Search results for 'Social sciences Information services' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.) (2009). Digital Cognitive Technologies: Epistemology and Knowledge Society. Iste Ltd.score: 478.0
    Digital Cognitive Technologies is an interdisciplinary book which assesses the socio-technical stakes of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), which are at the core of the Knowledge Society. This book addresses eight major issues, analyzed by authors writing from a Human and Social Science and a Science and Technology perspective. The contributions seek to explore whether and how ICTs are changing our perception of time, space, social structures and networks, document writing and dissemination, sense-making and interpretation, cooperation, politics, (...)
     
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  2. Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.) (2010). Digital Cognitive Technologies: Epistemology and the Knowledge Economy. John Wiley & Sons.score: 478.0
    Digital Cognitive Technologies is an interdisciplinary book which assesses the socio-technical stakes of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), which are at the core of the Knowledge Society. This book addresses eight major issues, analyzed by authors writing from a Human and Social Science and a Science and Technology perspective. The contributions seek to explore whether and how ICTs are changing our perception of time, space, social structures and networks, document writing and dissemination, sense-making and interpretation, cooperation, politics, (...)
     
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  3. Archie L. Dick (2002). Social Epistemology, Information Science and Ideology. Social Epistemology 16 (1):23 – 35.score: 300.0
    Margaret Egan and Jesse Hauk Shera's original conception of social epistemology has never been defined unambiguously, or developed significantly beyond its early formulation. An interesting consequence of this lack of conceptual clarity has been the application of several interpretations of social epistemology. This article discusses how social epistemology was linked with the ideology of apartheid, and with racially segregated library and information services in the Republic of South Africa. In a fraudulent scientific vision for librarianship, (...)
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  4. Mette Ebbesen (2008). The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development. Nanoethics 2 (3):333-333.score: 288.0
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created (...)
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  5. Enric J. Novella (2008). Theoretical Accounts on Deinstitutionalization and the Reform of Mental Health Services: A Critical Review. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):303-314.score: 283.5
    This article offers a comprehensive critical review of the most popular theoretical accounts on the recent processes of deinstitutionalization and reform of mental health services and their possible underlying factors, focusing in the sharp contrast between the straightforward ideas and models maintained by mainstream psychiatry and the different interpretations delivered by authors coming from the social sciences or applying conceptual tools stemming from diverse social theories. Since all these appraisals tend to illuminate only some aspects of (...)
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  6. Dominique Cardon & Christophe Prieur (2009). Networks of Relations on the Internet: A Research Object for Information Technology and Social Sciences. In Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.), Digital Cognitive Technologies: Epistemology and Knowledge Society. Iste Ltd.score: 256.5
  7. Yitzhak Berman, A. Solomon Eaglstein & David Phillips (1995). Policy Impact on Information Technology Programming in the Social Services. Knowledge and Policy 8 (1):23-32.score: 243.0
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  8. Ouyang Kang (2008). On the Emergence and the Research Outline of Social Information Science. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 46:37-52.score: 238.5
    Social Information Science (or Social Informatics) is a new and interdiscipline branch subject in China. This paper probe the emergence and the research outline of social information science. 1. The proposal of the social information science. We set up the research from an extension from the theoretical informatics to the concrete informatics; a internal bond of integrating various subjects in humane and social sciences; an intersection and mutual permeation between the (...) science and the natural science; a the intersection and interaction among humane and social sciences, modern information science and information technology; a strengthening to the research into Social Epistemology. Ⅱ. On the concept of social information. Social information directly is different with selfexistent and natural information, and more related to human’s autonomous creative activities, to society’s culture inheritance, to social value, to human’s spiritual interaction and to human’s emotions. Ⅲ.On the theoretical orientation of the social information science. Social Information Science is a concrete branch of informatics, a generation of sub-disciplines of social information, a kind of traversing and comprehensive research on individual social science from the angle of information, a kind of exchange and interaction between social theoretical research and the modern information technology. Ⅳ. The research focus of the social information science. The paper lists 10 main focus in the research of social information science. Ⅴ.The system and frame of the social information science. In general, there should be four levels of researches if the social information science is to be viewed as a relatively independent subject: the philosophical level, the scientific theoretical level, concrete apply level, social information technology and methods. (shrink)
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  9. Tom Børsen, Avan N. Antia & Mirjam Sophia Glessmer (2013). A Case Study of Teaching Social Responsibility to Doctoral Students in the Climate Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1491-1504.score: 228.0
    The need to make young scientists aware of their social responsibilities is widely acknowledged, although the question of how to actually do it has so far gained limited attention. A 2-day workshop entitled “Prepared for social responsibility?” attended by doctoral students from multiple disciplines in climate science, was targeted at the perceived needs of the participants and employed a format that took them through three stages of ethics education: sensitization, information and empowerment. The workshop aimed at preparing (...)
