Search results for 'Social sciences Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.) (2003). Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 176.0
    Realism in Action is a selection of essays written by leading representatives in the fields of action theory and philosophy of mind, philosophy of the social sciences and especially the nature of social action, and of epistemology and philosophy of science. Practical reason, reasons and causes in action theory, intending and trying, and folk-psychological explanation are some of the topics discussed by these leading participants. A particular emphasis is laid on trust, commitments and (...) institutions, on the possibility of grounding social notions in individual social attitudes, on the nature of social groups, institutions and collective intentionality, and on common belief and common knowledge. Applications to the social sciences include, e.g., a look at the Erklären-Verstehen controversy in economics, and at constructivist and realist views on archeological reconstructions of the past. (shrink)
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  2. Chrysostomos Mantzavinos (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 176.0
    This volume is a unique contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences, presenting the results of cutting-edge philosophers' research alongside critical discussions by practicing social scientists. The book is motivated by the view that the philosophy of the social sciences cannot ignore the specific scientific practices according to which social scientific work is being conducted, and that it will be valuable only if it evolves in constant interaction with theoretical developments in (...)
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  3. Mark J. Smith (ed.) (2005). Philosophy & Methodology of the Social Sciences. Sage.score: 176.0
    This is a comprehensive and authoritative reference collection in the philosophy and methodology of the social sciences. The source materials selected are drawn from debates within the natural sciences as well as social scientific practice. This four volume set covers the traditional literature on the philosophy of the social sciences, and the contemporary philosophical and methodological debates developing at the heart of the disciplinary and interdisciplinary groups in the social sciences. (...)
     
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  4. Stephen P. Turner & Paul Andrew Roth (eds.) (2003). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell Pub..score: 161.0
    Presents a collection of essays that cover a variety of issues in the social sciences.
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  5. Ian C. Jarvie & Jesus Zamoro Bonilla (eds.) (2011). The SAGE Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences. SAGE.score: 153.7
    In this excting Handbook, Jarvie and Bonilla provide a broad and democratic coverage of the many currents in social science.
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  6. Christopher Hookway & Philip Pettit (eds.) (1977). Action and Interpretation: Studies in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 148.0
    Whether the interpretations made by social scientists of the thoughts, utterances and actions of other people, including those from an alien culture or a ...
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  7. Adam M. Hedgecoe (2001). Ethical Boundary Work: Geneticization, Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):305-309.score: 147.0
    This paper is a response to Henk ten Have's Genetics and Culture: The Geneticization thesis . In it, I refute Ten Have's suggestion that geneticization is not the sort of process that can be measured and commented on in terms of empirical evidence,even if he is correct in suggesting that it should be seen as part of ‘philosophical discourse’. At the end, I relate this discussion to broader debates within bioethics between the social science and philosophy, and suggest (...)
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  8. S. I. Benn & G. W. Mortimore (eds.) (1976). Rationality and the Social Sciences: Contributions to the Philosophy and Methodology of the Social Sciences. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 147.0
  9. Robert Bishop (2007). The Philosophy of the Social Sciences: An Introduction. Continuum.score: 147.0
  10. Len Doyal (1986). Empiricism, Explanation, and Rationality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 147.0
  11. Antony Flew (1985). Thinking About Social Thinking: The Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell.score: 147.0
  12. I. C. Jarvie, Zamora Bonilla & P. Jesús (eds.) (2011). The Sage Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Sage.score: 147.0
  13. Peter T. Manicas (1987). A History and Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Basil Blackwell.score: 147.0
     
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  14. Maurice Alexander Natanson (1963). Philosophy of the Social Sciences. New York, Random House.score: 147.0
     
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  15. Vernon Pratt (1978). The Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Methuen.score: 147.0
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  16. Murray Newton Rothbard (1979). Individualism and the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Cato Institute.score: 147.0
     
