Search results for 'Social workers Professional ethics' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Why the international market for pharmaceuticals fails & What to Do About It : A. Comparison of Two Alternative Approaches to Global Ethics (2008). Reflecting the Impact of Ethical Theory : Contractarianism, Ethics, and Economics. Christoph Luetge / Civilising the Barbarians? : On the Apparent Necessity of Moral Surpluses; Soeren Buttkereit and Ingo Pies / Social Dilemmas and the Social Contract; Peter Koslowski / Ethical Economy as the Economy of Ethics and as the Ethics of the Market Economy; Ingo Pies and Stefan Hielscher. In Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.), Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 880.0
  2. Chris Beckett (2005). Values & Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction. Sage.score: 846.0
    In social work there is seldom an uncontroversial `right way' of doing things. So how will you deal with the value questions and ethical dilemmas that you will be faced with as a professional social worker? This lively and readable introductory text is designed to equip students with a sound understanding of the principles of values and ethics which no social worker should be without. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, this book successfully explores (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Helen McLaren (2007). Exploring the Ethics of Forewarning: Social Workers, Confidentiality and Potential Child Abuse Disclosures. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (1):22-40.score: 816.0
    This article reports on exploratory research into social workers? perceptions and actions regarding ?forewarning? clients of their child abuse reporting obligations as a limitation of confidentiality at relationship onset. Ethical principles and previous research on forewarning are discussed prior to stating the research methods and presenting findings. Data obtained from South Australian social workers engaged in human service work with adult family members articulate a strong desire to practise in accordance with professional codes of (...). However, the findings suggest that proactive forewarning is extremely infrequent, with minimized forewarning accomplished only in response to client-initiated inquiry and where prior suspicions of child abuse may exist. Generally, discomfort with forewarning was found to result in its avoidance due to concerns about client retention, working in tense relationships and personal uncertainties about client's reactions towards participants. Through the avoidance of forewarning, participants are potentially supporting their own personal feelings and viewpoints more actively than the rights of others. This may correlate with having a private model of professionalism in opposition to a public model, in which relationship parameters are presented honestly and openly to clients when establishing the practice context?a problematic issue for ethical social work. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard Walsh-Bowers, Amy Rossiter & Isaac Prilleltensky (1996). The Personal is the Organizational in the Ethics of Hospital Social Workers. Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):321 – 335.score: 774.0
    Understanding the social context of clinical ethics is vital for making ethical discourse central in professional practice and for preventing harm. In this paper we present findings about clinical ethics from in depth interviews and consultation with 7 members of a hospital social work department. Workers gave different accounts of ethical dilemmas and resources for ethical decision making than did their managers, whereas workers and managers agreed on core-guiding ethical principles and on ideal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christine Grady, Marion Danis, Karen L. Soeken, Patricia O'Donnell, Carol Taylor, Adrienne Farrar & Connie M. Ulrich (2008). Does Ethics Education Influence the Moral Action of Practicing Nurses and Social Workers? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):4 – 11.score: 768.0
    Purpose/methods: This study investigated the relationship between ethics education and training, and the use and usefulness of ethics resources, confidence in moral decisions, and moral action/activism through a survey of practicing nurses and social workers from four United States (US) census regions. Findings: The sample (n = 1215) was primarily Caucasian (83%), female (85%), well educated (57% with a master's degree). no ethics education at all was reported by 14% of study participants (8% of (...) workers had no ethics education, versus 23% of nurses), and only 57% of participants had ethics education in their professional educational program. Those with both professional ethics education and in-service or continuing education were more confident in their moral judgments and more likely to use ethics resources and to take moral action. Social workers had more overall education, more ethics education, and higher confidence and moral action scores, and were more likely to use ethics resources than nurses. Conclusion: Ethics education has a significant positive influence on moral confidence, moral action, and use of ethics resources by nurses and social workers. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Sarah Banks (2004). Ethics, Accountability, and the Social Professions. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 762.0
    This book explores the far-reaching ethical implications of recent changes in the organization and practice of the social professions, including social work, community and youth work. Drawing on moral philosophy, professional ethics and new empirical research, the author explores such questions as: * Can any occupation justifiably claim a special set of ethics? * What is the impact of the new 'ethics of distrust' on the autonomy discretion and creativity of practitioners? * How does (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Allan Edward Barsky (2010). Ethics and Values in Social Work: An Integrated Approach for a Comprehensive Curriculum. Oxford University Press.score: 696.0
    In a unique and student-friendly package, Ethics and Values in Social Work offers a series of learning modules that will ensure graduates receive a ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Sarah Banks (2006). Ethics and Values in Social Work. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 696.0
    The third edition of this popular book has been updated to take account of the latest developments in policy and social work practice. It includes new sections on radical/emancipatory and postmodern approaches to ethics, analysis of the latest codes of ethics from over 30 different countries, additional case studies of ethical problems and dilemmas, practical exercises, and annotated further reading lists at the end of each chapter.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2008). Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657 - 666.score: 675.0