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  10. Lan Anh Hoang, Jean-Christophe Castella & Paul Novosad (2006). Social Networks and Information Access: Implications for Agricultural Extension in a Rice Farming Community in Northern Vietnam. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):513-527.score: 207.0
    Village communities are not homogeneous entities but a combination of complex networks of social relationships. Many factors such as ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, and power relations determine one’s access to information and resources. Development workers’ inadequate understanding of local social networks, norms, and power relations may further the interests of better-off farmers and marginalize the poor. This paper explores how social networks function as assets for individuals and households in the rural areas of developing countries and (...)
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  11. Lasse Gerrits & Peter Marks (forthcoming). The Evolution of Wright's (1932) Adaptive Field to Contemporary Interpretations and Uses of Fitness Landscapes in the Social Sciences. Biology and Philosophy:1-21.score: 204.0
    The concepts of adaptation and fitness have such an appeal that they have been used in other scientific domains, including the social sciences. One particular aspect of this theory transfer concerns the so-called fitness landscape models. At first sight, fitness landscapes visualize how an agent, of any kind, relates to its environment, how its position is conditional because of the mutual interaction with other agents, and the potential routes towards improved fitness. The allure of fitness landscapes is first (...)
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  12. Norbis Díaz Campos & Macías Llanes (2013). Knowledge management model of Center for the Development of Humanities and Social Sciences in Health. Humanidades Médicas 13 (2):314-329.score: 202.5
    La gestión del conocimiento es un proceso relacionado con la producción, transmisión y utilización del conocimiento y su pertinencia para el desempeño organizacional; en la actualidad han aparecido diversidad de modelos que prescriben su configuración. El presente artículo describe el modelo que fundamenta teórica y metodológicamente la aplicación de la gestión del conocimiento en el Centro de Desarrollo de las Ciencias Sociales y Humanísticas en Salud. Esta entidad dedicada a la producción y transmisión del conocimiento científico en estas áreas de (...)
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  13. Theodore R. Sarbin & John I. Kitsuse (eds.) (1994). Constructing the Social. Sage.score: 193.5
    If you are looking for a clear, concrete overview on social constructionist research and analysis, look no further than Constructing the Social. This timely volume pools the talents of many leading psychologists and sociologists, who in each case ground theory into practical examples. Contributors demonstrate that human beings are principally social agents rather than passive reactors that process information. Each contributor analyzes the historical and cultural contexts implicit in a wide range of key issues including anxiety, (...)
     
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  14. Henrik Sinding-Larsen (1987). Information Technology and the Management of Knowledge. AI and Society 1 (2):93-101.score: 184.5
    The social sciences lack concepts and theories for an understanding of what new information technology is doing to our society. The article sketches the outlines of a broad historical and comparative approach to this issue: ‘an anthropology of information technology’. At the base is the idea ofexternalisation of knowledge as a historical process. Three main epochs are characterised by externalisation of knowledge through a) spoken language and a social organisation of specialists, b) writing and c) (...)
