Search results for 'Social values in literature' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Fernanda Duarte (2010). Working with Corporate Social Responsibility in Brazilian Companies: The Role of Managers' Values in the Maintenance of CSR Cultures. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):355 - 368.score: 630.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) refers to the duty of management to consider and respond to issues beyond the organization's economic and legal requirements in line with social and environmental values. However, 'management' is constituted by real people responsible for routine decisions and formulation and implementation of policies. It can be said therefore that the ethical ideals and beliefs of these individuals - in particular their personal values - play an important role in their decisions. It is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stavroula Tsirogianni & George Gaskell (2011). The Role of Plurality and Context in Social Values. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (4):441-465.score: 552.0
    The study of social values has its origins in the study of both cross cultural and within cultural differences in latent or manifest definitions of the right social order to achieve the good life. To this extent, the social scientific literature is replete with references to them. Yet, researchers either use the term values Social values are often used interchangeably with that of attitudes or treated as a post-hoc explanatory concept. When (...) are the focal research point, such endeavours predominantly depart from universal and reductionist understandings of their functions, meanings and structures. Through tracing the roots of key theoretical and empirical investigations in values, originating in the work of Charles Morris, Gordon Allport, Florence Kluckhohn and Fred Strodtbeck, Milton Rokeach and Shalom Schwartz, we reveal the common as well as the different tenets underpinning their work. It will be shown that these accounts have lost sight of the importance of plurality and context. We claim that a renewed program of research in values is needed, which should be characterised by methodological pluralism in order to investigate a) value plurality, b) value specificity and c) values as properties and as processes. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Patrick Grant (1992). Literature and Personal Values. St. Martin's Press.score: 552.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Pieter van Beurden & Tobias Gössling (2008). The Worth of Values – a Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):407-424.score: 546.0
    One of the older questions in the debate about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is whether it is worthwhile for organizations to pay attention to societal demands. This debate was emotionally, normatively, and ideologically loaded. Up to the present, this question has been an important trigger for empirical research in CSR. However, the answer to the question has apparently not been found yet, at least that is what many researchers state. This apparent ambivalence in CSR consequences invites a literature (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kieran Egan & Gillian Judson (2009). Values and Imagination in Teaching: With a Special Focus on Social Studies. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):126-140.score: 528.0
    Both local and global issues are typically dealt with in the Social Studies curriculum, or in curriculum areas with other names but similar intents. In the literature about Social Studies the imagination has played little role, and consequently it hardly appears in texts designed to help teachers plan and implement Social Studies lessons. What is true of Social Studies is also largely reflected in general texts concerning planning teaching. Clearly many theorists and practitioners are concerned (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Bradley J. Sleeper, Kenneth C. Schneider, Paula S. Weber & James E. Weber (2006). Scale and Study of Student Attitudes Toward Business Education's Role in Addressing Social Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):381 - 391.score: 480.0
    Corporations and investors are responding to recent major ethical scandals with increased attention to the social impacts of business operations. In turn, business colleges and their international accrediting body are increasing their efforts to make students more aware of the social context of corporate activity. Business education literature lacks data on student attitudes toward such education. This study found that post-scandal business students, particularly women, are indeed interested in it. Their interest is positively related to their past (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. K. Gregory Jin, Ronald Drozdenko & Sara DeLoughy (2013). The Role of Corporate Value Clusters in Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Performance: A Study of Financial Professionals and Implications for the Financial Meltdown. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):15-24.score: 444.0
    This article delves into a potential mindset that may be responsible for the recent financial meltdown. Research relating to this mindset from different perspectives is reviewed. The findings from this literature review are used to create a conceptual framework for the empirical, ethical, and corporate social responsibility study of financial professionals. Data were collected from a survey of the professional membership of a large national association of financial professionals. This article reports the results of the analysis of data (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Christine A. Hemingway (2005). Personal Values As a Catalyst for Corporate Social Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):233-249.score: 438.0
