Search results for 'Social phil master-slave dialectic politics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  26
    James Schmidt (1979). Lordship and Bondage in Merleau-Ponty and Sartre. Political Theory 7 (2):201-227.
    The article examines the use made of hegel's dialectic of lordship and bondage in kojeve, sartre and merleau-ponty as a means of discussing the problem of merging a phenomenology of social life with a dialectical conception of philosophical narration. it is argued that neither sartre nor merleau-ponty can reconcile phenomenology and dialectic without an ontologizing of politics which ultimately provides a misleadingly abstract account of political life. while concentrating on the period 1945-1955, the article draws out (...)
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  2.  80
    Jack Reynolds (2009). The Master-Slave Dialectic and the 'Sado-Masochistic Entity': Some Objections. Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities 14 (3):11-25.
    Hegel’s famous analyses of the ‘master-slave dialectic’, and the more general struggle for recognition which it is a part of, have been remarkably influential throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Bound up with the dominance of this idea, however, has been a corresponding treatment of sadism and masochism as complicit projects that are mutually necessary for one another in a manner that is structurally isomorphic with the way in which master and slave depend on one another. In clinical (...)
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  3.  7
    Howard P. Kainz (1973). A Non-Marxian Application of the Hegelian Master-Slave Dialectic to Some Modern Politico-Social Developments. Idealistic Studies 3 (3):285-302.
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  4.  73
    Jack Reynolds (2008). Deleuze's Other-Structure: Beyond the Master-Slave Dialectic, But at What Cost? Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 12 (1):67-88.
    Deleuze suggests that his work grounds a new conception of the Other–the Other as expression of a possible world, as a structure that precedes any subsequent dialectical mediation, including the master-slave dialectic of social relations. I will argue, however, that the ethico-political injunction that Deleuze derives from his analysis of the 'other-structure' confronts a different problem. It commits Deleuze to either tacitly prescribing a romantic morality of difference that valorizes expressive encounters without 'relations of explication' and any (...)
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  5.  37
    S. Bird-Pollan (2012). Hegel's Grounding of Intersubjectivity in the Master-Slave Dialectic. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (3):237-256.
    In this article I seek to explain Hegel’s significance to contemporary meta-ethics, in particular to Kantian constructivism. I argue that in the master–slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit , Hegel shows that self-consciousness and intersubjectivity arise at the same time. This point, I argue, shows that there is no problem with taking other people’s reasons to motivate us since reflection on our aims is necessarily also reflection on the needs of those around us. I further explore Hegel’s contribution (...)
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  6.  2
    Elisa Magrì (2016). A Note on Some Contemporary Readings of Hegel's Master-Slave Dialectic. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):257-291.
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  7. Gregory Alan Phipps (2011). Desire, Death, and Women in the Master-Slave Dialectic: A Comparative Reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit_ and Henry James's _The Golden Bowl. Philosophy and Literature 35 (2):233-250.
    From Karl Marx to Alexandre Kojève to Luce Irigaray, many writers have explored the implications of the famous master-slave dialectic in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.1 An interesting debate has developed out of the possible gender connotations of this dialectic—a debate that has centered largely on the theory that the master could represent man, with the slave consequently representing woman. A close analysis of the Phenomenology reveals that both the master and the slave are, in fact, supposed to (...)
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  8.  22
    Matheus Pelegrino da Silva (2015). A Critical Analysis of the Philosophical-Political Element of the Master-Slave Dialectic. Trans/Form/Ação 38 (3):9-24.
    ABSTRACT:The section “Lordship and Bondage” in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit offers us, through the criticism of slavery, some indications regarding Hegel’s conception of human nature. In this paper some consequences of this conception for Hegel’s political philosophy are identified and presented. The analysis shows problems may emerge when we analyze some fundamental Hegelian concepts – “recognition” and shows that some “men” – if we take into consideration the way these concepts were defined in the master-slave dialectic. In light (...)
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  9.  36
    Robert Stern (2012). Is Hegel's Master–Slave Dialectic a Refutation of Solipsism? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):333-361.
    This paper considers whether Hegel's master/slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit should be considered as a refutation of solipsism. It focuses on a recent and detailed attempt to argue for this sort of reading that has been proposed by Frederick Beiser ? but it argues that this reading is unconvincing, both in the historical motivations given for it in the work of Jacobi and Fichte, and as an interpretation of the text itself. An alternative reading of the (...) is proposed, where it is argued that the central problem Hegel is concerned with is not solipsism, but the sociality of freedom. (shrink)
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  10.  12
    Anne Morgan (2009). Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics, the Master/Slave Dialectic, and Eichmann as a Sub-Man. Hypatia 24 (2):39 - 53.
