Search results for 'Social sciences and ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marvin Charles Katz (1969). Sciences of Man and Social Ethics. Boston, Branden Press.score: 147.0
    Ethical self-management; an introduction to systematic personality psychology, by M. C. Katz.--Four axiological proofs of the infinite value of man, by R. S. Hartman.--Some thoughts regarding the current philosophy of the behavioral sciences, by C. R. Rogers.--Autonomy and community, by D. Lee.--Synergy in the society and in the individual, by A. H. Maslow.--Human nature: its cause and effect; a theoretical framework for understanding human motivation, by M. C. Katz.--Mental health; a generic attitude, by G. W. Allport.--Love feelings in courtship (...)
     
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  2. Leo R. Ward (1959). Ethics and the Social Sciences. [Notre Dame, Ind.]University of Notre Dame Press.score: 145.0
     
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  3. David S. Bright, Bradley A. Winn & Jason Kanov (2013). Reconsidering Virtue: Differences of Perspective in Virtue Ethics and the Positive Social Sciences. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (4):1-16.score: 143.0
    This paper describes differences in two perspectives on the idea of virtue as a theoretical foundation for positive organizational ethics (POE). The virtue ethics perspective is grounded in the philosophical tradition, has classical roots, and focuses attention on virtue as a property of character. The positive social science perspective is a recent movement (e.g., positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship) that has implications for POE. The positive social science movement operationalizes virtue through an empirical lens that (...)
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  4. Muriel Bebeau & Verna Monson (2011). Authorship and Publication Practices in the Social Sciences: Historical Reflections on Current Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):365-388.score: 135.0
    An historical review of authorship definitions and publication practices that are embedded in directions to authors and in the codes of ethics in the fields of psychology, sociology, and education illuminates reasonable agreement and consistency across the fields with regard to (a) originality of the work submitted, (b) data sharing, (c) human participants’ protection, and (d) conflict of interest disclosure. However, the role of the professional association in addressing violations of research or publication practices varies among these fields. Psychology (...)
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  5. Mette Ebbesen (2008). The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development. Nanoethics 2 (3):333-333.score: 129.0
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created (...)
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  6. Nancy L. Jones (2007). A Code of Ethics for the Life Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):25-43.score: 123.0
    The activities of the life sciences are essential to provide solutions for the future, for both individuals and society. Society has demanded growing accountability from the scientific community as implications of life science research rise in influence and there are concerns about the credibility, integrity and motives of science. While the scientific community has responded to concerns about its integrity in part by initiating training in research integrity and the responsible conduct of research, this approach is minimal. The scientific (...)
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  7. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 121.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that (...)
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  8. Zachary M. Schrag (2011). The Case Against Ethics Review in the Social Sciences. Research Ethics 7 (4):120-131.score: 119.0
    For decades, scholars in the social sciences and humanities have questioned the appropriateness and utility of prior review of their research by human subjects' ethics committees. This essay seeks to organize thematically some of their published complaints and to serve as a brief restatement of the major critiques of ethics review. In particular, it argues that 1) ethics committees impose silly restrictions, 2) ethics review is a solution in search of a problem, 3) (...) committees lack expertise, 4) ethics committees apply inappropriate principles, 5) ethics review harms the innocent, and 6) better options exist. (shrink)
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  9. Debora Diniz (2008). Research Ethics in Social Sciences: The Severina's Story Documentary. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):23 - 35.score: 116.0
    In Brazil, social science research ethics is a field still under construction and subject to intense dispute. The aim of this paper is to discuss how accepted principles of biomedical research ethics can be incorporated into the ethical review of social sciences, particularly open interviews, ethnographic research, and participant observation. The paper uses a case study—the ethnographic documentary "Severina's Story"—as the basis for analysis of the methodological and ethical issues raised in social science research. (...)
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  10. Gérald Berthoud & Beat Sitter-Liver (eds.) (1996). The Responsible Scholar: Ethical Considerations in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Watson Pub. International.score: 115.0
  11. J. A. Barnes (1977). The Ethics of Inquiry in Social Science: Three Lectures. Oxford University Press.score: 111.0
  12. Jimmy Lee Shaw (1985). Ethics, Science and Value Judgments: A Critique of Ethical Issues Within the Methodology of Social Research. Journal of Social Studies Research 9 (1):41-52.score: 109.3
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  13. Maxine Robertson (2014). The Case for Ethics Review in the Social Sciences: Drawing From Practice at Queen Mary University of London. Research Ethics 10 (2):69-76.score: 107.7
    This article responds directly to an article published in Research Ethics in 2011 where Schrag argued against ethics review for social science and humanities research. He argued that review committees offer solutions in search of a problem, impose silly restrictions and apply inappropriate principles. He suggests that review committees typically lack appropriate expertise and argued that the process harms the innocent. This article refutes these claims and offers a case study of the ethical review process at Queen (...)