    The literature acknowledges a distinction

    between immoral, amoral and moral management. This

    paper makes a case for the employee (at any level) as a

    moral agent, even though the paper begins by highlighting

    a body of evidence which suggests that individual

    moral agency is sacrificed at work and is

    compromised in deference to other pressures. This leads

    to a discussion about the notion of discretion and an

    examination of a separate, contrary body of literature

    which indicates that some individuals in corporations

    may use their discretion to behave in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christine Hemingway (2005). Personal Values As a Catalyst for Corporate Social Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):233-249.score: 438.0
    The literature acknowledges a distinction between immoral, amoral and moral management. This paper makes a case for the employee (at any level) as a moral agent, even though the paper begins by highlighting a body of evidence which suggests that individual moral agency is sacrificed at work and is compromised in deference to other pressures. This leads to a discussion about the notion of discretion and an examination of a separate, contrary body of literature which indicates that some (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Chris Beckett (2005). Values & Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction. Sage.score: 405.0
    In social work there is seldom an uncontroversial `right way' of doing things. So how will you deal with the value questions and ethical dilemmas that you will be faced with as a professional social worker? This lively and readable introductory text is designed to equip students with a sound understanding of the principles of values and ethics which no social worker should be without. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, this book successfully explores the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Marco Tavanti (2013). Before Microfinance: The Social Value of Microsavings in Vincentian Poverty Reduction. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):697-706.score: 402.0
    The purpose of this article is to present and discuss the values and limits of microfinance within the context of poverty reduction, international development, and community empowerment. The main thesis is that microfinance requires a more complex strategy than simply the provision of credits. The development of financial capital depends on the increase in human capacity and social capital. Microfinance is revisited under the ethical lenses of global responsibility for alleviating poverty and developing community sustainability. Through a critical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Richard Paul Janaro (1973). Human Worth. New York,Holt, Rinehart and Winston.score: 396.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Michael S. Carolan (2006). Social Change and the Adoption and Adaptation of Knowledge Claims: Whose Truth Do You Trust in Regard to Sustainable Agriculture? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):325-339.score: 372.0
    This paper examines sustainable agriculture’s steady rise as a legitimate farm management system. In doing this, it offers an account of social change that centers on trust and its intersection with networks of knowledge. The argument to follow is informed by the works of Foucault and Latour but moves beyond this literature in important ways. Guided by and building upon earlier conceptual framework first forwarded by Carolan and Bell (2003, Environmental Values 12: 225–245), sustainable agriculture is examined (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Allan Edward Barsky (2010). Ethics and Values in Social Work: An Integrated Approach for a Comprehensive Curriculum. Oxford University Press.score: 360.0
    In a unique and student-friendly package, Ethics and Values in Social Work offers a series of learning modules that will ensure graduates receive a ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Evelyn Fox Keller (1988). Demarcating Public From Private Values in Evolutionary Discourse. Journal of the History of Biology 21 (2):195 - 211.score: 360.0
    What I suggest we can see in this brief overview of the literature is an extensive interpenetration on both sides of these debates between scientific, political, and social values. Important shifts in political and social values were of course occurring over the same period, some of them in parallel with, and perhaps even contributing to, these transitions I have been speaking of in evolutionary discourse. The developments that I think of as at least suggestive of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Leda Nath, Lori Holder-Webb & Jeffrey Cohen (2013). Will Women Lead the Way? Differences in Demand for Corporate Social Responsibility Information for Investment Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):85-102.score: 360.0
    Recent years have featured a leap in academic and public interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities and related corporate reporting. Two main themes in this literature are the exploration of management incentives to engage in and disclose this information, and of the use and value of this information to market participants. We extend the second theme by examining the interest that specific investor classes have in the use of CSR information. We rely on feminist intersectionality, which suggests (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. John A. Pearce (2013). Using Social Identity Theory to Predict Managers' Emphases on Ethical and Legal Values in Judging Business Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):497-514.score: 360.0