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  15. James McCollum (2012). Hermeneutical Injustice and the Social Sciences: Development Policy and Positional Objectivity. Social Epistemology 26 (2):189-200.score: 181.5
    In Epistemic injustice, Miranda Fricker employs the critical concept of hermeneutical injustice. Such injustice entails unequal participation in the epistemic practices of a community that often results in an inability of dominated subjects to understand their own experiences and have them understood by their community. I argue that hermeneutical injustice can be an aspect of institutions as well communites?to the extent that they too engage in epistemic practices that seek to understand the problems and experiences of their constituents. My primary (...)
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  16. Mario Bunge (2004). Mitos, Hechos y Razones: Cuatro Estudios Sociales. Sudamericana.score: 180.0
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  17. Lawrence Scott Sugiyama & Michelle Scalise Sugiyama (2003). Social Roles, Prestige, and Health Risk. Human Nature 14 (2):165-190.score: 180.0
    Selection pressure from health risk is hypothesized to have shaped adaptations motivating individuals to attempt to become valued by other individuals by generously and recurrently providing beneficial goods and/or services to them because this strategy encouraged beneficiaries to provide costly health care to their benefactors when the latter were sick or injured. Additionally, adaptations are hypothesized to have co-evolved that motivate individuals to attend to and value those who recurrently provide them with important benefits so they are willing in (...)
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  18. Kai Ma Chan, Anne D. Guerry, Patricia Balvanera, Sarah Klain, Terre Satterfield, Xavier Basurto, Ann Bostrom, Ratana Chuenpagdee, Rachelle Gould & Benjamin S. Halpern (2012). Where Are Cultural and Social in Ecosystem Services? A Framework for Constructive Engagement. Bioscience 62 (8):744-756.score: 172.5
    A focus on ecosystem services (ES) is seen as a means for improving decisionmaking. In the research to date, the valuation of the material contri- butions of ecosystems to human well-being has been emphasized, with less attention to important cultural ES and nonmaterial values. This gap persists because there is no commonly accepted framework for eliciting less tangible values, characterizing their changes, and including them along- side other services in decisionmaking. Here, we develop such a framework for ES (...)
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  19. Denis Phan & Franck Varenne (2010). Agent-Based Models and Simulations in Economics and Social Sciences: From Conceptual Exploration to Distinct Ways of Experimenting. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 13 (1).score: 168.0
    Now that complex Agent-Based Models and computer simulations spread over economics and social sciences - as in most sciences of complex systems -, epistemological puzzles (re)emerge. We introduce new epistemological concepts so as to show to what extent authors are right when they focus on some empirical, instrumental or conceptual significance of their model or simulation. By distinguishing between models and simulations, between types of models, between types of computer simulations and between types of empiricity obtained through (...)
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  20. Jack G. Conrad (2010). E-Discovery Revisited: The Need for Artificial Intelligence Beyond Information Retrieval. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):321-345.score: 168.0
    In this work, we provide a broad overview of the distinct stages of E-Discovery. We portray them as an interconnected, often complex workflow process, while relating them to the general Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM). We start with the definition of E-Discovery. We then describe the very positive role that NIST’s Text REtrieval Conference (TREC) has added to the science of E-Discovery, in terms of the tasks involved and the evaluation of the legal discovery work performed. Given the critical nature (...)
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  21. David J. Bjornstad & Amy K. Wolfe (2011). Adding to the Mix: Integrating ELSI Into a National Nanoscale Science and Technology Center. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):743-760.score: 165.0
    This paper describes issues associated with integrating the study of Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (ELSI) into ongoing scientific and technical research and describes an approach adopted by the authors for their own work with the center for nanophase materials sciences (CNMS) at the Oak Ridge national laboratory (ORNL). Four key questions are considered: (a) What is ELSI and how should it identify and address topics of interest for the CNMS? (b) What advantages accrue to incorporating ELSI into (...)