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  14. Dieter Birnbacher (1999). Ethics and Social Science: Which Kind of Co-Operation? [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):319-336.score: 107.0
    The relation between ethics and social science is often conceived as complementary, both disciplines cooperating in the solution of concrete moral problems. Against this, the paper argues that not only applied ethics but even certain parts of general ethics have to incorporate sociological and psychological data and theories from the start. Applied ethics depends on social science in order to asses the impact of its own principles on the concrete realities which these principles are (...)
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  15. Tom Børsen, Avan N. Antia & Mirjam Sophia Glessmer (2013). A Case Study of Teaching Social Responsibility to Doctoral Students in the Climate Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1491-1504.score: 107.0
    The need to make young scientists aware of their social responsibilities is widely acknowledged, although the question of how to actually do it has so far gained limited attention. A 2-day workshop entitled “Prepared for social responsibility?” attended by doctoral students from multiple disciplines in climate science, was targeted at the perceived needs of the participants and employed a format that took them through three stages of ethics education: sensitization, information and empowerment. The workshop aimed at preparing (...)
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  16. Klaus Hoeyer (2006). Ethics Wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism Between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):203 - 227.score: 106.0
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists (...)
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  17. David K. Lewis (2000). Papers in Ethics and Social Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 106.0
    This volume is devoted to Lewis's work in ethics and social philosophy. Topics covered include the logic of obligation and permission; decision theory and its relation to the idea that beliefs might play the motivating role of desires; a subjectivist analysis of value; dilemmas in virtue ethics; the problem of evil; problems about self-prediction; social coordination, linguistic and otherwise; alleged duties to rescue distant strangers; toleration as a tacit treaty; nuclear warfare; and punishment. This collection, and (...)
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  18. Dana Cook Grossman & Heinz Valtin (eds.) (1999). Great Issues for Medicine in the Twenty-First Century: Ethical and Social Issues Arising Out of Advances in the Biomedical Sciences. New York Academy of Sciences.score: 105.0
     
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  19. Stephen L. Payne (2000). Challenges for Research Ethics and Moral Knowledge Construction in the Applied Social Sciences. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):307 - 318.score: 104.0
    Certain critical accounts of conventional research practices in business and the social sciences are explored in this essay. These accounts derive from alternative social paradigms and their underlying assumptions about appropriate social inquiry and knowledge construction. Among these alternative social paradigms, metatheories, mindscapes, or worldviews are social constructionist, critical, feminist, and postmodern or poststructural thinking. Individuals with these assumptions and values for knowledge construction are increasingly challenging conventional scholarship in what has been referred to (...)
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  20. Martin Bulmer (ed.) (1982). Social Research Ethics: An Examination of the Merits of Covert Participant Observation. Holmes & Meier Publishers.score: 100.0
  21. Clarke E. Cochran (ed.) (1999). The Nature of Moral Inquiry in the Social Sciences: Essays. Erasmus Institute.score: 100.0
  22. Jacques Rueff (1929). From the Physical to the Social Sciences. London, H. Milford, Oxford University Press.score: 100.0
     
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  23. Adam M. Hedgecoe (2001). Ethical Boundary Work: Geneticization, Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):305-309.score: 99.0
    This paper is a response to Henk ten Have's Genetics and Culture: The Geneticization thesis . In it, I refute Ten Have's suggestion that geneticization is not the sort of process that can be measured and commented on in terms of empirical evidence,even if he is correct in suggesting that it should be seen as part of ‘philosophical discourse’. At the end, I relate this discussion to broader debates within bioethics between the social science and philosophy, and suggest the (...)
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  24. Sonja Grover (2004). What's Human Rights Got to Do with It? On the Proposed Changes to SSHRC Ethics Research Policy. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (3):249-262.score: 99.0
    Whats human rights got to do with it? That is, whats human rights got to do with the June 2004 report of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Ethics Special Working Committee to the Inter-Agency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics. The disturbing answer is not enough. Certain key recommendations of the working committee, it is suggested, would unacceptably weaken the researchers legal and moral accountability to research participants. Those particular recommendations rely on misguided references to academic (...)