    The need to fill three gaps in ethics research in a business context sparked the current study. First, the distinction between the concepts of “ethical” and “legal” needs to be incorporated into theory building and empiricism. Second, a unifying theory is needed that can explain the variables that influence managers to emphasize ethics and legality in their judgments. Third, empirical evidence is needed to confirm the predictive power of the unifying theory, the discernable influence of personal and organizational variables, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ian Thompson (2000). Sources of Values in the Environmental Design Professions: The Case of Landscape Architecture. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (2):203 – 219.score: 356.0
    This paper presents a framework for understanding the value systems inherent in landscape architectural practice. It is based upon a close analytical reading of the academic and professional literature, supported by a series of in-depth interviews with mid- and late-career British landscape architects. The empirical results of these interviews will be presented in a future paper. A tripartite classification of values is suggested, based upon the categories of the aesthetic, the social and the environmental, each of which (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Scott John Vitell, Encarnación Ramos & Ceri M. Nishihara (2010). The Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility in Organizational Success: A Spanish Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):467 - 483.score: 354.0
    Ethics has assumed a dominant position in the current economic debate, and this study focuses on ethics as a legitimate underpinning to good business decision making. Using a self-response survey of marketing managers in Spain, the current theory on ethical decision making is extended. Results support the mediating influence of the PRESOR construct (an individual’s perception of the importance of ethics and social responsibility for the effectiveness of the organization) on relativistic and idealistic moral thinking when one is considering (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David R. Hiley (1987). Power and Values in Corporate Life. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):343 - 353.score: 354.0
    The role of power and its relation to values has become a topic of growing interest in business ethics as well as in the literature of management and the sociology of organizations. Though there is more interest in the role and potential for abuse of power in corporations, the concept of power drawn from classical political theory and initial behavioral studies of power in organizations is inadequate for understanding the place, complexity and ethics of power in the corporation. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Harry J. van Buren Iii, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Douglas E. Thomas (2006). The Evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility in Mexico. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:173-177.score: 354.0
    This paper begins to explore how corporate social responsibility (CSR) has evolved in Mexico. It looks at Mexico's social and political history to see the values that shaped expectations about how Mexican firms should address the needs and desires of their stakeholders in various periods in the 20th century. Particular attention is given to firms in Monterrey because they pioneered a form of company paternalism that reflected early CSR initiatives. Finally the paper briefly examines some contemporary CSR (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Heather Peters (2008). Theory, Science, Ideology and Ethics in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (2):172-182.score: 354.0
    Social work and other professions struggle with the roles of knowledge and values in the study of society and human lives, and in professional practice. Discussions of this topic range from those who see relatively clear distinctions between these concepts and those for whom the lines between the concepts are blurred. For those who separate theory and knowledge from values and ethics there is further discussion in the literature on which is the appropriate foundation for (...) work practice. The following discussion examines two arguments: firstly, that these concepts, and the two camps they can be placed into, are distinct and should be kept separate; and secondly, the alternative perspective that the concepts overlap and that the separation into two camps is false. The analysis here outlines these perspectives and suggests reasons why shades of both are necessary to fully understand and participate in the reality of social work as a profession and an academic discipline. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Pan Wei (2009). Core Social Values in Contemporary Societies. Diogenes 56 (1):53-73.score: 348.8
    This essay intends to build an analytical tool for understanding social values. It proceeds by defining the term ‘social value’, differentiating ‘core’ and ‘non-core’ social values and discussing their respective functions in society. Then, it extracts from social values a seven-tier system of core social values, built on seven basic social relationships: self–other, man–nature, individual–community, community–society, people–government, people–(state) nation, and (state) nation–world system. The corresponding views of right and wrong on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Fabrice Clément & Daniel Dukes (2013). The Role of Interest in the Transmission of Social Values. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 346.5
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Barbara Pesut, Joan L. Bottorff & Carole A. Robinson (2011). Be Known, Be Available, Be Mutual: A Qualitative Ethical Analysis of Social Values in Rural Palliative Care. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):19-.score: 344.3
