Search results for 'Social policy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Social Policy (1999). Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy. Economics and Philosophy 15:187-208.score: 1140.0
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  2. Graham Riches (1999). Advancing the Human Right to Food in Canada: Social Policy and the Politics of Hunger, Welfare, and Food Security. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):203-211.score: 180.0
    This article argues that hunger in Canada, while being an outcome of unemployment, low incomes, and inadequate welfare, springs also from the failure to recognize and implement the human right to food. Food security has, however, largely been ignored by progressive social policy analysis. Barriers standing in the way of achieving food security include the increasing commodification of welfare and the corporatization of food, the depoliticization of hunger by governments and the voluntary sector, and, most particularly, the neglect (...)
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  3. Bernard Bosanquet (2003). Essays in Philosophy and Social Policy, 1883-1922. Thoemmes Press.score: 180.0
    As one of the leading figures of the idealist movement, Bernard Bosanquet (1848-1923) made major contributions to philosophy and had a significant role in the formation of British social policy. This set contains previously uncollected articles and essays that were first published in little known journals or magazines. Each volume includes new introductions and primary and secondary bibliographies.
     
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  4. Nel Noddings (2002). Caring, Social Policy, and Homelessness. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):441-454.score: 150.0
    Care theory offers a way to overcome a weaknessof liberalism – its reluctance to intervene inthe private lives of adults. In caring for thehomeless, we must sometimes use a limited formof coercion, but our intervention is alwaysinteractive, and the process of finding asolution is one of negotiation between theneeds expressed by the homeless and the needswe infer for them.
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  5. Otgontsetseg Erhemjamts, Qian Li & Anand Venkateswaran (2013). Corporate Social Responsibility and Its Impact on Firms' Investment Policy, Organizational Structure, and Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):395-412.score: 144.0
    This study examines the determinants of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its implications on firms’ investment policy, organizational strategy, and performance. First, we find that firms with better performance, higher R&D intensity, better financial health, and firms in new economy industries are more likely to engage in CSR activities, while riskier firms are less likely to do so. We also find U-shaped relation between firm size and CSR, indicating that either very small or very large firms exhibit high (...)
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  6. Randy Lane Johner (2013). Review of From Transmitted Deprivation to Social Exclusion: Policy, Poverty and Parenting. [REVIEW] Studies in Social Justice 7 (2):315-317.score: 138.0
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  7. Nathalie Burnay (2010). Older Workers in Changing Social Policy Patterns. Studies in Social Justice 3 (2):155-171.score: 134.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE Compared to other European countries, the employment rate of older workers in Belgium is rather low. This paper argues that one of the most relevant factors underlying the problems of this low employment rate in Belgium is the social policies directed at older workers. Indeed, when unemployment became a widespread phenomenon in the1970s and 80s, early-retirement schemes were designed to alleviate the financial implications on an aging workforce. The government encouraged anyone (...)
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  8. Elmar Rieger (2013). The Logic of Welfare: Religious and Sociological Foundations of Social Policy Rationality. International Journal of Social Quality 3 (2):125-144.score: 126.0
    The article aims to contribute to the sociological theory of the welfare state by addressing a fundamental puzzle of social policy, namely, the weakness of its claim to be a rational effort of society dealing with problems of social integration. Drawing on the work of Franz-Xaver Kaufmann, I distinguish between the cultural or ideational side of the welfare state and the social engineering or outcome side, arguing to take the rhetoric and symbolism of social (...) more seriously. The integration of society is more due to the communicative action of social policy than to its organizational quality. As early as the axial age civilizations, symbolism and ideology emerged as an autonomous field of social conflict and societal union. Taking ancient Israel as an example, I argue that societal integration may take place even in the absence of strong institutional correlates of social politics. This can help to explain why the welfare state in modern society is compatible with ever-increasing economic and social inequality. (shrink)
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  9. Franz-Xaver Kaufmann (2013). The Idea of Social Policy in Western Societies: Origins and Diversity. International Journal of Social Quality 3 (2):16-40.score: 126.0
    Today, "social policy" is an expression used across the globe to denote a broad range of issues, such as old age security, health, housing and so on. But historically, "social policy" had a distinct European origin and a distinct meaning. I maintain that "social policy" and the "welfare state" are more than a list of social services, and also have strong socio-cultural underpinnings that account for the diversity of social policy. The (...)
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  10. Michelle M. Martel (2009). The Ethics of Psychology's Role in Politics and the Development and Institution of Social Policy. Ethics and Behavior 19 (2):103 – 111.score: 120.0
    The relationship between psychological research and the development of social policy is controversial, as is any discussion of the role of values and morals within science. Three particular instances of this controversy are evident in psychological research conducted on affirmative action, child abuse, and abortion. The American Psychological Association (APA) in fact takes a particular organizational stance on these issues. APA's Ethics Code provides some guidelines for dealing with issues of personal values as they impact psychological research and (...)