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  25. Gopal Guru (2012). Egalitarianism and the Social Sciences in India. In , The Cracked Mirror: An Indian Debate on Experience and Theory. Oxford.score: 95.0
    This volume explores the relationship between experience and theory in Indian social sciences in the form of a dialogue. It focuses on questions of Dalit experience and untouchability. While Gopal Guru argues that only those who have lived lives as subalterns can represent them accurately, Sundar Sarukkai feels that people located outside the community can also represent them. Thematically divided into five sections, the first discusses the problems associated with theory in the social sciences in the (...)
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  26. Bert Molewijk, Anne M. Stiggelbout, Wilma Otten, Heleen M. Dupuis & Job Kievit (2004). Scientific Contribution. Empirical Data and Moral Theory. A Plea for Integrated Empirical Ethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (1):55-69.score: 94.0
    Ethicists differ considerably in their reasons for using empirical data. This paper presents a brief overview of four traditional approaches to the use of empirical data: “the prescriptive applied ethicists,” “the theorists,” “the critical applied ethicists,” and “the particularists.” The main aim of this paper is to introduce a fifth approach of more recent date (i.e. “integrated empirical ethics”) and to offer some methodological directives for research in integrated empirical ethics. All five approaches are presented in a table (...)
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  27. Robert T. Bower (1978). Ethics in Social Research: Protecting the Interests of Human Subjects. Praeger Publishers.score: 94.0
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  28. Dena Plemmons (2012). Challenges for Research Ethics Education in the Social Sciences. Teaching Ethics 12 (2):145-147.score: 90.0
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  29. Kieran Keohane (1993). Central Problems in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences After Postmodernism: Reconciling Consensus and Hegemonic Theories of Epistemology and Political Ethics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 19 (2):145-169.score: 90.0
  30. Douglas Adams (2012). The Issues and Challenges of Research Ethics Education in the University, Particularly in the Area of the Social Sciences. Teaching Ethics 12 (2):141-144.score: 90.0
  31. Anthony Colombo (2008). Models of Mental Disorder : How Philosophy and the Social Sciences Can Illuminate Psychiatric Ethics. In Guy Widdershoven (ed.), Empirical Ethics in Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. 69--94.score: 90.0
  32. Nathan Emmerich (2013). Between the Accountable and the Auditable: Ethics and Ethical Governance in the Social Sciences. Research Ethics 9 (4):175-186.score: 90.0
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  33. S. Holm & L. Irving (2004). Research Ethics Committees in the Social Sciences. In Kimberly Kempf-Leonard (ed.), Encyclopedia of Social Measurement. Elsevier. 397--402.score: 90.0
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  34. J. Lewis & C. Roberts (2009). Ethics in Social Science: Regulation, Review or Scrutiny?: Report of a Conference on 11 May 2009 Organized Jointly by the Social Research Association and the Academy of Social Sciences. [REVIEW] Research Ethics 5 (3):117-119.score: 90.0
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  35. J. Lewis (2010). Ethics Principles for Social Science Research: Report of a Meeting on 22 March 2010 Jointly Sponsored by AREC, the Social Research Association and the Academy of Social Sciences. [REVIEW] Research Ethics 6 (2):56-57.score: 90.0
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  36. Tim Bond (2012). Ethical Imperialism or Ethical Mindfulness? Rethinking Ethical Review for Social Sciences. Research Ethics 8 (2):97-112.score: 89.0
    This article is a response to the challenge with which Zachary Schrag concluded his article, ‘The case against ethics review in social sciences’ − that ‘the burden of proof for its continuation rests on its defenders’ (Schrag, 2011). This article acknowledges that there is substance in the charges he lays against some reviews of social sciences and that these are of sufficient quantity and seriousness to justify his challenge. Instead of favouring abandonment of ethical review (...)
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  37. Christine Clavien (forthcoming). Evolution, Society, and Ethics: Social Darwinism Versus Evolutionary Ethics. In Thomas Heams (ed.), Handbook of Evolutionary Biology (provis. Title). Springer.score: 87.0
    Evolutionary ethics (EE) is a branch of philosophy that arouses both fascination and deep suspicion. It claims that Darwinian mechanisms and evolutionary data on animal sociality are relevant to ethical reflection. This field of study is often misunderstood and rarely fails to conjure up images of Social Darwinism as a vector for nasty ideologies and policies. However, it is worth resisting the temptation to reduce EE to Social Darwinism and developing an objective analysis of whether it is (...)