    Background: Although attention to healthcare ethics in rural areas has increased, specific focus on rural palliative care is still largely under-studied and under-theorized. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the values informing good palliative care from rural individuals' perspectives. Methods: We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in four rural communities in Western Canada. Each community had a population of 10, 000 or less and was located at least a three hour travelling distance by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Anna-Greta Mamhidir, Mona Kihlgren & Venke Soerlie (2011). Be Known, Be Available, Be Mutual: A Qualitative Ethical Analysis of Social Values in Rural Palliative Care. BMC Medical Ethics (1):19-.score: 344.3
    Background: Although attention to healthcare ethics in rural areas has increased, specific focus on rural palliative care is still largely under-studied and under-theorized. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the values informing good palliative care from rural individuals' perspectives. Methods: We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in four rural communities in Western Canada. Each community had a population of 10, 000 or less and was located at least a three hour travelling distance by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Knut J. Ims, Lars Jacob Tynes Pedersen & Laszlo Zsolnai (2013). How Economic Incentives May Destroy Social, Ecological and Existential Values: The Case of Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics:1-8.score: 344.0
    Executive compensation has long been a prominent topic in the management literature. A main question that is also given substantial attention in the business ethics literature—even more so in the wake of the recent financial crisis—is whether increasing levels of executive compensation can be justified from an ethical point of view. Also, the relationship of executive compensation to instances of unethical behavior or outcomes has received considerable attention. The purpose of this paper is to explore the social, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Peter Lamarque (1994). Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 342.0
    This book examines the complex and varied ways in which fictions relate to the real world, and offers a precise account of how imaginative works of literature can use fictional content to explore matters of universal human interest. While rejecting the traditional view that literature is important for the truths that it imparts, the authors also reject attempts to cut literature off altogether from real human concerns. Their detailed account of fictionality, mimesis, and cognitive value, founded on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jaime Fabregat (2013). Explicit Training in Human Values and Social Attitudes of Future Engineers in Spain. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1551-1556.score: 342.0
    In Spain before the 1990s there was no clear and explicit comprehensive training for future engineers with regard to social responsibility and social commitment. Following the Spanish university curricular reform, which began in the early 1990s, a number of optional subjects became available to students, concerning science, technology and society (STS), international cooperation, the environment and sustainability. The latest redefinition of the Spanish curriculum in line with the Bologna agreements has reduced the number of non-obligatory subjects, but could (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2014). Addressing Problems in Profit-Driven Research: How Can Feminist Conceptions of Objectivity Help? European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (2):135-151.score: 342.0
    Although there is increased recognition of the inevitable--and perhaps sometimes beneficial-- role of values in scientific inquiry, there are also growing concerns about the potential for commercial values to lead to bias. This is particularly evident in biomedical research. There is a concern that conflicts of interest created by commercialization may lead to biased reasoning or methodological choices in testing drugs and medical interventions. In addition, such interests may lead research in directions that are unresponsive to pressing (...) needs, when it is profitable to do so. Feminist philosophy of science seems particularly well situated to provide resources to help address such concerns because this literature has both 1) theorized about how to minimize biases in science, e.g., sexist or androcentric biases, and 2) generated accounts of objectivity that do not require individual scientists to be value-neutral or disinterested. Two such accounts are assessed in relation to concerns about commercial bias: those offered by feminist empiricism and standpoint feminism. We argue that standpoint feminism is more promising because it has resources to address, not just the epistemological, but also the inescapably ethical dimensions of commercial bias. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Dhanpat Raj Bhandari (2008). Role of Education in Cultivation of Values. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 49:31-38.score: 342.0
    The prime concern of education is to evolve the good, the true and the divine in man so as to establish a moral life in the world. It should essentially make a man pious, perfect and truthful. The welfare of humanity lies neither in scientific or technological advancements nor in acquisition of material comforts. The main function of education is to enrich the character. What we need today more than anything else is moral leadership founded on courage, intellectual integrity and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ian Thompson (2000). Aesthetic, Social and Ecological Values in Landscape Architecture: A Discourse Analysis. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):269 – 287.score: 337.5
