Search results for 'Social networks' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  13
    Stephen Chen (2009). Corporate Responsibilities in Internet-Enabled Social Networks. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):523 - 536.
    As demonstrated by the popularity of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, Internet-based social networks have become an important part of daily life, and many businesses are now involved in such networks either as service providers or as participants. Furthermore, inter-organizational networks are becoming an increasingly common feature of many industries, not only on the Internet. However, despite the growing importance of networks for businesses, there is little theoretical study on the (...) responsibilities of businesses in such networks, and how these responsibilities are affected by different types of networks. This article explores how social network analysis, which has been developed from studies of social networks of individuals, can be used to shed light on corporate responsibilities in social networks. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2.  20
    Fiachra O’Brolcháin, Tim Jacquemard, David Monaghan, Noel O’Connor, Peter Novitzky & Bert Gordijn (2016). The Convergence of Virtual Reality and Social Networks: Threats to Privacy and Autonomy. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):1-29.
    The rapid evolution of information, communication and entertainment technologies will transform the lives of citizens and ultimately transform society. This paper focuses on ethical issues associated with the likely convergence of virtual realities and social networks, hereafter VRSNs. We examine a scenario in which a significant segment of the world’s population has a presence in a VRSN. Given the pace of technological development and the popularity of these new forms of social interaction, this scenario is plausible. However, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  4
    Kristen C. Nelson, Rachel F. Brummel, Nicholas Jordan & Steven Manson (2014). Social Networks in Complex Human and Natural Systems: The Case of Rotational Grazing, Weak Ties, and Eastern US Dairy Landscapes. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):245-259.
    Multifunctional agricultural systems seek to expand upon production-based benefits to enhance family wellbeing and animal health, reduce inputs, and improve environmental services such as biodiversity and water quality. However, in many countries a landscape-level conversion is uneven at best and stalled at worst. This is particularly true across the eastern rural landscape in the United States. We explore the role of social networks as drivers of system transformation within dairy production in the eastern United States, specifically rotational grazing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  14
    Sonja Grabner-Kräuter (2009). Web 2.0 Social Networks: The Role of Trust. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):505 - 522.
    Online social networks (OSNs) have gained enormous popularity in recent years. Hundreds of millions of social network users reveal great amounts of personal information in the Web 2.0 environment that is largely devoid of security standards and practices. The central question in this article is why so many social network users are being so trusting. The focus is on theory-building on trust as a critical issue in OSNs. A theoretical framework is developed, which facilitates a multi-level (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  33
    Hanna Krasnova, Oliver Günther, Sarah Spiekermann & Ksenia Koroleva (2009). Privacy Concerns and Identity in Online Social Networks. Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):39-63.
    Driven by privacy-related fears, users of Online Social Networks may start to reduce their network activities. This trend can have a negative impact on network sustainability and its business value. Nevertheless, very little is understood about the privacy-related concerns of users and the impact of those concerns on identity performance. To close this gap, we take a systematic view of user privacy concerns on such platforms. Based on insights from focus groups and an empirical study with 210 subjects, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  18
    Terry Beckman, Alison Colwell & Peggy H. Cunningham (2009). The Emergence of Corporate Social Responsibility in Chile: The Importance of Authenticity and Social Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):191 - 206.
    Little is known about how and why corporate social responsibility (CSR) emerged in lesser developed countries. In order to address this knowledge gap, we used Chile as a test case and conducted a series of in-depth interviews with leaders of CSR initiatives. We also did an Internet and literature search to help provide support for the findings that emerged from our data. We discovered that while there are similarities in the drivers of CSR in developed countries, there are distinct (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  7.  20
    Brendan Van Alsenoy, Joris Ballet, Aleksandra Kuczerawy & Jos Dumortier (2009). Social Networks and Web 2.0: Are Users Also Bound by Data Protection Regulations? [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):65-79.
