not committed, I argue, because Habermas translates only the formal features of the concept of developmental logic from its genesis in psychology to social theory. ;I conclude by arguing that Habermas's theory of social evolution does entail an adequate conception of progress, but that it is insufficiently differentiated. That is, Habermas's theory explains progress in each of the dimensions of cognitive knowledge and moral insight; but it lacks an explanation of progress in the dimension of expressive self-realization. Drawing upon the conceptual resources of Habermas's theory, I show that it can account for this dimension if it also includes a notion of expressive action that is pre-discursive. (shrink)
     
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  12.  98
    R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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  13.  8
    Mathieu Charbonneau (2015). Mapping Complex Social Transmission: Technical Constraints on the Evolution of Cultures. Biology and Philosophy 30 (4):527-546.
    Social transmission is at the core of cultural evolutionary theory. It occurs when a demonstrator uses mental representations to produce some public displays which in turn allow a learner to acquire similar mental representations. Although cultural evolutionists do not dispute this view of social transmission, they typically abstract away from the multistep nature of the process when they speak of cultural variants at large, thereby referring both to variation and evolutionary change in mental representations as well as in (...)
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  14.  26
    Brian McLoone (2012). Collaboration and Human Social Evolution: Review of Michael Tomasello's Why We Cooperate (MIT Press, 2009). [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):137-147.
    Michael Tomasello’s new book Why We Cooperate explores the ontogeny and evolution of human altruism and human cooperation, paying particular attention to how such behaviors allow humans to create social institutions.
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  15. Brian Skyrms (2006). The Stag Hunt and the Evolution of Social Structure. Cambridge University Press.
    Brian Skyrms, author of the successful Evolution of the Social Contract has written a sequel. The book is a study of ideas of cooperation and collective action. The point of departure is a prototypical story found in Rousseau's A Discourse on Inequality. Rousseau contrasts the pay-off of hunting hare where the risk of non-cooperation is small but the reward is equally small, against the pay-off of hunting the stag where maximum cooperation is required but where the reward is (...)
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  16. Harry Smit (2014). The Social Evolution of Human Nature: From Biology to Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This book sheds new light on the problem of how the human mind evolved. Harry Smit argues that current studies of this problem misguidedly try to solve it by using variants of the Cartesian conception of the mind, and shows that combining the Aristotelian conception with Darwin's theory provides us with far more interesting answers. He discusses the core problem of how we can understand language evolution in terms of inclusive fitness theory, and investigates how scientific and conceptual insights (...)
     
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  17.  3
    Timothy A. Linksvayer, Jeremiah W. Busch & Chris R. Smith (2013). Social Supergenes of Superorganisms: Do Supergenes Play Important Roles in Social Evolution? Bioessays 35 (8):683-689.
  18.  5
    Bradley Franks (2014). The Roles of Evolution in the Social Sciences: Is Biology Ballistic? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (3):288-305.
    This paper discusses some widespread but often not fully articulated views concerning the possible roles of biology and evolution in the social sciences. Such views cluster around a set of intuitions that suggest that evolution's role is “ballistic”: it constitutes a starting point for mind that has been, and is, superseded by the role of culture and social construction. An implication is that evolved and the socially constructed aspects of mind are separable and independent, with the (...)
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  19. Brenda E. Joyner & Dinah Payne (2002). Evolution and Implementation: A Study of Values, Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (4):297 - 311.
    There is growing recognition that good ethics can have a positive economic impact on the performance of firms. Many statistics support the premise that ethics, values, integrity and responsibility are required in the modern workplace. For consumer groups and society at large, research has shown that good ethics is good business. This study defines and traces the emergence and evolution within the business literature of the concepts of values, business ethics and corporate social responsibility to illustrate the increased (...)
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  20.  20
    Kim Shaw-Williams (2013). The Social Trackways Theory of the Evolution of Human Cognition. Biological Theory 9 (1):1-11.
    Only our lineage has ever used trackways reading to find unseen and unheard targets. All other terrestrial animals, including our great ape cousins, use scent trails and airborne odors. Because trackways as natural signs have very different properties, they possess an information-rich narrative structure. There is good evidence we began to exploit conspecific trackways in our deep past, at first purely associatively, for safety and orienteering when foraging in vast featureless wetlands. Since our own old trackways were recognizable they were (...)
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  21.  28
    Altug Yalcintas (2011). A Review Essay on David Laibman's Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential. Journal of Philosophical Economics 5 (1):168-182.
    The frequency of historical materialist explanations in evolutionary social sciences is very low even though historical materialism and evolutionism have great many shared aims towards explaining the long term social change. David Laibman in his Deep History (2007) picks up some of the standard questions of evolutionary social theory and aims at advancing the conception of historical materialism so as to develop a Marxist theory of history from an evolutionary point of view. The contribution of Laibman’s work (...)
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  22.  15
    Eörs Szathmáry (2012). Transitions and Social Evolution. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 4 (20130604).
    This is a lovely and very useful book. It deals with the emergence of higher and higher level units of evolution, especially regarding what Queller (1997) called “fraternal major transitions.” These are evolutionary transitions where the lower-level units that gang up are genetically alike and, therefore, the initial advantage is likely to come from the economy of scale rather than the complementation of function, as in the case of “egalitarian transitions.” Simple division of labor may arise from simple conditions (...)
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  23.  2
    Fred Dallmayr (1976). "Natural History" And Social Evolution: Reflections On Vico's Corsi E Ricorsi. Social Research 43.
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  24.  1
    Edward Wilson (1973). On the Queerness of Social Evolution. Social Research 40.
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  25. Kiichiro Yagi (2011). Austrian and German Economic Thought: From Subjectivism to Social Evolution. Routledge.
    This book intends to renovate the view of social sciences in the German-speaking world. It explores the intellectual tension in the social science in Austria and Germany in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It deals with how the emergence of the new school changed the focus of social science in the German speaking world, and how it prepared the introduction of an evolutionary perspective in economics, politics, and sociology. Based on primary evidence, this development is lively described (...)
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  26.  6
    R. Smead (2015). The Role of Social Interaction in the Evolution of Learning. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (1):161-180.
    It is generally thought that cognition evolved to help us navigate complex environments. Social interactions make up one part of a complex environment, and some have argued that social settings are crucial to the evolution of cognition. This article uses the methods of evolutionary game theory to investigate the effect of social interaction on the evolution of cognition broadly construed as strategic learning or plasticity. I delineate the conditions under which social interaction alone, apart (...)
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  27.  22
    Donald T. Campbell (1976). On the Conflicts Between Biological and Social Evolution and Between Psychology and Moral Tradition. Zygon 11 (3):167-208.
  28.  17
    I. W. Howerth (1927). The First Principle of Social Evolution. The Monist 37 (2):183-198.
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  29.  15
    Duur K. Aanen, Alfons Jm Debets, Jagm de Visser & Rolf F. Hoekstra (2008). The Social Evolution of Somatic Fusion. Bioessays 30 (11‐12):1193-1203.
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  30.  17
    Robert R. Hull (1927). The New Realists and the American Social Evolution. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):252-276.
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  31.  68
    Joseph E. Earley (2002). The Social Evolution of Consciousness. Journal of Humanistic Psychology 42 (1):107-132.
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  32.  24
    Jean Lachapelle (2000). Cultural Evolution, Reductionism in the Social Sciences, and Explanatory Pluralism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):331-361.
    This article argues that it is possible to bring the social sciences into evolutionary focus without being committed to a thesis the author calls ontological reductionism, which is a widespread predilection for lower-level explanations. After showing why we should reject ontological reductionism, the author argues that there is a way to construe cultural evolution that does justice to the autonomy of social science explanations. This paves the way for a liberal approach to explanation the author calls (...) pluralism, which allows for the possibility of explaining cultural phenomena in terms of different evolutionary processes. Key Words: cultural evolution • reductionism • explanatory pluralism • evolutionary psychology. (shrink)
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  33. Paul W. Sherman & Hudson K. Reeve (1997). Forward and Backward: Alternative Approaches to Studying Human Social Evolution. Human Nature: A Critical Reader 11:147.
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  34. D. Laibman (2003). Food, Social Evolution, and Conquest. Science and Society 67 (2):127-135.
     
