Search results for 'Social responsibility of business' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ariane Berthoin Antal, Maria Oppen & André Sobczak (2009). (Re)Discovering the Social Responsibility of Business in Germany. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):285 - 301.score: 1500.0
    The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a relatively recent addition to the agenda in Germany, although the country has a long history of companies practicing social responsibilities. The expectations of society had remained stable for many years, encapsulated in laws, societal norms, and industrial relations agreements. But the past decade has seen significant changes in Germany, challenging established ways of treating the role of business in society. This contribution reviews and illustrates the development of (...)
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  2. Jan Lepoutre & Aimé Heene (2006). Investigating the Impact of Firm Size on Small Business Social Responsibility: A Critical Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):257 - 273.score: 1470.0
    The impact of smaller firm size on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is ambiguous. Some contend that small businesses are socially responsible by nature, while others argue that a smaller firm size imposes barriers on small firms that constrain their ability to take responsible action. This paper critically analyses recent theoretical and empirical contributions on the size–social responsibility relationship among small businesses. More specifically, it reviews the impact of firm size on four antecedents of business behaviour: (...)
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  3. Stefan Tengblad & Claes Ohlsson (2010). The Framing of Corporate Social Responsibility and the Globalization of National Business Systems: A Longitudinal Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):653 - 669.score: 1470.0
    The globalization movement in recent decades has meant rapid growth in trade, financial transactions, and cross-country ownership of economic assets. In this article, we examine how the globalization of national business systems has influenced the framing of corporate social responsibility (CSR). This is done using text analysis of CEO letters appearing in the annual reports of 15 major corporations in Sweden during a period of transformational change. The results show that the discourse about CSR in the annual (...)
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  4. Mary Lyn Stoll (2008). Backlash Hits Business Ethics: Finding Effective Strategies for Communicating the Importance of Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):17 - 24.score: 1470.0
    Recently, several articles have asserted that corporate social responsibility programs have gone too far and need to be reigned in. These critics have charged that corporate social responsibility is to be regarded with skepticism and that any changes in corporate accountability should be superficial at best. I will examine a␣number of these objections; I conclude that these critiques are largely ill founded, but that their increasing frequency in popular media is a cause for concern. I argue (...)
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  5. Nelarine Cornelius, James Wallace & Rana Tassabehji (2007). An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Identity and Ethics Teaching in Business Schools. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):117 - 135.score: 1410.0
    Recent events have raised concerns about the ethical standards of public and private organisations, with some attention falling on business schools as providers of education and training to managers and senior executives. This paper investigates the nature of, motivation and commitment to, ethics tuition provided by the business schools. Using content analysis of their institutional and home websites, we appraise their corporate identity, level of engagement in socially responsible programmes, degree of social inclusion, and the relationship to (...)
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  6. Luc Fransen (2013). The Embeddedness of Responsible Business Practice: Exploring the Interaction Between National-Institutional Environments and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):213-227.score: 1386.0
    Academic literature recognizes that firms in different countries deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in different ways. Because of this, analysts presume that variations in national-institutional arrangements affect CSR practices. Literature, however, lacks specificity in determining, first, what parts of national political-economic configurations actually affect CSR practices; second, the precise aspects of CSR affected by national-institutional variables; third, how causal mechanisms between national-institutional framework variables and aspects of CSR practices work. Because of this the literature is not able (...)
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  7. Bill Shaw (1988). A Reply to Thomas Mulligan's “Critique of Milton Friedman's Essay 'the Social Responsibility of Business to Increase its Profits'”. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (7):537 - 543.score: 1278.0
    Professor Thomas Mulligan undertakes to discredit Milton Friedman's thesis that The Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits. He attempts to do this by moving from Friedman's paradigm characterizing a socially responsible executive as willful and disloyal to a different paradigm, i.e., one emphasizing the consultative and consensus-building role of a socially responsible executive. Mulligan's critique misses the point, first, because even consensus-building executives act contrary to the will of minority shareholders, but even more importantly, (...)
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  8. Thomas Mulligan (1986). A Critique of Milton Friedman's Essay 'the Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits'. Journal of Business Ethics 5 (4):265 - 269.score: 1275.0
    The main arguments of Milton Friedman's famous and influential essay are unsuccessful: He fails to prove that the exercise of social responsibility in business is by nature an unfair and socialist practice.Much of Friedman's case is based on a questionable paradigm; a key premise is false; and logical cogency is sometimes missing.