    Simone de Beauvoir incorporates a significantly altered form of the Hegelian master/slave dialectic into "The Ethics of Ambiguity." Her ethical theory explains and denounces extreme wrongdoing, such as the mass murder of millions of Jews at the hands of the Nazis. This essay demonstrates that, in the Beauvoirean dialectic, the Nazi value system (and Hitler) was the master, Adolf Eichmann was a slave, and Jews were denied human status. The analysis counters Robin May Schott's claims that "Beauvoir portrays (...)
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  11.  13
    Jack Reynolds (2009). The Master-Slave Dialectic and the “Sado-Masochistic Entity”. Angelaki 14 (3):11-26.
  12.  60
    Lajos L. Brons (2015). Othering, an Analysis. Transcience, a Journal of Global Studies 6 (1):69-90.
    Othering is the construction and identification of the self or in-group and the other or out-group in mutual, unequal opposition by attributing relative inferiority and/or radical alienness to the other/out-group. The notion of othering spread from feminist theory and post-colonial studies to other areas of the humanities and social sciences, but is originally rooted in Hegel’s dialectic of identification and distantiation in the encounter of the self with some other in his “Master-Slave dialectic”. In this paper, (...)
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  13.  1
    Sarah L. Berry (2014). “[No] Doctor but My Master”: Health Reform and Antislavery Rhetoric in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Journal of Medical Humanities 35 (1):1-18.
    This essay examines Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl in light of new archival findings on the medical practices of Dr. James Norcom . While critics have sharply defined the feminist politics of Jacobs’s sexual victimization and resistance, they have overlooked her medical experience in slavery and her participation in reform after escape. I argue that Jacobs uses the rhetoric of a woman-led health reform movement underway during the 1850s to persuade her readers to end (...)
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  14.  2
    Tina Chanter, Does Antigone Stand or Fall in Relation to Hegel's Master-Slave Dialectic? A Response to Derrida's Glas.
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  15.  23
    Ofelia M. Schutte (1990). The Master-Slave Dialectic in Latin America. The Owl of Minerva 22 (1):5-18.
  16.  4
    Debbie Evans (2009). Sartre and Beauvoir on Hegel's Master-Slave Dialectic and the Question of the 'Look'. In Christine Daigle & Jacob Golomb (eds.), Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence. Indiana University Press 90--115.
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  17.  80
    Jason Brennan (2007). Dominating Nature. Environmental Values 16 (4):513-528.
    Something is wrong with the desire to dominate nature. In this paper, I explain both the causes and solution to anti-environmental attitudes within the framework of Hegel's master–slave dialectic. I argue that the master–slave dialectic (interpreted as a metaphor, rather than literally) can provide reasons against taking an attitude of domination, and instead gives reasons to seek to be worthy of respect from nature, though nature cannot, of course, respect us. I then discuss what the social and (...)
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  18. Wilfried Ver Eecke (2014). The Absence of Reflection on Language in Hegel’s Master/Slave Dialectic. Hegel-Jahrbuch 2014 (1).
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  19. Farhang Erfani (2003). Democratic Struggle: Tocqueville's Reconfiguration Of Hegel's Master And Slave Dialectic. Florida Philosophical Review 3 (2):23-44.
    There are at least two different ways of coping with struggles: one is to eliminate them—this is the way that Plato, Hegel, Marx and many others chose—and the other is to institutionalize them—this is Tocqueville's democratic way. I first outline the main elements of Hegel's approach, with a specific focus on the Phenomenology of Spirit. My aim is to emphasize that, for Hegel, the goal of political philosophy must be a reconciled polis, which can happen only if and when the (...)
     
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  20.  31
    Richard A. Lynch (2001). Mutual Recognition and the Dialectic of Master and Slave. International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):33-48.
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  21. William Callison (2011). Nietzsche and Hegel: Identity Formation and the Slave/Master Dialectic. Gnosis 9 (3):1-15.
     
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  22.  63
    Roy Bhaskar (2008). Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom. Routledge.