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  11. Cornelius B. Pratt (1991). Multinational Corporate Social Policy Process for Ethical Responsibility in Sub-Saharan Africa. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (7):527 - 541.score: 120.0
    The article identifies the challenges that multinational corporations (MNCs) from the developed world face in sub-Saharan Africa and examines the direct foreign-investment and development interests of the region. In light of these challenges and interests, it also explores answers to the question What is to be done?The occurrence of MNCs' operations in culturally pluralistic societies suggest that they use, as the basis for a corporation-formulated regional code of conduct, a value-based corporate social policy process. That process should embody (...)
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  12. Joseph Wronka (1994). Human Rights and Social Policy in the United States: An Educational Agenda for the 21st Century. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):261-272.score: 120.0
    Abstract Education in the human rights arena has tended to emphasise, at least in the United States, civil and political rights. Into the next century, this moral educational agenda should be expanded to include more emphasis upon economic, social, and solidarity rights and the notion of the interdependency of human rights, the official position of the UN Human Rights Commission. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, reaffirmed at the recent World Conference on Human Rights, is the authoritative definition of (...)
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  13. Margaret Beattie (1983). Women, Unions, and Social Policy. Journal of Business Ethics 2 (3):227 - 231.score: 120.0
    We contend in this paper that the trade union role in social policy is expanding due to the debate on women's issues. The Centrale de l'enseignement du Québec is seen as a forerunner of this trend, with its policy positions on questions previously seen as personal. The method of promotion of these interests is also new, with caucusing and networking. The significance of these changes goes beyond unionized women workers and affects all women.
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  14. Werner Bonefeld (2013). Human Economy and Social Policy On Ordo-Liberalism and Political Authority. History of the Human Sciences 26 (2):106-125.score: 120.0
    The article expounds the ordo-liberal tradition that emerged as a distinct neo-liberal conceptualization of free economy as a political practice. According to this tradition there are things more important than GDP in as much as free economy depends on the formation of the moral and the social preconditions of market freedom. The social facilitation and moral embedding of free economy are fundamental to the ordo-liberal conception of a human economy, which entails a social policy of Vitalpolitik (...)
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  15. Frank H. Cassell (1983). Reflections on Management Style and Corporate Social Policy. Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):123 - 126.score: 120.0
    Corporate social policy can be viewed as three legs of a tripod: efficient production, stable employment, and a social and political environment that promotes high performance of both workers and managers.Social policy process consists of achieving a balance of corporate interest with other interests in the society. Each policy position taken by the firm alters its relationships with all other interests and creates a new balance. This entails the risk of creating unfriendly interests and (...)
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  16. Chairperson Feliciana Rajevska (1996). Latvia in Search of a Social Policy Model. The European Legacy 1 (2):652-658.score: 120.0
    (1996). Latvia in search of a social policy model. The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 652-658.
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  17. John Walsh (2013). Social Policy and Special Economic Zones in the Greater Mekong Subregion. International Journal of Social Quality 3 (1):44-56.score: 120.0
    One of the principal means by which state management of rapid economic development has been attempted in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) has been the creation and maintenance of special economic zones (SEZs). The purpose of SEZs is to encourage domestic and international investment in specific areas to promote mainly export-oriented manufacturing. They have been created in large numbers in Thailand, Vietnam and the Yunnan Province of China, and they are being built across Cambodia, Laos and now Myanmar. Negative effects, (...)
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  18. Brian T. Trainor (2001). Social Work, Social Policy, and Truth. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):239-254.score: 120.0
    In this article, I wish to suggest that the relationship of social work and social policy to “Truth” is of crucial importance for sound professional practice, and I attempt to substantiate this claim by analyzing and highlighting the very harmful consequences of ignoring, dismissing or distorting this relationship. I will show that these very definite and deleterious consequences inevitably arise as soon as Foucauldian postmodernists attempt to cut the link between professional practice in social work and (...)
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  19. Andrew Stables (2006). From Semiosis to Social Policy. Sign Systems Studies 34 (1):121-133.score: 120.0
    The argument moves through three stages. In the first, the case is made for accepting ‘living is semiotic engagement’ as ‘a foundational statement for a postfoundational age’. This requires a thoroughgoing rejection of mind-body substance dualism, and a problematisation of humanism. In the second, the hazardous endeavour of applying the above perspective to social policy begins with a consideration of the sine qua non(s) underpinning such an application. These are posited as unpredictability of outcomes and blurring of the (...)