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  38. Denis Phan & Franck Varenne (2010). Agent-Based Models and Simulations in Economics and Social Sciences: From Conceptual Exploration to Distinct Ways of Experimenting. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 13 (1).score: 87.0
    Now that complex Agent-Based Models and computer simulations spread over economics and social sciences - as in most sciences of complex systems -, epistemological puzzles (re)emerge. We introduce new epistemological concepts so as to show to what extent authors are right when they focus on some empirical, instrumental or conceptual significance of their model or simulation. By distinguishing between models and simulations, between types of models, between types of computer simulations and between types of empiricity obtained through (...)
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  39. Erica Haimes (2002). What Can the Social Sciences Contribute to the Study of Ethics? Theoretical, Empirical and Substantive Considerations. Bioethics 16 (2):89–113.score: 87.0
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  40. Alasdair MacIntyre (1981). The Teaching of Ethics in the Social Sciences. Teaching Philosophy 4 (2):170-171.score: 87.0
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  41. John A. Clark (1956). Ethics and the Social Sciences. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (23):121-135.score: 87.0
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  42. G. D. Bouma & Kristin Diemer (1996). Human Ethics Review and Social Sciences: Several Emerging Ethical Issues. Monash Bioethics Review 15 (1).score: 87.0
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  43. J. L. Abreu & M. H. Badii (2007). La conciencia cuántica como enfoque de estudio de la ética y de las ciencias sociales: Una nueva propuesta de investigación científica para las universidades (The quantum consciousness as an approach to study ethics and social sciences: A new proposal of scientific research for universities). Daena: International Journal of Good Conscience 2 (2):1-25.score: 87.0
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  44. Ronald Commers (1979). Thomas Hobbes and the Idea of Mechanics in Social Sciences and Ethics. Some Preliminaries in the History of the Idea of Mechanics. Philosophica 24.score: 87.0
  45. Donald P. Warwick (1977). Social Sciences and Ethics. Hastings Center Report 7 (6):8-10.score: 87.0
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  46. Patricia M. L. Illingworth (2011). Us Before Me: Ethics and Social Capital for Global Well-Being. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 85.3
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Overcoming Indifference -- Social Capital -- Ethics for Enduring Social Capital -- Social Capital and Happiness -- Social Capital and Law -- Giving Back -- Global People -- Bibliography -- Index.
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  47. Sean Jennings (2012). Response to Schrag: What Are Ethics Committees for Anyway? A Defence of Social Science Research Ethics Review. Research Ethics 8 (2):87-96.score: 85.3
    Zachary Schrag would like to put the burden of proof for continuation of research ethics review in the Social Sciences on those who advocate for research ethics committees (RECs), and asks that we take the concerns that he raises seriously. I separate his concerns into a principled issue and a number of pragmatic issues. The principled issue concerns the justification for having research ethics committees; the pragmatic issues concern questions such as the effectiveness of review (...)
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  48. Michael Davis (2001). The Professional Approach to Engineering Ethics: Five Research Questions. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):379-390.score: 85.0
    This paper argues that research for engineering ethics should routinely involve philosophers, social scientists, and engineers, and should focus for now on certain basic questions such as: Who is an engineer? What is engineering? What do engineers do? How do they make decisions? And how much control do they actually have over what they do?
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  49. Michael Davis (2006). Engineering Ethics, Individuals, and Organizations. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):223-231.score: 85.0
    This article evaluates a family of criticism of how engineering ethics is now generally taught. The short version of the criticism might be put this way: Teachers of engineering ethics devote too much time to individual decisions and not enough time to social context. There are at least six version of this criticism, each corresponding to a specific subject omitted. Teachers of engineering ethics do not (it is said) teach enough about: 1) the culture of organizations; (...)
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  50. Stuart G. Nicholls, Jamie Brehaut & Raphae Saginur (2012). Social Science and Ethics Review: A Question of Practice Not Principle. Research Ethics 8 (2):71-78.score: 85.0
    In his article ‘The case against ethics review in the social sciences’, Schrag asserts that the social sciences should not be subject to ethical review. He recounts a number of examples where ethical review has seemingly failed. He further suggests some alternative models for dealing with ethical review in the social sciences. Finally, he concludes, and we concur, that there is a lack of empirical evidence as to the benefit of research ethics (...)
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