    Introduction: Critical realism, hegelian dialectic and the problems of philosophy preliminary considerations -- Objectives of the book -- Dialectic : an initial orientation -- Negation -- Four degrees of critical realism -- Prima facie objections to critical realism -- On the sources and general character of the hegelian dialectic -- On the immanent critique and limitations of the hegelian dialectic -- The fine structure of the hegelian dialectic -- Dialectic : the logic of absence, (...)
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  23.  83
    Remo Bodei (2007). The Roots of Hegel's "Master-Slave Relationship". Critical Horizons 8 (1):33-46.
    Hegel continues to be credited with the discovery of a "master-slave dialectic". Critics, however, have established that there was no "master-slave dialectic" but rather a Knecht, that is, servant or footman, with the latter a member of an abstract relationship of Herrschaft-Knechtschaft, which is central to Hegel's idea of the journey from dependence to independence. This "primitive scene" sets up a cycle for the whole paradigm, which is a reformulation of the victory over animal life and (...)
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  24.  15
    Glen S. Coulthard (2007). Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the |[Lsquo]|Politics of Recognition|[Rsquo]| in Canada. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437.
    Over the last 30 years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of 'recognition' — recognition of cultural distinctiveness, recognition of an inherent right to self-government, recognition of state treaty obligations, and so on. In addition, the last 15 years have witnessed a proliferation of theoretical work aimed at fleshing out the ethical, legal and political significance of these types of claims. Subsequently, 'recognition' has now come to occupy a central (...)
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  25.  15
    Simon Mussell (2013). 'Pervaded by a Chill':1 The Dialectic of Coldness in Adorno's Social Theory. Thesis Eleven 117 (1):55-67.
    This article examines some of the ways in which the trope of coldness appears in the social theory of Theodor W. Adorno. In the first section, I show how and why Adorno repeatedly criticizes a certain brand of coldness, namely, ‘bourgeois coldness’, which is understood as enacting and encouraging formal abstraction and indifference to sensuous particularity. In this sense, coldness is seen to function as a precondition for severe forms of violence (both symbolic and material). However, in the second (...)
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  26. Bruce Gilbert (2013). The Vitality of Contradiction: Hegel, Politics, and the Dialectic of Liberal-Capitalism. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In The Vitality of Contradiction, Bruce Gilbert provides an exposition of Hegel's political philosophy to establish not only that societies fail because of their contradictions, but also how the unsurpassable oppositions of social life cultivate freedom. He moves beyond Hegel's works to consider the limits of liberal-capitalism and the contemporary social movements around the world that stretch us beyond the global economic system. Drawing on key Hegel texts such as Phenomenology of Spirit and the Philosophy of Right, Gilbert (...)
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  27. Bruce Gilbert (2013). The Vitality of Contradiction: Hegel, Politics, and the Dialectic of Liberal-Capitalism. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In The Vitality of Contradiction, Bruce Gilbert provides an exposition of Hegel's political philosophy to establish not only that societies fail because of their contradictions, but also how the unsurpassable oppositions of social life cultivate freedom. He moves beyond Hegel's works to consider the limits of liberal-capitalism and the contemporary social movements around the world that stretch us beyond the global economic system. Drawing on key Hegel texts such as Phenomenology of Spirit and the Philosophy of Right, Gilbert (...)
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  28.  2
    Kelly Oliver (2015). Witnessing, Recognition, and Response Ethics. Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (4):473-493.
    For at least the last twenty years, philosophers have attempted various strategies for reviving the Hegelian notion of recognition and redeploying it in discourses centered around social justice, including multiculturalism, feminism, race theory, and queer theory. Hegel’s master-slave dialectic may seem like an obvious place to start to analyze the oppression of one group by another. Given that Hegel is not literally talking about slaves, however, but a stage of consciousness, indeed the onset of self-consciousness, we might (...)
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  29.  3
    Michaela Keck (2015). Culture-Crossing in Madison Smartt Bell’s Haitian Trilogy and Neo-Captivity Narrative. Cultura 12 (1):115-128.
    This article investigates Madison Smartt Bell’s Haitian trilogy as a neocaptivity narrative that combines in new ways the conventions of the slave narrative and the Barbary captivity narrative. Furthermore, it examines the culture-crossing of the character of Doctor Hébert in the course of the successful slave uprising of Saint Domingue. Captivity, I argue, constitutes the central theme and structuring device and also triggers Hébert’s culture-crossing in a reversed Hegelian master-slave dialectic that needs to be read together with Riau’s (...)