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  20. Lawrence M. Mead (1997). Citizenship and Social Policy: T. H. Marshall and Poverty. Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (02):197-.score: 114.0
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  21. Theda Skocpol (1997). The G.I. Bill and U.S. Social Policy, Past and Future. Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (02):95-.score: 114.0
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  22. Ian Davies (2009). Latino Immigration and Social Change in the United States: Toward an Ethical Immigration Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):377 - 391.score: 108.0
    Approximately 47 million Latinos currently live in the United States, and nearly 25 percent of them are undocumented. The USA is a very different country from just a generation ago – culturally, socially, and demographically. Its presumed core values have been transformed largely by the changes wrought by immigration and ethnicity. A multicultural society has, in 2008, elected a multicultural president. This article examines immigration discourse, framed in terms of fear and security, and the evolution of the US immigration (...). Latino immigration is presented as a force that has shaped the nation's past and continues to shape the economic, demographic, and cultural future of the United States. Psychological barriers to the social integration of immigrants are also explored. This article concludes that government policy makers should encourage a more tolerant, multicultural society by integrating Latino immigrants into the social, economic, and political fabric of the nation. (shrink)
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  23. Thaddeus R. Miller & Mark W. Neff (2013). De-Facto Science Policy in the Making: How Scientists Shape Science Policy and Why It Matters (or, Why STS and STP Scholars Should Socialize). Minerva 51 (3):295-315.score: 108.0
    Science and technology (S&T) policy studies has explored the relationship between the structure of scientific research and the attainment of desired outcomes. Due to the difficulty of measuring them directly, S&T policy scholars have traditionally equated “outcomes” with several proxies for evaluation, including economic impact, and academic output such as papers published and citations received. More recently, scholars have evaluated science policies through the lens of Public Value Mapping, which assesses scientific programs against societal values. Missing from these (...)
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  24. Erik Weber (2007). Social Mechanisms, Causal Inference, and the Policy Relevance of Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (3):348-359.score: 108.0
    The paper has two aims. First, to show that we need social mechanisms to establish the policy relevance of causal claims, even if it is possible to build a good argument for those claims without knowledge of mechanisms. Second, to show that although social scientists can, in principle, do without social mechanisms when they argue for causal claims, in reality scientific practice contexts where they do not need mechanisms are very rare. Key Words: social mechanisms (...)
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  25. Alexander Rosenberg (2000). Darwinism in Philosophy, Social Science, and Policy. Cambridge University Press.score: 108.0
    A collection of essays by Alexander Rosenberg, the distinguished philosopher of science. The essays cover three broad areas related to Darwinian thought and naturalism: the first deals with the solution of philosophical problems such as reductionism, the second with the development of social theories, and the third with the intersection of evolutionary biology with economics, political philosophy, and public policy. Specific papers deal with naturalistic epistemology, the limits of reductionism, the biological justification of ethics, the so-called 'trolley problem' (...)
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  26. Fiona MacPhail & Paul Bowles (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility as Support for Employee Volunteers: Impacts, Gender Puzzles and Policy Implications in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):405 - 416.score: 108.0
    In this article, we examine an important but relatively under-researched form of corporate social responsibility, namely, employer support for employee voluntary activity. Using Canadian data, we examine two questions. First, we analyze the impacts of employer support on the total number of hours volunteered and on the voluntary activities which are undertaken. Second, we examine how employer support is distributed between male and female employees. Our results indicate that employer support is associated with a greater amount of volunteer activity (...)
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  27. Gary Craig (2007). Social Justice in a Multicultural Society: Experience From the UK. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):93-108.score: 108.0
    Social justice is a contested concept. For example, some on the left argue for equality of outcomes, those on the right for equality of opportunities, and there are differing emphases on the roles of state, market and individual in achieving a socially just society. These differences in emphasis are critical when it comes to examining the impact that public policy has on minority ethnic groups. Social justice should not be culture-blind any more than it can be gender-blind (...)
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  28. Professor Sheila Jasanoff (1996). Is Science Socially Constructed—And Can It Still Inform Public Policy? Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):263-276.score: 108.0
    This paper addresses, and seeks to correct, some frequent misunderstandings concerning the claim that science is socially constructed. It describes several features of scientific inquiry that have been usefully illuminated by constructivist studies of science, including the mundane or tacit skills involved in research, the social relationships in scientific laboratories, the causes of scientific controversy, and the interconnection of science and culture. Social construction, the paper argues, should be seen not as an alternative to but an enhancement of (...)
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  29. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 108.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects is (...)