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  22. Muriel Bebeau & Verna Monson (2011). Authorship and Publication Practices in the Social Sciences: Historical Reflections on Current Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):365-388.score: 164.0
    An historical review of authorship definitions and publication practices that are embedded in directions to authors and in the codes of ethics in the fields of psychology, sociology, and education illuminates reasonable agreement and consistency across the fields with regard to (a) originality of the work submitted, (b) data sharing, (c) human participants’ protection, and (d) conflict of interest disclosure. However, the role of the professional association in addressing violations of research or publication practices varies among these fields. Psychology and (...)
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  23. Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.) (2009). The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 162.0
  24. Franck Varenne (2010). Framework for M&S with Agents in Regard to Agent Simulations in Social Sciences: Emulation and Simulation. In Alexandre Muzy, David R. C. Hill & Bernard P. Zeigler (eds.), Activity-Based Modeling and Simulation. Presses Universitaires Blaise-Pascal.score: 162.0
    The aim of this paper is to discuss the “Framework for M&S with Agents” (FMSA) proposed by Zeigler et al. [2000, 2009] in regard to the diverse epistemological aims of agent simulations in social sciences. We first show that there surely are great similitudes, hence that the aim to emulate a universal “automated modeler agent” opens new ways of interactions between these two domains of M&S with agents. E.g., it can be shown that the multi-level conception at the (...)
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  25. Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.) (2003). Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 162.0
    Realism in Action is a selection of essays written by leading representatives in the fields of action theory and philosophy of mind, philosophy of the social sciences and especially the nature of social action, and of epistemology and philosophy of science. Practical reason, reasons and causes in action theory, intending and trying, and folk-psychological explanation are some of the topics discussed by these leading participants. A particular emphasis is laid on trust, commitments and social institutions, on (...)
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  26. J. Coates (1996). The Claims of Common Sense: Moore, Wittgenstein, Keynes and the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 162.0
    The Claims of Common Sense investigates the importance of ideas developed by Cambridge philosophers between the World Wars for the social sciences concerning common sense, vague concepts, and ordinary language. John Coates examines the thought of Moore, Ramsey, Wittgenstein and Keynes, and traces their common drift away from early beliefs about the need for precise concepts and a canonical notation in analysis. He argues that Keynes borrowed from Wittgenstein and Ramsey their reappraisal of vague concepts, and developed the (...)
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  27. David Goldblatt (ed.) (2000). Knowledge and the Social Sciences: Theory, Method, Practice. Routledge, in Association with Open University.score: 162.0
    This book provides a clear introduction to key philosophical and epistemological issues in the social sciences, to both positivist and interpretative methodologies through comparing contemporary debates surrounding social change.
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  28. Harold Kincaid (1996). Philosophical Foundations of the Social Sciences: Analyzing Controversies in Social Research. Cambridge University Press.score: 162.0
    This book defends the prospects for a science of society. It argues that behind the diverse methods of the natural sciences lies a common core of scientific rationality that the social sciences can and sometimes do achieve. It also argues that good social science must be in part about large-scale social structures and processes and thus that methodological individualism is misguided. These theses are supported by a detailed discussion of actual social research, including theories (...)
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  29. Stephen P. Turner & Paul Andrew Roth (eds.) (2003). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell Pub..score: 162.0
    Presents a collection of essays that cover a variety of issues in the social sciences.
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  30. Zuyi Du (2000). The Scientific Merit of the Social Sciences: Implications for Research and Application. Trentham Books.score: 162.0
    CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION To date, the social sciences have had only limited success in the definition and solution of pressing social problems which without ...
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  31. Bent Flyvbjerg (2001). Making Social Science Matter: Why Social Inquiry Fails and How It Can Succeed Again. Cambridge University Press.score: 162.0
    Making Social Science Matter presents an exciting new approach to the social and behavioral sciences including theoretical argument, methodological guidelines, and examples of practical application. Why has social science failed in attempts to emulate natural science and produce normal theory? Bent Flyvbjerg argues that the strength of social sciences lies in its rich, reflexive analysis of values and power, essential to the social and economic development of any society. Richly informed, powerfully argued, and (...)