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  35. Barbara Smuts (2006). Emergence in Social Evolution: A Great Ape Example. In P. Davies & P. Clayton (eds.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence. Oxford University Press 166.
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  36.  6
    Emilia Digby (1895). Social Evolution Through the Ethical Law. The Monist 6 (1):135-138.
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  37.  6
    T. Whittaker (1914). Book Review:Intermediate Types Among Primitive Folk: A Study in Social Evolution. Edward Carpenter. [REVIEW] Ethics 25 (1):110-.
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  38.  5
    Dmitri M. Bondarenko, Leonid E. Grinin & Andrey V. Korotayev (2004). Alternatives of Social Evolution. In Leonid Grinin, Robert Carneiro, Dmitri Bondarenko, Nikolay Kradin & Andrey Korotayev (eds.), The Early State, its Alternatives and Analogues. ‘Uchitel’ Publishing House 3--27.
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  39. Carel P. van Schaik (1996). Social Evolution in Primates: The Role of Ecological Factors and Male Behaviour. Proceedings of the British Academy 88:9-31.
     
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  40.  2
    Karl-Dieter Opp (1979). Social Evolution: Learning Theory Applied to Group Action. Theory and Decision 10 (1-4):229-243.
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  41.  1
    Michael Philips & S. N. Austad (1996). Animal Communication and Social Evolution. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press 257--267.
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  42. Riane Eisler (1991). Technology, Gender, and History: Toward a Nonlinear Model of Social Evolution. World Futures 32 (4):207-225.
  43.  7
    David G. Ritchie (1896). Social Evolution. International Journal of Ethics 6 (2):165-181.
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  44. Robert Layton & Sean O'Hara (2010). 5 Human Social Evolution: A Comparison of Hunter-Gatherer and Chimpanzee Social Organization. Proceedings of the British Academy 158:83.
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  45.  8
    D. G. Ritchie (1894). Book Review:Social Evolution. Benjamin Kidd. [REVIEW] Ethics 5 (1):107-.
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  46.  2
    H. J. Fleure (1951). Social Evolution. The Eugenics Review 43 (2):99.
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  47. Benjamin Kidd (1895). Social Evolution. Philosophical Review 4 (1):82-85.
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  48.  5
    Robert Artigiani (1991). Post-Modernism and Social Evolution: An Inquiry. World Futures 30 (3):149-161.
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  49.  2
    Graeme Kirkpatrick (2003). Evolution or Progress? A (Critical) Defence of Habermas's Theory of Social Development. Thesis Eleven 72 (1):91-112.
    Habermas's theory of social evolution has been subjected to critique by environmentally motivated sociologists. They argue that his decision to recast social theory in terms of an extended, if selective analogy with biology leads him into a set of practical positions that are irreconcilable with Green politics and inconsistent with the goals of traditional critical theory. This article argues that these criticisms are based on an inaccurate assessment of the role of evolutionary concepts in Habermas's thought. By (...)
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  50.  3
    Hu Hao & Lou Huixin (1990). Abstracts of a Series of Papers Concerning General Evolution and Social Evolution. World Futures 30 (1):95-99.
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