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  30. Susan Buck-Morss (2009). Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Susan Buck-Morss draws new connections between history, inequality, social conflict, and human emancipation. _Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History_ offers a fundamental reinterpretation of Hegel's master-slave dialectic and points to a way forward to free critical theoretical practice from the prison-house of its own debates. Historicizing the thought of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and the actions taken in the Haitian Revolution, Buck-Morss examines the startling connections between the two and challenges us to widen the (...)
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  31. Andrew Cole (2014). The Birth of Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    Modern theory needs a history lesson. Neither Marx nor Nietzsche first gave us theory—Hegel did. To support this contention, Andrew Cole’s _The Birth of Theory_ presents a refreshingly clear and lively account of the origins and legacy of Hegel’s dialectic as theory. Cole explains how Hegel boldly broke from modern philosophy when he adopted medieval dialectical habits of thought to fashion his own dialectic. While his contemporaries rejected premodern dialectic as outdated dogma, Hegel embraced both (...)
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  32. Molly Macdonald (2014). Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit". Routledge.
    Both Hegel's philosophy and psychoanalytic theory have profoundly influenced contemporary thought, but they are traditionally seen to work in separate rather than intersecting universes. This book offers a new interpretation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and brings it into conversation the work of two of the best-known contemporary psychoanalysts, Christopher Bollas and André Green. Hegel and Psychoanalysis centers a consideration of the Phenomenology on the figure of the Unhappy Consciousness and the concept of Force, two areas that are often overlooked (...)
     
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  33. Molly Macdonald (2013). Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit". Routledge.
    Both Hegel's philosophy and psychoanalytic theory have profoundly influenced contemporary thought, but they are traditionally seen to work in separate rather than intersecting universes. This book offers a new interpretation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and brings it into conversation the work of two of the best-known contemporary psychoanalysts, Christopher Bollas and André Green. Hegel and Psychoanalysis centers a consideration of the Phenomenology on the figure of the Unhappy Consciousness and the concept of Force, two areas that are often overlooked (...)
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  34.  8
    Desh Raj Sirswal, Identity Crises: Religious Identity, Identity Politics and Social Justice.
    Identity is a concept that evolves over the course of life. Identity develops over time and can evolve, sometimes drastically; depending on what directions we take in our life. In the age of globalization, a human being is more aware than old times regarding his community, social and national affairs. A person who identifies himself as part of a particular political party, of a particular faith, and who sees himself as upper-middle class, might discover that in later age, he's (...)
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  35.  30
    Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  36.  4
    Ivana Spasic (2005). Politics and Everyday Life in Serbia in 2005: Views of Politics, Change of Social System, the Public Sphere. Filozofija I Društvo 27:45-74.
    The paper offers an analysis of the interview data collected in the project "Politics and everyday life: Three years later" in terms of three main topics: attitudes to the political sphere, change of social system, and the democratic public sphere. The analysis focuses on ambivalences expressed in the responses which, under the surface of overall disappointment and discontent, may contain preserved results of the previously achieved "social learning" and their positive potentials. The main objective was to examine (...)
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  37.  18
    Lisa Guenther (2012). Fecundity and Natal Alienation: Rethinking Kinship with Emmanuel Levinas and Orlando Patterson. Levinas Studies 7 (1):1-19.
    In his 1934 essay, “Reflections on the Philosophy of Hitlerism,” Levinas raises important questions about the subject’s relation to nature and to history. His account of the ethical significance of paternity, maternity, and fraternity in texts such as Totality and Infinity and Otherwise Than Being suggest powerful new ways to understand the meaning of kinship, beyond the abstractions of Western liberalism. How does this analysis of race and kinship translate into the context of the Transatlantic slave trade, which not only (...)
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  38.  28
    Seehwa Cho (2010). Politics of Critical Pedagogy and New Social Movements. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (3):310-325.
    The proponents of critical pedagogy criticize the earlier Neo‐Marxist theories of education, arguing that they provide only a ‘language of critique’. By introducing the possibility of human agency and resistance, critical pedagogists attempt to develop not only a pedagogy of critique, but also to build a pedagogy of hope. Fundamentally, the aim of critical pedagogy is twofold: 1) to correct the pessimistic conclusions of Neo‐Marxist theories, and 2) to transform a ‘language of critique’ into a ‘language of possibility’ . Then, (...)