    This paper presents the results of a qualitative investigation into the ethical and aesthetic values held by late- and mid-career landscape architects in the UK. It identifies the dominant discourses within three value areas, the aesthetic, the social and the environmental. Within the web of value discourses, some are clearly conflicting, while others are compatible or mutually supporting. The most prevalent values are those associated with 'technocentric accommodation'. A 'trivalent' approach to design is advocated which combines (...) from the three main areas. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Brenda E. Joyner & Dinah Payne (2002). Evolution and Implementation: A Study of Values, Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (4):297 - 311.score: 336.0
    There is growing recognition that good ethics can have a positive economic impact on the performance of firms. Many statistics support the premise that ethics, values, integrity and responsibility are required in the modern workplace. For consumer groups and society at large, research has shown that good ethics is good business. This study defines and traces the emergence and evolution within the business literature of the concepts of values, business ethics and corporate social responsibility to illustrate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Paul S. Voakes (1997). Social Influences on Journalists' Decision Making in Ethical Situations. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):18 – 35.score: 336.0
    This study attempts to refine and test a theory of social influences on ethical decisions of journalists. The theoretical model proposes that several social factors influence any given decision, and that a hierarchy of influences assigns relative value to each: individual, small group, organization, competition, occupation, extramedia, and law. Print and broadcast journalists reacted to 3 hypothetical scenarios that raised ethical problems. The journalists then rated the salience of various reasoning statements, each representing 1 of the 7 (...) influences. No single source of ethical guidance appeared; in many cases different influences emerge as powerful under different circumstances. But of the 7 proposed influences, 5 showed consistent strength in predicting the decision the journalist makes. The individual influence was the weakest of the 7, despite its prominent strength in the literature. The organizational and small-group strength suggests company-level strategies for media policy-makers who wish to increase journalists'ethical awareness. Overall, the study seems to challenge a traditional assumption that in ethical dilemmas journalists are autonomous moral agents, acting on the basis of their own values alone. The data support the notion of a far more dynamic and complex pattern of social influences. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Terry L. Besser (2012). The Consequences of Social Responsibility for Small Business Owners in Small Towns. Business Ethics 21 (2):129-139.score: 336.0
    This paper focuses on three under-researched subjects in the corporate social responsibility literature: small businesses, small towns, and consequences of social responsibility for the business owner personally. Small businesses are the vast majority of businesses and make a significant contribution to national economic vitality. Their value to the survival of small towns, where they are often the only businesses, is even more important. Research indicates that the social performance of big and small businesses alike is dependent (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mary-Ellen Boyle (2007). Learning to Neighbor? Service-Learning in Context. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):85-104.score: 330.0
    Service-learning has received a great deal of attention in the management education literature over the past decade, as a method by which students can acquire moral and civic values as well as gain academic knowledge and practice real-world skills. Scholars focus on student and community impact, curricular design, and rationale. However, the educational environment (“context”) in which service-learning occurs has been given less attention, although experienced educators know that the classroom is hardly a vacuum and that students learn (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Rebecca L. Walker & Clair Morrissey (2013). Bioethics Methods in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project Literature. Bioethics 28 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 324.0
    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in genomics. We undertook a qualitative content analysis of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Sarah Banks (2006). Ethics and Values in Social Work. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 310.5
    The third edition of this popular book has been updated to take account of the latest developments in policy and social work practice. It includes new sections on radical/emancipatory and postmodern approaches to ethics, analysis of the latest codes of ethics from over 30 different countries, additional case studies of ethical problems and dilemmas, practical exercises, and annotated further reading lists at the end of each chapter.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Paul M. Gurney & M. Humphreys (2006). Consuming Responsibility: The Search for Value at Laskarina Holidays. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):83 - 100.score: 300.0