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  17. Alan Ryan (1970). The Philosophy of the Social Sciences. London,Macmillan.score: 147.0
  18. Keith Webb (1995). An Introduction to Problems in the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Pinter.score: 147.0
     
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  19. Stefan Schubert (2012). Ernest Gellner's Use of the Social Sciences in Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences (1):0048393112444319.score: 145.0
    It is well known that Ernest Gellner made substantial use of his knowledge of the social sciences in philosophy. Here I discuss how he used it on the basis of a few examples taken from Gellner’s philosophical output. It is argued that he made a number of highly original “translations”, orre-interpretations, of philosophical theories and problems using his knowledge of the social sciences. While this method is endorsed, it is also argued that some of Gellner’s (...)
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  20. Philip Mirowski (2004). The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.score: 144.0
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge‘ is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy‘ are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the (...) of science tend to be molded by the actual regimes of science organization within which they are embedded. These theses are illustrated by consideration of three representative philosophers of science: John Dewey, Hans Reichenbach, and Philip Kitcher. [Copyright &y& Elsevier]. (shrink)
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  21. Peter T. Manicas (2006). A Realist Philosophy of Social Science: Explanation and Understanding. Cambridge University Press.score: 142.0
    This introduction to the philosophy of social science provides an original conception of the task and nature of social inquiry. Peter Manicas discusses the role of causality seen in the physical sciences and offers a reassessment of the problem of explanation from a realist perspective. He argues that the fundamental goal of theory in both the natural and social sciences is not, contrary to widespread opinion, prediction and control, or the explanation of events (including (...)
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  22. Peter Winch (2008/2007). The Idea of a Social Science and its Relation to Philosophy. Routledge.score: 142.0
    The problems dealt with in The Idea of a Social Science are philosophical. It is an attempt to place the social science, considered as a single group, on the intellectual map, with special attention to the relations of the discipline to philosophy on the one hand and the natural sciences on the other. The author holds that the relation between the social sciences and philosophy is commonly misunderstood because of certain fashionable misconceptions about (...)
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  23. Kathryn Dean (ed.) (2006). Realism, Philosophy and Social Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 142.0
    The authors examine the nature of the relationship between social science and philosophy and address the sort of work social science should do, and the role and sorts of claims that an accompanying philosophy should engage in. In particular, the authors reintroduce the question of ontology, an area long overlooked by philosophers of social science, and present a cricital engagement with the work of Roy Bhaskar. The book argues against the excesses of philosophising and commits (...)
     
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  24. Alexander Rosenberg (1995). Philosophy of Social Science. Westview Press.score: 142.0
    This is an expanded and thoroughly revised edition of the widely adopted introduction to the philosophical foundations of the human sciences. Ranging from cultural anthropology to mathematical economics, Alexander Rosenberg leads the reader through behaviorism, naturalism, interpretativism about human action, and macrosocial scientific perspectives, illuminating the motivation and strategy of each.Rewritten throughout to increase accessibility, this new edition retains the remarkable achievement of revealing the social sciences’ enduring relation to the fundamental problems of philosophy. It includes (...)
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  25. John W. Sutherland (1973). A General Systems Philosophy for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. New York,Braziller.score: 141.0
     
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  26. Daniel Steel & Francesco Guala (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of Social Science Reader. Routledge.score: 140.7
    The Philosophy of Social Science Reader is an outstanding, comprehensive and up-to-date collection of key readings in the philosophy of social science, covering the essential issues, problems and debates in this important interdisciplinary area. Each section is carefully introduced by the editors, and the readings placed in context. The anthology is organized into seven clear parts: Values and Social Science Causal Inference and Explanation Interpretation Rationality and Choice Individualism Norms Cultural Evolution. Featuring the work of (...)
     