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Cletus S. Brauer (2013). Just Sustainability? Sustainability and Social Justice in Professional Codes of Ethics for Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):875-891.score: 657.0
    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today’s most pressing and important issues, engineering codes of ethics and their paramountcy clause, which contains those values most important to engineering and to what it means to be an engineer, do not yet put either concept on a par with the safety, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lester Parrott (2006). Values and Ethics in Social Work Practice. Learning Matters.score: 648.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Sarah Banks (2009). Ethics in Professional Life: Virtues for Health and Social Care. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 616.5
    The domain of professional ethics -- Virtue, ethics, and professional life -- Virtues, vices, and situations -- Professional wisdom -- Care -- Respectfulness -- Trustworthiness -- Justice -- Courage -- Integrity.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Marshall Fine & Eli Teram (2009). Believers and Skeptics: Where Social Worker Situate Themselves Regarding the Code of Ethics. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):60 – 78.score: 560.0
    Based on individual and focus-group interviews, this article describes how social workers in a variety of settings and geographical areas within Ontario approached ethical issues in their daily practices. Two primary approaches to professional ethics emerge from the data: principle based and virtue based, reflecting the orientation of groups we label believers and skeptics, respectively. The code of ethics appears to be the fulcrum from which our participants swing. The believers show faith in the code (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Morris Llewellyn Cooke (1946). Professional Ethics and Social Change. New York, American Ethical Union.score: 508.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Andrea Ferrero (2006). Professional Ethics in Psychology Facing Disadvantaged Social Conditions in Argentina. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 25 (1/4):81-92.score: 504.0
    General health conditions are related to a great number of factors, including the socio-historical ones. As human beings are part of the social field, personality is also affected by them. Due to this, the main Ethics Codes of psychology, all around the world, remark in their preambles the importance of social responsibility in the practice and training in psychology. Argentina is confronted with several social problems that have severely influenced people’s mental health. In countries like Argentina, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Donald Dickson (2009). When Law and Ethics Collide: Social Control in Child Protective Services. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):264-283.score: 486.0
    Social welfare workers in the protective services field?among them social workers, psychologists, and psychiatrists?are expected to follow the laws of the state in which they practice, but are also bound by their professional code of ethics. Often this does not present a problem, but at times ethical and legal expectations differ. This is particularly problematic where the professionals may be seen as agents of control, reporting possible child abuse, conducting child abuse investigations, inspecting homes, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jon Vegar Hugaas (2010). Evil's Place in the Ethics of Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (3):254-279.score: 486.0
    This article argues that the concept of evil is needed in normative ethics in general as well as in the professional ethics of social work. Attention is drawn to certain shortcomings in the classical theories of normative ethics when it comes to recognizing the profound destructiveness of certain types of acts that exceed the mere ?bad? or ?wrong? applied in the most common theories of moral philosophy. Having established the category of morally evil acts in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Chris L. Clark (1985). Social Work and Social Philosophy: A Guide for Practice. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 468.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Emile Durkheim (1957/1992). Professional Ethics and Civic Morals. Routledge.score: 459.0
    In Professional Ethics and Civic Morals , Emile Durkheim outlined the core of his theory of morality and social rights which was to dominate his work throughout the course of his life. In Durkheim's view, sociology is a science of morals which are objective social facts, and these moral regulations form the basis of individual rights and obligations. This book is crucial to an understanding of Durkheim's sociology because it contains his much-neglected theory of the state (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David T. Ozar (1985). Social Ethics, the Philosophy of Medicine, and Professional Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 456.0
    The social ethics of medicine is the study and ethical analysis of social structures which impact on the provision of health care by physicians. There are many such social structures. Not all these structures are responsive to the influence of physicians as health professionals. But some social structures which impact on health care are prompted by or supported by important preconceptions of medical practice. In this article, three such elements of the philosophy of medicine are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Richard Hugman (2003). Religious Dimensions of the Origins of Professional Social Work and the Possibility of an International Code of Ethics. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 11 (1):37-54.score: 445.5
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Robert F. Scherer (2003). Building Professional Association and Academic Department Social Capital Through Code of Ethics Enhancements. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 11 (2):33-55.score: 445.5
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mahmut Arslan & Alejo José G. Sison (2009). Foreword: Professional Ethics in Business and Social Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):1 -.score: 436.5
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Alan H. Goldman (2001). Larry May, The Socially Responsive Self: Social Theory and Professional Ethics:The Socially Responsive Self: Social Theory and Professional Ethics. Ethics 111 (2):432-435.score: 436.5
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. C. Newell (2002). Furthering Social Responsibility and Professional Ethics: A Response to Eva Cignacco on Midwives and Selective Abortion on the Grounds of Disability. Nursing Ethics 9 (2):191-193.score: 436.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ken McPhail (2007). Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Professional Ethics and Some Thoughts on Social Network Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics Education 4:97-101.score: 436.5