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  9. Peter Arlow (1991). Personal Characteristics in College Students' Evaluations of Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (1):63 - 69.score: 1245.0
    A survey of 138 college students reveals an undergraduate major has a greater influence on corporate social responsibility than business ethics. Business students are no less ethical than nonbusiness students. Females are more ethical and socially responsible than males. Age is negatively related to one's Machiavellian orientation and positively related to negative attitudes about corporate efforts at social responsibility. The results suggest a greater need to focus busines ethics instruction based on student characteristics.
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  10. Brenda E. Joyner & Dinah Payne (2002). Evolution and Implementation: A Study of Values, Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (4):297 - 311.score: 1242.0
    There is growing recognition that good ethics can have a positive economic impact on the performance of firms. Many statistics support the premise that ethics, values, integrity and responsibility are required in the modern workplace. For consumer groups and society at large, research has shown that good ethics is good business. This study defines and traces the emergence and evolution within the business literature of the concepts of values, business ethics and corporate social responsibility (...)
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  11. Delvin D. Hawley (1991). Business Ethics and Social Responsibility in Finance Instruction: An Abdication of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (9):711 - 721.score: 1242.0
    The shareholder wealth maximization objective for corporate management can be a very effective tool for decision making. However, it can also be used to rationalize the commission of unethical or socially irresponsible actions. Overemphasis on the SWM objective by some companies can lead to dangerous or disastrous consequences for consumers, employees, or the general population. Even so, issues of business ethics and social responsibility (BE-SR) are almost totally ignored in corporate finance textbooks. If the typical coverage of (...)
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  12. Karen Paul & Peter Dobkin Hall (1995). The Influence of the JDR 3rd Fund on “Business and Society”: Incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility in the Business Curriculum. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):769 - 779.score: 1242.0
    The ideal of corporate social responsibility as a management orientation and as a field of study in business schools was given support by John D. Rockefeller 3rd (JDR 3). He attempted to promote this concept in the Committee on Economic Development and in certain business schools. This attempt was not very effective in academe, due partly to a lack of understanding about how universities function. As a result, an adequate academic infrastructure was slow to develop.
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  13. Aigul Maidyrova, Baurzhan Esengeldi & Aidana Sariyeva (2009). Social Responsibility of Business in Kazakhstan. International Corporate Responsibility Series 4:261-266.score: 1230.0
    This article studies the possibility of forming social policy, and in particular policies for social security, through the participation of domestic business. By taking on social responsibility, business can eventually, of own its own accord, offer the state and society its assistance in dealing with social problems. In Kazakhstan, a major part of business people see their responsibility as many-sided, consisting of duties to employees, consumers, business partners, the local community, (...)
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  14. Peter deMaCarty (2009). Financial Returns of Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Moral Freedom and Responsibility of Business Leaders. Business and Society Review 114 (3):393-433.score: 1215.0
    A number of theorists have proposed mechanisms suggesting that corporate social responsibility produces better financial results. Others subscribe to the theory that, realistically, less ethical means are necessary. This article contains an analysis of these perspectives drawing on observations from evolutionary game theory and nature. Based on these analyzes, it is concluded that the financial returns of corporate social responsibility and irresponsibility (CSR and CSI) are equal on average. The explanation is that CSR and CSI are (...)
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  15. Manuel Larrán Jorge & Francisco Javier Andrades Peña (2014). Determinants of Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics Education in Spanish Universities. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (2):139-153.score: 1215.0
    The current economic crisis, unsustainable growth, and financial scandals invite reflection on the role of universities in professional training, particularly those who have to manage businesses. This study analyzes the main factors that might determine the extent to which Spanish organizational management educators use corporate social responsibility (CSR) or business ethics stand-alone subjects to equip students with alternative views on business. A web content analysis and non-parametric mean comparison statistics of the curricula of undergraduate degrees in (...)
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  16. Grażyna Bartkowiak (2006). Practical Aspects of a Social Responsibility in Business. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (5-6):133-140.score: 1209.0
    The subject of the article is social responsibility of business and the role of social responsibility in the daily activity of companies as reliable partners in business.The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical one and the empirical one. In the theoretical part the author describes the areas of social responsibility and the examples of socially responsible actions. In the empirical part the author presents the research study carried out in the following (...)