     
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  30. Craig Waddell (1994). Rhetoric of Environmental Policy: From Critical Practice to the Social Construction of Theory. Social Epistemology 8 (3):289 – 310.score: 102.0
    (1994). Rhetoric of environmental policy: From critical practice to the social construction of theory. Social Epistemology: Vol. 8, Public Indifference to Population Issues, pp. 289-310.
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  31. Lisa Smyth (2012). The Social Politics of Breastfeeding: Norms, Situations and Policy Implications. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):182-194.score: 102.0
    This paper explores the social and emotional consequences of three major assumptions about human action underpinning breastfeeding promotion campaigns in the UK. Drawing on Joas's critique of instrumental accounts of rational action, the paper illustrates the ways in which these campaigns firstly contribute to the moralisation of motherhood; secondly value highly individualised, de-contextualised forms of action; and thirdly promote an objectified view of the human body as a pliable instrument of human intentions. The consequences of these assumptions, as they (...)
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  32. Wayne Albert Risser Leys (1941). Ethics and Social Policy. New York, Prentice-Hall, Inc..score: 102.0
    NO PART OF THIS BOOK MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM, BY MIMEO GRAPH OR ANY OTHER MEANS, WITHOUT PERMIS SION IN WRITING FROM THE PUBLISHERS.
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  33. Elizabeth Shove (2012). The Dynamics of Social Practice: Everyday Life and How It Changes. Sage Publications.score: 102.0
    The Dynamics of Social Practice -- Introducing Theories of Practice -- Materials and Resources -- Sequence and Structure -- Making and Breaking Links -- Material, Competence and Meaning -- Car-Driving: Elements and Linkages Making Links -- Breaking Links -- Elements Between Practices -- Standardization and Diversity -- Individual and Collective Careers -- The Life of Elements -- Modes of Circulation -- Transportation and Access: Material -- Abstraction, Reversal and Migration: Competence -- Association and Classification: Meaning -- Packing and Unpacking (...)
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  34. John C. Bennett (1946). Christian Ethics and Social Policy. New York, C. Scribner's Sons.score: 102.0
     
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  35. Richard Machalek (1995). Sociobiology, Sociopathy, and Social Policy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):564-564.score: 102.0
    Evolutionary analysis suggests that policies based on deterrence may cope effectively with primary sociopathy if the threat of punishment fits the crime in the cost/benefit calculus of the sociopath, not that of the public. On the other hand, policies designed to offset serious disadvantage in social competition may help inhibit the development of secondary sociopathy, rather than deter its expression.
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  36. A. Mani (1993). Analysis of a Social Policy Measure in Brunei Darussalam: The Case of Kempen Bersopan Santun. Educational Technology Centre, Universiti Brunei Darussalam.score: 102.0
     
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  37. Allen Buchanan (2009). Philosophy and Public Policy: A Role for Social Moral Epistemology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):276-290.score: 96.0
    abstract Part 1 of this essay argues that one of the most important contributions of philosophers to sound public policy may be to combat the influence of bad Philosophy (which includes, but is not limited to, bad Philosophy produced by accredited academic philosophers). Part 2 argues that the conventional conception of Practical Ethics (CPE) that philosophers bring to issues of public policy is defective because it fails to take seriously the phenomenon of the subversion of morality, the role (...)
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  38. Daniel B. Klein & Charlotta Stern (2005). Professors and Their Politics: The Policy Views of Social Scientists. Critical Review 17 (3-4):257-303.score: 96.0
    Abstract Academic social scientists overwhelmingly vote Democratic, and the Democratic hegemony has increased significantly since 1970. Moreover, the policy preferences of a large sample of the members of the scholarly associations in anthropology, economics, history, legal and political philosophy, political science, and sociology generally bear out conjectures about the correspondence of partisan identification with left/right ideal types; although across the board, both Democratic and Republican academics favor government action more than the ideal types might suggest. Variations in (...) views among Democrats is smaller than among Republicans. Ideological diversity (as judged not only by voting behavior, but by policy views) is by far the greatest within economics. Social scientists who deviate from left?wing views are as likely to be libertarian as conservative. (shrink)
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  39. Corinna Jung (2009). Towards More Confidence: About the Roles of Social Scientists in Participatory Policy Making. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):125-129.score: 96.0
    From June 26 to 27, the workshop Ironists, Reformers, or Rebels? The Role of the Social Sciences in Participatory Policy Making took place at the Collegium Helveticum of the UZH/ETH in Zurich. The organisers’ motivation was the apparently missing involvement of social scientists in public engagement processes. This impression persists because, while social scientists often observe public debates or develop participatory methods for public policy-making, they rarely take part in those processes themselves. A closer look (...)