    Directive 95/46/EC and implementing legislation define the respective obligations and liabilities of the different actors that may be involved in a personal data processing operation. There are certain exceptions to the scope of these regulations, among which processing which is carried out by natural persons in the course of activities that may be considered ‘purely personal’. The purpose of this article is to investigate the liability of users of social network sites under data protection and to assess the extent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  29
    Tommaso Bertolotti & Lorenzo Magnani (2013). A Philosophical and Evolutionary Approach to Cyber-Bullying: Social Networks and the Disruption of Sub-Moralities. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (4):285-299.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  19
    Marko Puljic & Robert Kozma (2005). Activation Clustering in Neural and Social Networks. Complexity 10 (4):42-50.
  10.  5
    Allison K. Shaw, Milena Tsvetkova & Roozbeh Daneshvar (2011). The Effect of Gossip on Social Networks. Complexity 16 (4):39-47.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  9
    John Skvoretz (2002). Complexity Theory and Models for Social Networks. Complexity 8 (1):47-55.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Robert Strathdee (2008). Tertiary Education in the 21st Century: Economic Change and Social Networks. Palgrave Macmillan.
  13.  7
    Holger Ebel, Jörn Davidsen & Stefan Bornholdt (2002). Dynamics of Social Networks. Complexity 8 (2):24-27.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  10
    Shaheena Janjuha-Jivraj (2003). The Sustainability of Social Capital Within Ethnic Networks. Journal of Business Ethics 47 (1):31 - 43.
    This paper examines informal networks that support the British Asian business community. Ethnic communities have been crucial to facilitating the economic development of their migrant members, as they make the transition from economic refugees to citizens. The basis of this informal support is the notion of social capital offered to kinsmen who arrived with finite resources. However, as successive generations have become more integrated with the wider community reliance on these resources is forecast to decrease. Research has shown (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  15.  12
    Lan Anh Hoang, Jean-Christophe Castella & Paul Novosad (2006). Social Networks and Information Access: Implications for Agricultural Extension in a Rice Farming Community in Northern Vietnam. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):513-527.
    Village communities are not homogeneous entities but a combination of complex networks of social relationships. Many factors such as ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, and power relations determine one’s access to information and resources. Development workers’ inadequate understanding of local social networks, norms, and power relations may further the interests of better-off farmers and marginalize the poor. This paper explores how social networks function as assets for individuals and households in the rural areas of developing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  7
    Giuseppina Migliore, Giorgio Schifani, Giovanni Dara Guccione & Luigi Cembalo (2014). Food Community Networks as Leverage for Social Embeddedness. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):549-567.
    Social embeddedness, defined as the interaction of economic activities and social behavior, is used in this study as a conceptual tool to describe the growing phenomenon of food community networks (FCNs). The aim in this paper was to map the system of relations which the FCNs develop both inside and outside the network and, from the number of relations, it was inferred the influence of each FCN upon the formation of new socially embedded economic realities. A particular (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  3
    Yuval Elovici, Michael Fire, Amir Herzberg & Haya Shulman (2014). Ethical Considerations When Employing Fake Identities in Online Social Networks for Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):1027-1043.
    Online social networks have rapidly become a prominent and widely used service, offering a wealth of personal and sensitive information with significant security and privacy implications. Hence, OSNs are also an important—and popular—subject for research. To perform research based on real-life evidence, however, researchers may need to access OSN data, such as texts and files uploaded by users and connections among users. This raises significant ethical problems. Currently, there are no clear ethical guidelines, and researchers may end up (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  6
    Carla C. J. M. Millar & Chong Ju Choi (2009). Networks, Social Norms and Knowledge Sub-Networks. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):565 - 574.
    Networks and the World Wide Web seem to provide an answer to efficiently creating and disseminating knowledge resources. Knowledge, however, is ambiguous in character, and contains both explicit (information) and tacit dimensions - the latter being difficult to value as well as to transfer. Participant identity, commitment and behaviour within the network also affect the sharing of knowledge. Hence, existing laws and norms (including property rights) which have been established on the basis of discrete transactions and monetary value-oriented exchange (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  19
    Sarah Jastram (2010). Transnational Norm-Building Networks and the Legitimacy of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):223 - 239.