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  17. Heledd Jenkins (2009). A 'Business Opportunity' Model of Corporate Social Responsibility for Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. Business Ethics 18 (1):21-36.score: 1200.0
    In their book 'Corporate Social Opportunity', Grayson and Hodges maintain that 'the driver for business success is entrepreneurialism, a competitive instinct and a willingness to look for innovation from non-traditional areas such as those increasingly found within the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda'. Such opportunities are described as 'commercially viable activities which also advance environmental and social sustainability'. There are three dimensions to corporate social opportunity (CSO) – innovation in products and services, serving unserved (...)
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  18. Terry L. Besser (2012). The Consequences of Social Responsibility for Small Business Owners in Small Towns. Business Ethics 21 (2):129-139.score: 1200.0
    This paper focuses on three under-researched subjects in the corporate social responsibility literature: small businesses, small towns, and consequences of social responsibility for the business owner personally. Small businesses are the vast majority of businesses and make a significant contribution to national economic vitality. Their value to the survival of small towns, where they are often the only businesses, is even more important. Research indicates that the social performance of big and small businesses alike (...)
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  19. Asolo Adeyeye Adewole (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility, Self-Regulation, and the Problems of Unethical Business Practices in Africa. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:69-79.score: 1200.0
    The paper examines the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) against the backdrop of its self-regulatory posture. Using the African experience as a case study, the paper observes that the activities of multinationals show very clearly that they are grossly irresponsible despite their professed self-regulation. Instead, the multinationals have created an image of terror due to their deep-rooted involvements in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, tax evasion, bribery, market manipulation, and other forms of unethical practices, notwithstanding their so-called (...)
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  20. Niklas Egels-Zandén & Evelina Wahlqvist (2007). Post-Partnership Strategies for Defining Corporate Responsibility: The Business Social Compliance Initiative. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):175 - 189.score: 1200.0
    While cross-sectoral partnerships are frequently presented as a way to achieve sustainable development, some corporations that first tried using the strategy are now changing direction. Growing tired of what are, in their eyes, inefficient and unproductive cross-sectoral partnerships, firms are starting to form post-cross-sectoral partnerships (‚post-partnerships’) open exclusively to corporations. This paper examines one such post-partnership project, the Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI), to analyse the possibility of post-partnerships establishing stable definitions of ‚corporate responsibility’. We do this (...)
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  21. Rafik Z. Elias (2004). An Examination of Business Students' Perception of Corporate Social Responsibilities Before and After Bankruptcies. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (3):267-281.score: 1190.0
    Significant research has found that corporations have a social responsibility beyond maximizing shareholders' value. This study examines the effect of high-profile corporate bankruptcies on perception of corporate social responsibility. Undergraduate and graduate business students rated the importance of corporate social responsibility on profitability, long-term success and short-term success, before and after high-profile bankruptcies. The results indicated that students in general perceived corporate social responsibility to be more important to profitability and long-term (...)
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  22. Asolo Adeyeye Adewole (unknown). Corporate Social Responsibility, Self-Regulation, and the Problems of Unethical Business Practices in Africa: A Case for the Establishment of a United Nations Global Business Regulatory Agency. Philosophical Explorations:69-79.score: 1188.0
    The paper examines the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) against the backdrop of its self-regulatory posture. Using the African experience as a case study, the paper observes that the activities of multinationals show very clearly that they are grossly irresponsible despite their professed self-regulation. Instead, the multinationals have created an image of terror due to their deep-rooted involvements in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, tax evasion, bribery, market manipulation, and other forms of unethical practices, notwithstanding their so-called (...)
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  23. Christa Thomsen & Jakob Lauring (2008). Practicing the Business of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Process Perspective. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (2):117-131.score: 1158.0
    The practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has often been described as a balance of profitability and social or societal responsibility by scholars as well as practitioners. It is assumed that regulations and guidelines of CSR practices link competitiveness and responsibility together. While recognising that formal CSR statements represent a goal-oriented managerial approach to CSR, we argue based on the description of a qualitative case study that the relationship between profitability and social or societal (...)
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  24. Da-Chang Pai, Chi-Shiun Lai, Chih-Jen Chiu & Chin-Fang Yang (forthcoming). Corporate Social Responsibility and Brand Advocacy in Business-to-Business Market: The Mediated Moderating Effect of Attribution. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 1152.0
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  25. Richard Nunan (1988). The Libertarian Conception of Corporate Property: A Critique of Milton Friedman's Views on the Social Responsibility of Business. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (12):891 - 906.score: 1144.0
    A critique of Milton Friedman's thesis that corporate executives have a fiduciary responsibility not to pursue socially desirable goals at the expense of profitability. The author argues that even under a libertarian conception of the nature of corporate property, Friedman's thesis does not follow. In particular, an executive's decision to prize "socially responsible behavior" above profit maximization does not necessarily violate the contractual rights of dissenting stockholders. Whether executives have obligations to refrain from such behavior depends entirely on the (...)