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  27. Yvonne Sherratt (2006). Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 140.0
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also (...)
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  28. Antti Saaristo (2006). There is No Escape From Philosophy: Collective Intentionality and Empirical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (1):40-66.score: 139.0
    This article examines two empirical research traditions—experimental economics and the social identity approach in social psychology—that may be seen as attempts to falsify and verify the theory of collective intentionality, respectively. The article argues that both approaches fail to settle the issue. However, this is not necessarily due to the alleged immaturity of the social sciences but, possibly, to the philosophical nature of intentionality and intentional action. The article shows how broadly Davidsonian action theory, including Hacking’s (...)
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  29. J. Coates (1996). The Claims of Common Sense: Moore, Wittgenstein, Keynes and the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 131.0
    The Claims of Common Sense investigates the importance of ideas developed by Cambridge philosophers between the World Wars for the social sciences concerning common sense, vague concepts, and ordinary language. John Coates examines the thought of Moore, Ramsey, Wittgenstein and Keynes, and traces their common drift away from early beliefs about the need for precise concepts and a canonical notation in analysis. He argues that Keynes borrowed from Wittgenstein and Ramsey their reappraisal of vague concepts, and developed the (...)
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  30. Brian Fay (1996). Contemporary Philosophy of Social Science: A Multicultural Approach. Blackwell.score: 130.7
    This volume provides a lucid and distinct introduction to multiculturalism and the philosophy of social science.
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  31. Martin Hollis (1994). The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 130.7
    This textbook by Martin Hollis offers an exceptionally clear and concise introduction to the philosophy of social science. It examines questions which give rise to fundamental philosophical issues. Are social structures better conceived of as systems of laws and forces, or as webs of meanings and practices? Is social action better viewed as rational behaviour, or as self-expression? By exploring such questions, the reader is led to reflect upon the nature of scientific method in social (...)
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  32. James F. Ward (1984). Language, Form, and Inquiry: Arthur F. Bentley's Philosophy of Social Science. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 130.7
    I Introduction: Philosophy and Social Science Men "know," but they no longer are so certain that their knowledge will not be rearranged. ...
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  33. Daniel Little (1991). Varieties of Social Explanation: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Social Science. Westview Press.score: 130.7
    Professor Little presents an introduction to the philosophy of social science with an emphasis on the central forms of explanation in social science: rational-intentional, causal, functional, structural, materialist, statistical and interpretive. The book is very strong on recent developments, particularly in its treatment of rational choice theory, microfoundations for social explanation, the idea of supervenience, functionalism, and current discussions of relativism.Of special interest is Professor Little’s insight that, like the philosophy of natural science, the (...) of social science can profit from examining actual scientific examples. Throughout the book, philosophical theory is integrated with recent empirical work on both agrarian and industrial society drawn from political science, sociology, geography, anthropology, and economics.Clearly written and well structured, this text provides the logical and conceptual tools necessary for dealing with the debates at the cutting edge of contemporary philosophy of social science. It will prove indispensible for philosophers, social scientists and their students. (shrink)
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  34. Ted Benton (2001). Philosophy of Social Science: The Philosophical Foundations of Social Thought. Palgrave.score: 127.0
    This is the first book in the new series, is a comprehensive introduction to philosophical problems in the social sciences, encompassing traditional and contemporary perspectives. It is readily accessible, with a firm emphasis on communicating difficult philosophical ideas clearly and effectively to those from outside this discipline. Ted Benton and Ian Craib move systematically through major topic areas, from positivism to post-structuralism, using a wide variety of examples and cases to illustrate key themes.
     
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  35. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2009). Beyond Communication: A Critical Study of Axel Honneth's Social Philosophy. Brill.score: 125.0
    The book will be an indispensable resource for anyone interested in contemporary philosophy and the social sciences.
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  36. Gerard Delanty & Piet Strydom (eds.) (2003). Philosophies of Social Science: The Classic and Contemporary Readings. Open University.score: 124.0
    “This book will certainly prove to be a useful resource and reference point … a good addition to anyone’s bookshelf.” Network "This is a superb collection, expertly presented. The overall conception seems splendid, giving an excellent sense of the issues... The selection and length of the readings is admirably judged, with both the classic texts and the few unpublished pieces making just the right points." William Outhwaite, Professor of Sociology, University of Sussex "... an indispensable book for all of us (...)
     