    In the following article, we propose an analytical framework for the analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Standards based on the paradigmatic nexus of voice and entitlement. We follow the theory of decentration and present the concept of Transnational Norm-Building Networks (TNNs), which — as we argue — comprise a new nexus of voice and entitlement beyond the nation—state level. Furthermore, we apply the analytical framework to the ISO 26000 initiative and the Global Compact. We conclude the article (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  16
    Daisuke Okamoto (2009). Social Relationship of a Firm and the Csp–Cfp Relationship in Japan: Using Artificial Neural Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):117 - 132.
    As a criterion of a good firm, a lucrative and growing business has been said to be important. Recently, however, high profitability and high growth potential are insufficient for the criteria, because social influences exerted by recent firms have been extremely significant. In this paper, high social relationship is added to the list of the criteria. Empirical corporate social performance versus corporate financial performance (CSP–CFP) relationship studies that consider social relationship are very limited in Japan, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  5
    R. I. M. Dunbar & M. Spoors (1995). Social Networks, Support Cliques, and Kinship. Human Nature 6 (3):273-290.
    Data on the number of adults that an individual contacts at least once a month in a set of British populations yield estimates of network sizes that correspond closely to those of the typical “sympathy group” size in humans. Men and women do not differ in their total network size, but women have more females and more kin in their networks than men do. Kin account for a significantly higher proportion of network members than would be expected by chance. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  22.  6
    Jan A. Fuhse (2009). The Meaning Structure of Social Networks. Sociological Theory 27 (1):51 - 73.
    This essay proposes to view networks as sociocultural structures. Following authors from Leopold von Wiese and Norbert Elias to Gary Alan Fine and Harrison White, networks are configurations of social relationships interwoven with meaning. Social relationships as the basic building blocks of networks are conceived of as dynamic structures of reciprocal (but not necessarily symmetric) expectations between alter and ego. Through their transactions, alter and ego construct an idiosyncratic "relationship culture" comprising symbols, narratives, and relational (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  23.  14
    Tanja Staehler, Social Networks as Inauthentic Sociality.
    This article argues that social networks constitute an inauthentic form of sociality. The two component concepts of this claim, inauthenticity and sociality, are explored in order to avoid some widespread misinterpretations. Inauthenticity is examined on the basis of the relevant sections in Heidegger’s 'Being and Time', first with respect to its main characteristics, then in terms of what motivates it and its benefits, and finally with respect to its status as a non-normative concept. The second part of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  32
    Norah Mulvaney-Day & Catherine A. Womack (2009). Obesity, Identity and Community: Leveraging Social Networks for Behavior Change in Public Health. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):250-260.
    Obesity is a public health problem influenced by behavioral patterns that span an ecological spectrum of individual-level factors, social network factors and environmental factors. Both individual and environmental approaches necessarily include significant influences from social networks, but how and under what conditions social networks influence behavior change is often not clearly mapped out either in the obesity literature or in many intervention designs. In this paper, we provide an analysis of recent empirical work in obesity (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  7
    Prasanta K. Pattanaik & Yongsheng Xu (2007). On Measuring Personal Connections and the Extent of Social Networks. Analyse & Kritik 29 (2):290-310.
    The notions of personal connection and social networks are key ingredients of the increasingly important concept of social capital in social sciences in general and in economics in particular. This paper discusses the problem of measuring personal connection and the extent of social networks that may exist in a society. For this purpose we develop several conceptual and analytical frameworks. In the process, we axiomatically characterize several measures of personal connection and social (...). (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  2
    Krzysztof R. Apt, Evangelos Markakis & Sunil Simon (2016). Paradoxes in Social Networks with Multiple Products. Synthese 193 (3):663-687.