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  26. Jiyun Kang & Gwendolyn Hustvedt (2013). Building Trust Between Consumers and Corporations: The Role of Consumer Perceptions of Transparency and Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.score: 1134.0
    Developing trust in a company is a significant part of building the company-consumer relationship. Previous studies have sought to identify the positive consequences of trust such as loyalty and repurchase, but the question of what builds trust remains largely unanswered. To answer the question, we developed a model that depicts the relationships among transparency, social responsibility, trust, attitude, word-of-mouth (WOM) intention, and purchase intention. An online survey was conducted with a US nationwide sample of 303 consumers, and the (...)
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  27. Benjamin Gray (2010). The Rise of Voluntary Work in Higher Education and Corporate Social Responsibility in Business: Perspectives of Students and Graduate Employees. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):95-109.score: 1131.0
    The Higher Education and Employment strand of the Learning for Life project focused on exploring some of the values of 169 students and graduate employees (Arthur et al. 2009a , b ). A major theme suggested by participants, which arose naturally from the data and emerged from people’s accounts during in-depth interviews, involved the close relationship they felt existed between voluntary work and core values. It is this aspect of the project that is reported. There are several important and new (...)
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  28. Michael Gonin (2007). Business Research, Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, and the Inherent Responsibility of Scholars. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):33-58.score: 1123.0
    Business research and teaching institutions play an important role in shaping the way businesses perceive their relations to the broader society and its moral expectations. Hence, as ethical scandals recently arose in the business world, questions related to the civic responsibilities of business scholars and to the role business schools play in society have gained wider interest. In this article, I argue that these ethical shortcomings are at least partly resulting from the mainstream business model (...)
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  29. Ian Worthington, Monder Ram & Trevor Jones (2006). Exploring Corporate Social Responsibility in the U.K. Asian Small Business Community. Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):201 - 217.score: 1106.0
    Within the limited, but growing, literature on small business ethics almost no attention has been paid to the issue of social responsibility within ethnic minority businesses. Using a social capital perspective, this paper reports on an exploratory and qualitative investigation into the attitudinal and behavioural manifestations of CSR within small and medium-sized Asian owned or managed firms in the U.K., with particular reference to the distinctive factors motivating organisational responses. It offers alternative explanations of entrepreneurial behaviour (...)
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  30. Jeanne M. Logsdon & I. I. I. Buren (unknown). National Styles of Corporate Social Responsibility: Exploring Macro Influences on Responsible Business Behavior. Philosophical Explorations:253-268.score: 1104.0
    While the literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR) suggests that its form and content differ at least somewhat from country to country, it has not begun to address whether CSR practices converge or diverge over time as countries benefit from higher levels of economic development, or whether these practices relate to specific cultural values and institutional structures. This paper proposes an initial conceptual model and propositions to begin to assess whether and how the different levels of economic development, (...)
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  31. Jim Wishloff (2009). The Land of Realism and the Shipwreck of Idea-Ism: Thomas Aquinas and Milton Friedman on the Social Responsibilities of Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):137 - 155.score: 1096.0
    The views of thirteenth century Catholic thinker Thomas Aquinas and twentieth century economist Milton Friedman on the social responsibility of business are contrasted by probing the foundations of their positions. The basis of Aquinas' normative stance in political economy is found in the metaphysical and moral realism of the classic tradition. The role Descartes and Hobbes played in overturning this philosophical starting point and ushering in an age of ideology is traced out. Friedman's commitment to Comte's vision (...)
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  32. Craig P. Dunn & Brian K. Burton (2006). Friedman's “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits”. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:292-295.score: 1080.0
    In this paper we examine many of the arguments contained in Milton Friedman’s classic essay, in the form of critiques linked with learning objectives forclassroom discussions.
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  33. Ariane Berthoin Antal, Maria Oppen & André Sobczak (2009). (Re)Discovering the Social Responsibility of Business in Germany. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S3):285-301.score: 1074.0
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  34. Chris Manolis, Ravi Chinta, Rashmi H. Assudani & David J. Burns (2011). The Effect of Pedagogy on Students' Perceptions of the Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility in Business Firms. Ethics and Behavior 21 (2):103-117.score: 1059.0
    Ethics is increasingly viewed to be an important component of business education. However, assessment of the ethics component of business education has not received the same degree of examination as has assessment of the functional areas. Instead, ethics education is often simply assumed to be effective. Is it? The objective of this study is to begin to explore this question by examining the effects of the integration of ethics into a functional area of business education, specifically a (...)