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  32. Peter Wagner (2001). A History and Theory of the Social Sciences: Not All That is Solid Melts Into Air. Sage.score: 162.0
    Divided into two parts this book examines the train of social theory from the 19th century, through to the `organization of modernity', in relation to ideas of social planning, and as contributors to the `rationalistic revolution' of the `golden age' of capitalism in the 1950s and 60s. Part two examines key concepts in the social sciences. It begins with some of the broadest concepts used by social scientists: choice, decision, action and institution and moves on (...)
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  33. Adam M. Hedgecoe (2001). Ethical Boundary Work: Geneticization, Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):305-309.score: 162.0
    This paper is a response to Henk ten Have's Genetics and Culture: The Geneticization thesis . In it, I refute Ten Have's suggestion that geneticization is not the sort of process that can be measured and commented on in terms of empirical evidence,even if he is correct in suggesting that it should be seen as part of ‘philosophical discourse’. At the end, I relate this discussion to broader debates within bioethics between the social science and philosophy, and suggest the (...)
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  34. Chrysostomos Mantzavinos (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 162.0
    This volume is a unique contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences, presenting the results of cutting-edge philosophers' research alongside critical discussions by practicing social scientists. The book is motivated by the view that the philosophy of the social sciences cannot ignore the specific scientific practices according to which social scientific work is being conducted, and that it will be valuable only if it evolves in constant interaction with theoretical developments in the (...) sciences. With its unique format guaranteeing a genuine discussion between philosophers and social scientists, this thought-provoking volume extends the frontiers of the field. It will appeal to all scholars and students interested in the interplay between philosophy and the social sciences. (shrink)
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  35. Gennady S. Batygin (2004). Social Scientists in Times of Crisis: The Structural Transformations Within the Disciplinary Organization and Thematic Repertoire of the Social Sciences. Studies in East European Thought 56 (1):7-54.score: 162.0
    This is a contribution to thesociology and social epistemology of knowledgeproduction in Russian social sciences today. Inthe initial section, the epistemic status andsocial function of Soviet social scientificdiscourse are characterized in terms of textualforms and their modes of (re-)production. Theremaining sections detail the course of therestructuration of social scientific discoursesince the fall of the Soviet Union and draw onextant empirical sources, in particular studiesof bibliographical rubrics, thematicrepertoires, and current textual formsthroughout the public sphere and the (...)
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  36. Donald Lawson Turcotte, John Rundle & Hans Frauenfelder (eds.) (2002). Self-Organized Complexity in the Physical, Biological, and Social Sciences. National Academy of Sciences.score: 162.0
    Self-organized complexity in the physical, biological, and social sciences Donald L Turcotte*f and John B. Rundle* *Department of Earth and Atmospheric ...
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  37. Sabyasachi Bhattacharya (ed.) (2007). Development of Modern Indian Thought and the Social Sciences. Oxford University Press.score: 162.0
    This important volume provides an overview of the history of social, economic, and political thought prior to the development of disciplinary categories in social sciences. It contextualizes the thought movements in the matrix of pre-modern intellectual traditions as well as the long-range history of society, polity, and economy in modern India. Thematically organized into five sections, the first part examines the evolution of economic thinking in modern India. The next section deals with the discourse of social (...)
     
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  38. David Inglis, John Bone & Rhoda Wilkie (eds.) (2005). Nature: Critical Concepts in the Social Sciences. Routledge.score: 162.0
    Many influential stances within the social sciences regard nature in one of two ways: either as none of their concern (which is with the social and cultural aspects of human existence), or as wholly a social and cultural fabrication. But there is also another strand of social scientific thinking that seeks to understand the interplay between social and cultural factors on one side and natural factors on the other. These volumes contain the main contributions (...)