    We show that various paradoxes can arise in a natural class of social networks. They demonstrate that more services or products may have adverse consequences for all members of the network and conversely that restricting the number of choices may be beneficial for every member of the network. These phenomena have been confirmed by a number of empirical studies. In our analysis we use a simple threshold model of social networks introduced in Apt and Markakis, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  10
    Robert Evans (2007). Social Networks and Private Spaces in Economic Forecasting. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):686-697.
    The outputs of economic forecasting—predictions for national economic indicators such as GDP, unemployment rates and inflation—are all highly visible. The production of these forecasts is a much more private affair, however, typically being thought of as the work of individual forecasters or forecast teams using their economic model to produce a forecast that is then made public. This conception over-emphasises the individual and the technical whilst silencing the broader social context through which economic forecasters develop the expertise that is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  40
    Erik J. Olsson & Aron Vallinder (2013). Norms of Assertion and Communication in Social Networks. Synthese 190 (13):2557-2571.
    Epistemologists can be divided into two camps: those who think that nothing short of certainty or (subjective) probability 1 can warrant assertion and those who disagree with this claim. This paper addressed this issue by inquiring into the problem of setting the probability threshold required for assertion in such a way that that the social epistemic good is maximized, where the latter is taken to be the veritistic value in the sense of Goldman (Knowledge in a social world, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29.  22
    Dawn Jutla (2010). Layering Privacy on Operating Systems, Social Networks, and Other Platforms by Design. Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):319-341.
    Pervasive, easy-to-use privacy services are keys to enabling users to maintain control of their private data in the online environment. This paper proposes (1) an online privacy lifecycle from the user perspective that drives and categorizes the development of these services, (2) a layered platform design solution for online privacy, (3) the evolution of the PeCAN (Personal Context Agent Networking) architecture to a platform for pervasively providing multiple contexts for user privacy preferences and online informational privacy services, and (4) use (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  5
    Christina Stoica‐Klüver & Jürgen Klüver (2007). Interacting Neural Networks and the Emergence of Social Structure. Complexity 12 (3):41-52.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  6
    Martin Pekárek & Stefanie Pötzsch (2009). A Comparison of Privacy Issues in Collaborative Workspaces and Social Networks. Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):81-93.
    With the advent of Web 2.0, numerous social software applications allow people to publish and share information on the Internet. Two of these types of applications – collaborative workspaces and social network sites – have a number of features in common, which are explored to provide a basis for comparative analysis. This basis is extended with a suitable definition of privacy, a sociological perspective and an applicable adversary model in order to facilitate an investigation of similarities and differences (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  17
    Rachel Schurman & William Munro (2006). Ideas, Thinkers, and Social Networks: The Process of Grievance Construction in the Anti-Genetic Engineering Movement. Theory and Society 35 (1):1-38.
  33.  16
    Haifeng Du, Marcus W. Feldman, Shuzhuo Li & Xiaoyi Jin (2007). An Algorithm for Detecting Community Structure of Social Networks Based on Prior Knowledge and Modularity. Complexity 12 (3):53-60.
  34.  4
    Tom Wang (2016). Designing Confucian Conscience Into Social Networks. Zygon 51 (2):239-256.
    Several scholars have argued that Internet use might be fundamentally incompatible with Confucian ethics, because the values that are embedded in the Internet might be in conflict with Confucian values. In addition, the design of various social network services considers very little of non-Western values in its engineering. Against this background, this article explores the philosophical question of whether Internet use, particularly social network services, is compatible with the fundamental values and norms of Confucian ethics. In addition, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  12
    Vincent Buskens & Jeroen Weesie (2000). Cooperation Via Social Networks. Analyse & Kritik 22 (1):44-74.