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  35. Anna-Maija Lämsä, Meri Vehkaperä, Tuomas Puttonen & Hanna-Leena Pesonen (2008). Effect of Business Education on Women and Men Students' Attitudes on Corporate Responsibility in Society. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):45 - 58.score: 1057.0
    This article describes a survey among Finnish business students to find answers to the following questions: How do business students define a well-run company? What are their attitudes on the responsibilities of business in society? Do the attitudes of women students differ from those of men? What is the influence of business education on these attitudes? Our sample comprised 217 students pursuing a master’s degree in business studies at two Finnish universities. The results show that, (...)
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  36. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (2012). Freedom of Expression, Internet Responsibility, and Business Ethics: The Yahoo! Saga and Its Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):353-365.score: 1056.0
    In the late 1990s, the Internet seemed a perfect medium for business: a facilitator of unlimited economical propositions to people without any regulatory limitations. Cases such as that of Yahoo! mark the beginning of the end of that illusion. They demonstrate that Internet service providers (ISPs) have to respect domestic state legislation in order to avoid legal risks. Yahoo! was wrong to ignore French national laws and the plea to remove Nazi memorabilia from its auction site. Its legal struggle (...)
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  37. Ali M. Quazi & Dennis O'Brien (2000). An Empirical Test of a Cross-National Model of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):33 - 51.score: 1051.0
    Most models of corporate social responsibility revolve around the controversy as to whether business is a single dimensional entity of profit maximization or a multi-dimensional entity serving greater societal interests. Furthermore, the models are mostly descriptive in nature and are based on the experiences of western countries. There has been little attempt to develop a model that accounts for corporate social responsibility in diverse environments with differing socio-cultural and market settings. In this paper an attempt (...)
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  38. Nabil A. Ibrahim, Donald P. Howard & John P. Angelidis (2008). The Relationship Between Religiousness and Corporate Social Responsibility Orientation: Are There Differences Between Business Managers and Students? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):165 - 174.score: 1051.0
    The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there is a relationship between a person's degree of religiousness and corporate social responsibility orientation. A total of 411 managers and 506 students from seven universities were surveyed. The statistical analysis showed that religiousness does influence students' orientation toward the economic, ethical, and philanthropic responsibilities of business. It does not, however, have a significant impact upon the managers' attitudes. When the "low religiousness" students and managers were compared, differences (...)
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  39. William H. Shaw (2009). Marxism, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):565 - 576.score: 1050.0
    Originally delivered at a conference of Marxist philosophers in China, this article examines some links, and some tensions, between business ethics and the traditional concerns of Marxism. After discussing the emergence of business ethics as an academic discipline, it explores and attempts to answer two Marxist objections that might be brought against the enterprise of business ethics. The first is that business ethics is impossible because capitalism itself tends to produce greedy, overreaching, and unethical business (...)
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  40. Alexandro Kleine & Michael von Hauff (2009). Sustainability-Driven Implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility: Application of the Integrative Sustainability Triangle. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):517 - 533.score: 1050.0
    Current corporate social responsibility (CSR) approaches attempt to implement the vision of sustainable development at the corporate level. In fact, the term "corporate sustainability" may be a more accurate descriptive label for these attempts. Ambitious governmental, business and academic goals, and corresponding efforts have been established. Nonetheless, a truly satisfactory implementation of the broad CSR concept as well as the more specific challenges of corporate sustainability continue to be an elusive goal at the corporate management level. This (...)
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  41. Philipp Schreck (2011). Reviewing the Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility: New Evidence and Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):167-188.score: 1050.0
    This study complements previous empirical research on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) by employing hitherto unused data on corporate social performance (CSP) and proposing statistical analyses to account for bi-directional causality between social and financial performance. By allowing for differences in the importance of single components of CSP between industries, the data in this study overcome certain limitations of the databases used in earlier studies. The econometrics employed offer a rigorous way of (...)