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  37. Jayant Vishnu Narlikar, Indu Banga & Chhanda Gupta (eds.) (1992). Philosophy of Science: Perspectives From Natural and Social Sciences. Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.score: 122.3
     
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  38. Beatrice Kobow (2014). How to Do Things with Fictions Reconsidering Vaihinger for a Philosophy of Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (2):201-222.score: 119.0
    The article reconstructs three key concepts of Hans Vaihinger: the idea of mental fictions as self-contradictory, provisory, conscious, and purposeful; the law of the devolution of ideas stating that an idea oscillates between dogma, hypothesis, or fiction; and the underlying assumption about human consciousness that the psyche constructs thoughts around perceptions like an oyster produces a pearl. In a second, constructive part, these concepts are applied in a discussion of John Searle’s social ontologically extended theory of speech acts. The (...)
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  39. David Thomas (1979). Naturalism and Social Science: A Post-Empiricist Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 117.7
    This 1979 text addresses the ways in which the dominant theories in large areas of Western social science have been subject to strong criticisms, particularly ...
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  40. Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.) (2009). The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 116.0
  41. Ruth Groff (ed.) (2008). Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Routledge.score: 116.0
    This cutting edge collection of new and previously published articles by philosophers and social scientists addresses just what it means to invoke causal ...
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  42. Martin Hollis (1996). Reason in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 116.0
    Did Adam and Eve act rationally in eating the fruit of the forbidden tree? That can seem to depend solely on whether they had found the best means to their ends, in the spirit of the 'economic' theories of rationality. Martin Hollis respects the elegance and power of these theories but judges their paradoxes endemic. He argues that social action cannot be understood by viewing human beings as abstract individuals with preferences in search of satisfaction, nor by divorcing practical (...)
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  43. David Goldblatt (ed.) (2000). Knowledge and the Social Sciences: Theory, Method, Practice. Routledge, in Association with Open University.score: 116.0
    This book provides a clear introduction to key philosophical and epistemological issues in the social sciences, to both positivist and interpretative methodologies through comparing contemporary debates surrounding social change.
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  44. Harold Kincaid (1996). Philosophical Foundations of the Social Sciences: Analyzing Controversies in Social Research. Cambridge University Press.score: 116.0
    This book defends the prospects for a science of society. It argues that behind the diverse methods of the natural sciences lies a common core of scientific rationality that the social sciences can and sometimes do achieve. It also argues that good social science must be in part about large-scale social structures and processes and thus that methodological individualism is misguided. These theses are supported by a detailed discussion of actual social research, including theories (...)
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  45. Julian Reiss, David Teira & Jesús Zamora Bonilla (2008). What's New in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences?: Guest Editors' Introduction. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (3):311-313.score: 116.0
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  46. Ernest Gellner (1975). A Wittgensteinian Philosophy of (or Against) the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (2):173-199.score: 116.0
  47. Zuyi Du (2000). The Scientific Merit of the Social Sciences: Implications for Research and Application. Trentham Books.score: 116.0
    CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION To date, the social sciences have had only limited success in the definition and solution of pressing social problems which without ...
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  48. Peter Wagner (2001). A History and Theory of the Social Sciences: Not All That is Solid Melts Into Air. Sage.score: 116.0
    Divided into two parts this book examines the train of social theory from the 19th century, through to the `organization of modernity', in relation to ideas of social planning, and as contributors to the `rationalistic revolution' of the `golden age' of capitalism in the 1950s and 60s. Part two examines key concepts in the social sciences. It begins with some of the broadest concepts used by social scientists: choice, decision, action and institution and moves on (...)
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  49. Reinoud Bosch (2013). Book Review: The SAGE Handbook of the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (4):563-569.score: 116.0
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