    Sufficiently frequent interaction between partners has been identified by, a.o., Axelrod as a more-or-less sufficient condition for stable cooperation. The underlying argument is that rational cooperation is ensured if short-term benefits from opportunistic behavior are offset by the long-term costs of sanctions imposed on the culprit. In this paper, we develop a model for 'embedded trust' in which a trustee interacts with a number of trustors who may communicate via a social network with each other about the behavior of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  33
    Kai A. Schafft & David L. Brown (2003). Social Capital, Social Networks, and Social Power. Social Epistemology 17 (4):329 – 342.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  2
    Kathryn J. L. Jacobson, Jacqueline N. Hood & Harry J. Van Buren (2014). Beyond the CEO: Diffusing Corporate Social Responsibility Throughout the Organization Through Social Networks. Business and Society Review 119 (3):337-358.
    Chief Executive Officers and other organizational leaders can affect how corporate social responsibility initiatives are perceived in their organizations. However, in order to be successful with regard to promoting CSR, leaders need to have strong network competencies and to move beyond charismatic leadership. In this paper we offer a critique of charismatic leadership as it relates to CSR, posit that the intellectual stimulation brought about by transformational leadership is more important in this regard, propose that internal and networking is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Shahadat Uddin, Arif Khan & Mahendra Piraveenan (forthcoming). A Set of Measures to Quantify the Dynamicity of Longitudinal Social Networks. Complexity:n/a-n/a.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  1
    J. Littmann & A. Kessel (2014). Accounting for the Costs of Contact Tracing Through Social Networks. Public Health Ethics 7 (1):51-53.
    This article critically engages with Mandeville et al.'s case discussion of using social networking services for the purposes of contact tracing in infectious disease outbreaks. It will be argued that their discussion may be overstating the utility of such approaches, while simultaneously underestimating the ethical concerns that arise from this method of contact tracing. The article separates between ethical and technological concerns and suggests that due to the particular design of networking sites such as Facebook and the usage patterns (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Ray-May Hsung, Nan Lin & Ronald Breiger (2010). Contexts of Social Capital : Social Networks in Communities, Markets, and Organizations. In Ann Brooks (ed.), Social Theory in Contemporary Asia. Routledge
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  3
    Seung Hwan Mark Lee (2013). Ethics and Expertise: A Social Networks Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):607-621.
    Results from three field network studies show that depending on individuals’ network positions (central or peripheral), experts and novices have varying ethical predispositions (EP). In particular, central experts (vs. peripheral experts) have higher EP, while novices in the same positions (vs. peripheral novices) have lower EP. Results demonstrate individuals’ relational-interdependent self-construal mediates these relationships. Importantly, this research suggests that the interaction between network and individual difference variables uniquely affect individuals’ ethical predisposition. Given the lack of research focus on the impact (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  1
    Elodie Gentina, Gregory M. Rose & Scott J. Vitell (forthcoming). Ethics During Adolescence: A Social Networks Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43. Sam Gb Roberts (2010). 6 Constraints on Social Networks. Proceedings of the British Academy 158:115.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  13
    Mohsen Lesani & Niloufar Montazeri (2009). Fuzzy Trust Aggregation and Personalized Trust Inference in Virtual Social Networks. In L. Magnani (ed.), Computational Intelligence. 25--2.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  8
    George Masterton & Erik J. Olsson, Argumentation and Belief Updating in Social Networks: A Bayesian Approach.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  9
    Bill McKelvey (2008). Keith Douglass Warner, Agroecology in Action: Extending Alternative Agriculture Through Social Networks. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):615-616.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  13
    Fiona Coward (2010). Small Worlds, Material Culture and Ancient Near Eastern Social Networks. Proceedings of the British Academy 158:453-484.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  26
    Gary Banham (2010). Social Networks. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):22-23.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  23
    James S. Coleman (1988). Free Riders and Zealots: The Role of Social Networks. Sociological Theory 6 (1):52-57.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50.  10
    Lynne Hamill & Nigel Gilbert (2010). Simulating Large Social Networks in Agent-Based Models: A Social Circle Model. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 12 (4):78-94.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000