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  42. Susan Margaret Hart (2010). Self-Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Business Case: Do They Work in Achieving Workplace Equality and Safety? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):585 - 600.score: 1050.0
    The political shift toward an economic liberalism in many developed market economies, emphasizing the importance of the marketplace rather than government intervention in the economy and society (Dorman, Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management: Perspectives on an International Development, 2000; Tombs, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 3(1): 24-25, 2005; Walters, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 03(2):3-19, 2005), featured a prominent discourse centered on the need for business flexibility and competitiveness in a global economy (Dorman, 2000; (...)
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  43. William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee (2007). Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. Versus China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265 - 284.score: 1050.0
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ (...)
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  44. Ian Holliday (2005). Doing Business with Rights Violating Regimes Corporate Social Responsibility and Myanmar's Military Junta. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):329 - 342.score: 1050.0
    Whether to do business with rights violating regimes is one of many dilemmas faced by socially responsible corporations. In this article the difficult case of Myanmar is considered. Ruled for decades by a closed and sometimes brutal military elite, the country has long been subject to informal and formal sanctions. However, as sanctions have failed to trigger political reform, it is necessary to review the policy options. The focus here is on the contribution socially responsible corporations might make to (...)
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  45. Jouni Korhonen (2003). On the Ethics of Corporate Social Responsibility – Considering the Paradigm of Industrial Metabolism. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):301-315.score: 1050.0
    This paper attempts to bridge business ethics to corporate social responsibility including the social and environmental dimensions. The objective of the paper is to suggest a conceptual methodology with which ethics of corporate environmental management tools can be considered. The method includes two stages that are required for a shift away from the current dominant unsustainable paradigm and toward a more sustainable paradigm. The first stage is paradigmatic, metaphoric and normative. The second stage is a practical (...)
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  46. Krista Bondy, Jeremy Moon & Dirk Matten (2012). An Institution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Multi-National Corporations (MNCs): Form and Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):281-299.score: 1050.0
    This article investigates corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an institution within UK multi-national corporations (MNCs). In the context of the literature on the institutionalization of CSR and on critical CSR, it presents two main findings. First, it contributes to the CSR mainstream literature by confirming that CSR has not only become institutionalized in society but that a form of this institution is also present within MNCs. Secondly, it contributes to the critical CSR literature by suggesting that unlike broader (...)
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  47. Gary Fooks, Anna Gilmore, Jeff Collin, Chris Holden & Kelley Lee (2013). The Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility: Techniques of Neutralization, Stakeholder Management and Political CSR. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):283-299.score: 1050.0
    Since scholarly interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has primarily focused on the synergies between social and economic performance, our understanding of how (and the conditions under which) companies use CSR to produce policy outcomes that work against public welfare has remained comparatively underdeveloped. In particular, little is known about how corporate decision-makers privately reconcile the conflicts between public and private interests, even though this is likely to be relevant to understanding the limitations of CSR as a (...)
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  48. María de la Cruz Déniz Déniz & Ma Katiuska Cabrera Suárez (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility and Family Business in Spain. Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):27 - 41.score: 1050.0
    Despite the economic relevance and distinctiveness of family firms, little attention has been devoted to researching their nature and functioning. Traditionally, family firms have been associated both to positive and negative features in their relationships with the stakeholders. This can be linked to different orientations toward corporate social responsibility. Thus, this research aims to identify the approaches that Spanish family firms maintain about social responsibility, based on the model developed by Quazi and O' Brien Journal of (...)
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  49. Eugene K. B. Tan (2013). Molding the Nascent Corporate Social Responsibility Agenda in Singapore: Of Pragmatism, Soft Regulation, and the Economic Imperative. [REVIEW] Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):185-204.score: 1050.0
    This paper seeks to examine the putative growth of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Singapore. A key impetus for the nascent CSR movement in twenty-first century Singapore is the economic imperative. As a trade-dependent industrializing economy, the economic development drive coupled with the need for international expansion has made it necessary for Singapore businesses to be cognizant of the growing CSR movement in the western, industrialized world. The government supports the CSR endeavour with an instrumental bent, where CSR (...)
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  50. Constantine Imafidon Tongo (2013). Social Responsibility, Quality of Work Life and Motivation to Contribute in the Nigerian Society. Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.score: 1050.0
    Presently, the social responsibility literature is replete with the diverse ways in which work organizations and the regulatory nation states in which they are domiciled can improve the quality of their workers’ lives. But do workers themselves become motivated to contribute (i.e., give back) to society when they experience a work life of better quality than their peers? Specifically, which sectors of society do such workers contribute to? Through a questionnaire that was administered to a cross section of (...)
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