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  39.  12
    Ullrich Melle (2007). Introduction. Ethical Perspectives 14 (4):361-370.
    IntroductionIn May 2006, the small group of doctoral students working on ecophilosophy at the Higher Institute of Philosophy at K.U.Leuven invited the Dutch environmental philosopher Martin Drenthen to a workshop to discuss his writings on the concept of wilderness, its metaphysical and moral meaning, and the challenge social constructivism poses for ecophilosophy and environmental protection. Drenthen’s publications on these topics had already been the subject of intense discussions in the months preceding the workshop. His presentation on the workshop and (...)
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  40. David West (2013). Social Movements in Global Politics. Polity.
    In the face of impending global crises and stubborn conflicts, a conventional view of politics risks leaving us confused and fatalistic, feeling powerless because we are unaware of all that can be achieved by political means. By contrast, a variety of recent social movements, ranging from those of women, gays and lesbians and anti-racists, to environmentalists, the Occupy movement and the Arab Spring, demonstrate the enormous potential of political action beyond the institutional sphere of politics. At the (...)
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  41. Claude Gandelman & Itshaq Klein (1978). Hegel's Dialetic of Master and Slave as a Model for the Relation Between Artistic Creation and Aesthetic Appreciation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (1):36-45.
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  42. Chris Rocco (1995). The Politics of Critical Theory: Argument, Structure, Critique in Dialectic of Enlightenment. Philosophy and Social Criticism 21 (2):107-133.
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  43. Ivan Svitak (1978). The Dialectic of Common Sense: The Master Thinkers. Upa.
    Originally published in Czechoslovakia just prior to Prague Spring in 1968, this collection of three essays on the political and philosophical thought of Montaigne, Voltaire, and Holbach examines the relationships between social life and ideological categories, and economics and the development of ideas.
     
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  44.  7
    Eduardo Manuel Duarte (1999). Conscientizacion y Comunidad: A Dialectical Description of Education as the Struggle for Freedom. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (6):389-403.
    This paper contributes to those analyses that have discussed Hegel'sinfluence on Freire, and Freire's rethinking of Hegel. Yet, my narrative of the dialectic of conscientizacion, which I presenthere, is a novel attempt to read both thinkers simultaneously.Thus, in this paper I am exploring, and not didactically proving Gadotti's (1994) important, yet unqualified,claim that Hegel's dialectic ``can be considered the principaltheoretical framework of (Freire's) Pedagogy of the Oppressed.It could be said that the whole of his theory of conscientization has (...)
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  45.  6
    Andrew Lawson (2011). William Faulkner: An Economy of Complex Words. Historical Materialism 19 (2):137-143.
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  46. Marjorie Reeves (ed.) (1999). Christian Thinking and Social Order: Conviction Politics From the 1930s to the Present Day. Cassell.
     
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  47. Sean Sheeter (1982). On Law and Lawlessism. Process Press.
     
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  48. Carol C. Gould (2015). Rethinking Democracy:Freedom and Social Co-Operation in Politics, Economy, and Society. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Carol Gould offers a fundamental reconsideration of the theory of democracy, arguing that democratic decision-making should apply not only to politics but also to economic and social life. Professor Gould redefines traditional concepts of freedom and social equality, and proposes a principle of Equal Positive Freedom in which individual freedom and social co-operation are seen to be compatible. Reformulating basic conceptions of property, authority, economic justice and human rights, the author suggests a number (...)
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  49. Michael Root (1993). Philosophy of Social Science: The Methods, Ideals, and Politics of Social Inquiry. Blackwell.
    This book is a critical introduction to the philosophy of social science. While most social scientists maintain that the social sciences should stand free of politics, this book argues that they should be politically partisan. Root offers a clear description and provocative criticism of many of the methods and ideals that guide research and teaching in the social sciences.
     
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  50.  21
    Graham Riches (1999). Advancing the Human Right to Food in Canada: Social Policy and the Politics of Hunger, Welfare, and Food Security. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):203-211.
    This article argues that hunger in Canada, while being an outcome of unemployment, low incomes, and inadequate welfare, springs also from the failure to recognize and implement the human right to food. Food security has, however, largely been ignored by progressive social policy analysis. Barriers standing in the way of achieving food security include the increasing commodification of welfare and the corporatization of food, the depoliticization of hunger by governments and the voluntary sector, and, most particularly, the neglect by (...)
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