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  40. J. Bryan Hehir (1992). Policy Arguments in a Public Church: Catholic Social Ethics and Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (3):347-364.score: 96.0
    This paper is an analysis of the relationship of social ethics and bioethics in Roman Catholic theology. The argument of the paper is that the character of both Catholic moral theology and ecclesiology shape the broadly defined interest of the church in bioethics. The paper examines the common elements of social ethics and bioethics in Catholic teaching, describes how ecclesiology shapes Catholic public policy and uses the examples of abortion and health care to illustrate the relationship of (...)
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  41. Gerald A. Cory (2002). Maclean's Evolutionary Neuroscience, the Csn Model and Hamilton's Rule: Some Developmental, Clinical, and Social Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (1):151-181.score: 96.0
    Paul MacLean, founder and long-time chief ofthe Laboratory of Brain Evolution and Behavior,National Institutes of Health, is a pioneeringfigure in the emergent field of evolutionaryneuroscience. His influence has been widelyfelt in the development of biologicalpsychiatry and has led to a considerableliterature on evolutionary approaches toclinical issues. MacLean's work is alsoenjoying a resurgence of interest in academicareas of neuroscience and evolutionarypsychology which have previously shown littleinterest or knowledge of his extensive work. This chapter builds on MacLean's work to bringtogether new insights (...)
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  42. Even Nilssen & Nanna Kildal (2009). New Contractualism in Social Policy and the Norwegian Fight Against Poverty and Social Exclusion. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):303-321.score: 96.0
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  43. James P. Sterba (1981). The Welfare Rights of Distant Peoples and Future Generations: Moral Side Constraints on Social Policy. Social Theory and Practice 7 (1):99-119.score: 96.0
  44. Christian Byk (1992). The Human Genome Project and the Social Contract: A Law Policy Approach. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):371-380.score: 96.0
    For the first time in history, genetics will enable science to completely identify each human as genetically unique. Will this knowledge reinforce the trend for more individual liberties or will it create a ‘brave new world’? A law policy approach to the problems raised by the human genome project shows how far our democratic institutions are from being the proper forum to discuss such issues. Because of the fears and anxiety raised in the population, and also because of its (...)
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  45. Maryann Ayim & Barbara Houston (1985). The Epistemology of Gender Identity: Implications for Social Policy. Social Theory and Practice 11 (1):25-59.score: 96.0
  46. Runa Sarkar (2007). Policy Approaches to Induce Corporate Social Responsibility in Public and Private-Sector Firms in Developing Countries. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:231-252.score: 96.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) concerns the realm of business behavior in which the firm tries to effectively manage its business and non-market environment interface. Coerced CSR refers to taking socially responsible action in response to or in anticipation of retaliation in some form (boycott, adverse publicity, introduction of regulatory laws, etc.) from interest groups who are not directly part of the market to which the firm caters. In contrast, strategic CSR or altruistic CSR refers to socially responsible activities undertaken (...)
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  47. Lisa Cacari-Stone & Magdalena Avila (2012). Rethinking Research Ethics for Latinos: The Policy Paradox of Health Reform and the Role of Social Justice. Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):445-460.score: 96.0
    This article discusses the paradox of exclusion/inclusion: U.S. health policy prohibits Latinos who fall under certain classifications from accessing health services and insurance yet permits them to be ?human subjects? in health research. We aim to advance the discussion of health research ethics post the Tuskegee syphilis experiment in Latinos by (a) tracing the impacts of policy exclusion and the social context of anti-Latino sentiment on Latinos' low participation rates in health research and inequitable access to treatment (...)
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  48. Salvatore Pitruzzello (forthcoming). Social Policy and the Implementation of the Maastricht Fiscal Convergence Criteria: The Italian and French Attempts at Welfare and Pension Reforms. Social Research.score: 96.0
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  49. A. Donchin (1996). Feminist Critiques of New Fertility Technologies: Implications for Social Policy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (5):475-498.score: 96.0
    This essay aims to show how feminist theoretical and practical perspectives have enriched and deepened debate about moral and social issues generated by the proliferation and commodification of new reproductive techniques. It evaluates alternative feminist appraisals beginning with the first group to organize a collective response to the medicalization of infertility and explores several weaknesses working within their assessment: objectification of infertile women, naturalizing constructions of motherhood, hostility to technology, and an overly simplistic conception of power relations. Next, it (...)
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  50. Margaret Levi & Sara Singleton (forthcoming). Women in" The Working Man's Paradise": Sole Parents, the Women's Movement, and the Social Policy Bargain in Australia. Social Research.score: 96.0
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