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  39. Engin Bozdag (2013). Bias in Algorithmic Filtering and Personalization. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):209-227.score: 162.0
    Online information intermediaries such as Facebook and Google are slowly replacing traditional media channels thereby partly becoming the gatekeepers of our society. To deal with the growing amount of information on the social web and the burden it brings on the average user, these gatekeepers recently started to introduce personalization features, algorithms that filter information per individual. In this paper we show that these online services that filter information are not merely algorithms. Humans not (...)
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  40. Daniela Cojocaru, Stefan Cojocaru & Antonio Sandu (2011). The Role of Religion in the System of Social and Medical Services in Post-Communism Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (28):65-83.score: 162.0
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} This article aims to examine the phenomenon of social services in post-1989 Romania, underscoring the role of the religious factor in the establishment and operation of nongovernmental organisations active in the area of family and child protection/child welfare. The results are based on empirical data collected from interviews (...)
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  41. Mark J. Smith (ed.) (2005). Philosophy & Methodology of the Social Sciences. Sage.score: 162.0
    This is a comprehensive and authoritative reference collection in the philosophy and methodology of the social sciences. The source materials selected are drawn from debates within the natural sciences as well as social scientific practice. This four volume set covers the traditional literature on the philosophy of the social sciences, and the contemporary philosophical and methodological debates developing at the heart of the disciplinary and interdisciplinary groups in the social sciences. It addresses (...)
     
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  42. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). Logical Empiricism and the Special Sciences: Reichenbach, Feigl, and Nagel. Garland Publ..score: 159.0
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional (...)
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  43. Wolfgang Hofkirchner (2007). A Critical Social Systems View of the Internet. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):471-500.score: 153.0
    The article discusses principles that form part of evolutionary systems thinking in social sciences and humanities. It is argued that introducing the concept of self-organization relates agency and structures in a way that makes it possible to take up certain features of Critical Theory by which it can meet the demands for a critical social science. These principles are applied to the question of whether there is convergence or divergence in and by means of the Internet. It (...)
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  44. Bruce Bridgeman (2006). It is Not Evolutionary Models, but Models in General That Social Science Needs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):351-352.score: 153.0
    Mathematical models are potentially as useful for culture as for evolution, but cultural models must have different designs from genetic models. Social sciences must borrow from biology the idea of modeling, rather than the structure of models, because copying the product is fundamentally different from copying the design. Transfer of most cultural information from brains to artificial media increases the differences between cultural and biological information. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  45. Robert A. Wilson (2004). Recent Work on Individualism in the Social, Behavioural, and Biological Sciences. Biology and Philosophy 19 (3):397-423.score: 150.0
    The social, behavioral, and a good chunk of the biological sciences concern the nature of individual agency, where our paradigm for an individual is a human being. Theories of economic behavior, of mental function and dysfunction, and of ontogenetic development, for example, are theories of how such individuals act, and of what internal and external factors are determinative of that action. Such theories construe individuals in distinctive ways.
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  46. Ronald Keith Gaddie, Russell Keith Johnson & John K. Wildgen (1998). Geographic Information Systems in Social Policy Formation. In Barbara L. Neuby (ed.), Relevancy of the Social Sciences in the Next Millennium. The State University of West Georgia.score: 148.5
     
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  47. Roger Trigg (2001). Understanding Social Science: A Philosophical Introduction to the Social Sciences. Blackwell Publisers.score: 148.0
    In this lucid and engaging introductory volume on the nature of society, Roger Trigg examines the scientific basis of social science and shows that philosophical presuppositions are a necessary starting point for the study of society.
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  48. Peter Baehr (2010). Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences. Stanford University Press.score: 148.0
    A study of Hannah Arendt's indictment of social science, approaches to totalitarianism (Bolshevism and National Socialism), and of the robust responses of her ...
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  49. Ian C. Jarvie & Jesus Zamoro Bonilla (eds.) (2011). The SAGE Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences. SAGE.score: 148.0
    In this excting Handbook, Jarvie and Bonilla provide a broad and democratic coverage of the many currents in social science.
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