    This paper provides an alternative theoretical conceptualisation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in order to further our understanding of prosocial organisational behaviour. We argue that consumption provides a perspective that enables theorists to escape the confines of existing CSR literature. In our view the organisation is re-imagined as an arena of consumption where employees are engaged in a quest for value, constructing and confirming their identities as consumers. Using the award-winning tour operator Laskarina Holidays as an illustrative case, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. M. Carmen Ruiz Jiménez, Manuel Carlos Vallejo Martos & Rocío Martínez Jiménez (2013). Organisational Harmony as a Value in Family Businesses and Its Influence on Performance. Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 300.0
    The aims of this research were twofold: first, to compare the levels of organisational harmony between family and non-family firms and, second, to study the influence of organisational harmony on family firms’ performance (profitability, longevity and group cohesion). Starting from a definition of organisational harmony as a value and considering the importance of the management of organisational values, we use the main topics indicated by the general literature (organisational climate, trust and participation) to analyse organisational harmony, as well (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jamake Highwater (1997). The Mythology of Transgression: Homosexuality as Metaphor. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    Jamake Highwater is a master storyteller and one of our most visionary writers, hailed as "an eloquent bard, whose words are fire and glory" (Studs Terkel) and "a writer of exceptional vision and power" (Ana"is Nin). Author of more than thirty volumes of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, Highwater--considered by many to be the intellectual heir of Joseph Campbell--has long been intrigued by how our mythological legacies have served as a foundation of modern civilization. Now, in The Mythology of Transgression, he (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Reuven Yaron (1995). Greenberg, Jerald. And Ronald L. Cohen (Eds.)-(1992). Equity and Justice in Social Behavior. New York: Academic Press. Irani, KD (1981)." Values and Rights Underlying Social Justice." In RL Braham (Ed.), Social Justice. Boston, Mass.: Martinus Nijhoff. Phillips, Derek.(1986). Toward a Just Social Order. Princeton: Princeton University. [REVIEW] In K. D. Irani & Morris Silver (eds.), Social Justice in the Ancient World. Greenwood Press. 215.score: 297.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Robert Welsh Jordan (2001). Hartmann, Schutz, and the Hermeneutics of Action. Axiomathes 12 (3-4):327-338.score: 294.0
    Hartmann's way of conceiving what he terms "the actual ought-to-be [aktuales Seinsollen]" offers a fruitful approach to crucial issues in the phenomenology of action. The central issue to be dealt with concerns the description of the "constitution" of anticipated possibilities as projects for action. Such potentialities are termed "problematic possibilities" and are contrasted with "open possibilities" in most of the works published by Husserl as well as those published by Alfred Schutz. The description given by Alfred Schutz emphasized that the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robert E. Abrams (2004). Landscape and Ideology in American Renaissance Literature: Topographies of Skepticism. Cambridge University Press.score: 292.5
    Robert Abrams argues that new concepts of space and landscape emerged in mid-nineteenth-century American writing, marking a linguistic and interpretative limit to American expansion. Abrams supports the radical elements of antebellum writing, where writers from Hawthorne to Rebecca Harding Davis disputed the naturalizing discourses of mid-nineteenth century society. Whereas previous critics find in antebellum writing a desire to convert chaos into an affirmative, liberal agenda, Abrams contends that authors of the 1840s and 50s deconstructed more than they constructed.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Patricia L. Smith & Ellwood F. Oakley (1997). Gender-Related Differences in Ethical and Social Values of Business Students: Implications for Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):37-45.score: 292.5
    This study investigated gender-related differences in ethical attitudes of 318 graduate and undergraduate business students. Significant differences were observed in male and female responses to questions concerning ethics in social and personal relationships. No differences were noted for survey items concerning rules-based obligations. Implications for future management are discussed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Julia Simon (2001). Beyond Contractual Morality: Ethics, Law, and Literature in Eighteenth-Century France. University of Rochester Press.score: 292.5
    Beyond Contractual Morality looks at current debates over the meaning of liberalism by reexamining their roots in eighteenth-century texts, which demonstrate ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Patricia L. Smith & I. I. I. Oakley (1997). Gender-Related Differences in Ethical and Social Values of Business Students: Implications for Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):37-45.score: 292.5
    This study investigated gender-related differences in ethical attitudes of 318 graduate and undergraduate business students. Significant differences were observed in male and female responses to questions concerning ethics in social and personal relationships. No differences were noted for survey items concerning rules-based obligations. Implications for future management are discussed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Piotr Lesniewski (2007). Values in Social Structures. An Outline of a Formal Study. In Ewa Czerwińska-Schupp (ed.), Values and Norms in the Age of Globalization. Peter Lang. 1--30.score: 292.5
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000