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Annie Pullen-Sansfaçon (2011). Ethics and Conduct in Self-Directed Groupwork: Some Lessons for the Development of a More Ethical Social Work Practice. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):361-379.score: 430.0
    This paper compares and contrasts the impact and the interface of different sets of values held by social care practitioners in their decision-making process with regard to ethical dilemmas. Specifically, it explores some of the fundamental distinctions between self-directed groupworkers and other qualified social workers practising in both statutory and voluntary sectors. The methodology is qualitative and draws upon a Grounded Theory process. In contrasting the contribution of different sets of values in decision making, we found that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Fran Wiles (2010). Blurring Private–Professional Boundaries: Does It Matter? Issues in Researching Social Work Students' Perceptions About Professional Regulation. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):36-51.score: 430.0
    Social work students in England now have to register with the General Social Care Council and ?sign up to? the codes of practice. These specify that social workers must not ?behave in a way, in work or outside work, which would call into question [their] suitability to work in social care services'. This paper describes a small and ongoing piece of doctoral research into social work students' perceptions of professional regulation. The policy context (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. A. Jotkowitz & B. Gesundheit (2008). Comforting Presence: The Role of Nurses and Social Workers in Clinical Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):14 – 15.score: 427.5
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Christine Grady, Marion Danis, Karen Soeken, Patricia O'Donnell, Carol Taylor, Adrienne Farrar & Connie Ulrich (2008). Response to Peer Commentary on “Does Ethics Education Influence the Moral Action of Practicing Nurses and Social Workers?”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):1-2.score: 427.5
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. W. Olaf Stapledon (1930). Ethical Problems, an Introduction to Ethics for Hospital Nurses and Social Workers. By Beatrice Edgell D.Litt., Ph.D. (London: Methuen & Co., Ltd. 1929. Pp X + 149. Price 5s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 5 (18):301-.score: 427.5
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. D. J. Gleeson (2000). Professional Social Workers and Welfare Bureaus: The Origins of Australian Catholic Social Work. Australasian Catholic Record 77 (2):185.score: 427.5
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. William H. Shlaes & Henry R. Moody (1998). The Socially Responsive Self: Social Theory and Professional Ethics. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (3):452.score: 427.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel E. Wueste (1994). Professional Ethics and Social Responsibility. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 427.5
    Focusing on politics, law, engineering, medicine and science, the contributors to this book aim to cast fresh light on familiar ethical quandaries, and to direct attention to new areas of concern, particularly the institutional setting of ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. K. Gregory Jin, Ronald Drozdenko & Sara DeLoughy (2013). The Role of Corporate Value Clusters in Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Performance: A Study of Financial Professionals and Implications for the Financial Meltdown. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):15-24.score: 417.0
    This article delves into a potential mindset that may be responsible for the recent financial meltdown. Research relating to this mindset from different perspectives is reviewed. The findings from this literature review are used to create a conceptual framework for the empirical, ethical, and corporate social responsibility study of financial professionals. Data were collected from a survey of the professional membership of a large national association of financial professionals. This article reports the results of the analysis of data (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David K. McGraw (2004). A Social Contract Theory Critique of Professional Codes of Ethics. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 2 (4):235-243.score: 414.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. T. Stammers (2009). Book Review: Banks S, Gallagher A 2008: Ethics in Professional Life: Virtues for Health and Social Care. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 267 Pp. GBP18.99 (PB) ISBN 978 0 230 507197. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 16 (5):671-672.score: 414.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kirsi Juhila & Suvi Raitakari (2010). Ethics in Professional Interaction: Justifying the Limits of Helping in a Supported Housing Unit. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (1):57-71.score: 396.0
    This paper studies the construction of ethics in interactions between professionals in meetings, in relation to the rationing of resources. The research context is a supported housing unit targeted at clients with mental health and substance abuse problems. The service is provided for a municipality, which expects good progress of the clients. The research question is: how do the professionals produce implicit ethical justifications for setting limits to helping, even though the need for professional help is not called (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jim Campbell & Gavin Davidson (2009). Coercion in the Community: A Situated Approach to the Examination of Ethical Challenges for Mental Health Social Workers. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):249-263.score: 369.0
    Increasingly, mental health social workers in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in the world are employing coercive interventions with clients. This paper explores this trend in the context of community-based settings, using national and international research literature on this subject. It begins with a discussion about the complex, contested nature of ideas on coercion. The authors then explore debates about how coercion is perceived and applied in practice. They choose two forms of coercion?informal types of leverage, and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Frederic G. Reamer (2012). The Digital and Electronic Revolution in Social Work: Rethinking the Meaning of Ethical Practice. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):1-18.score: 366.0
    The recent and dramatic emergence of digital and other electronic technology in social work?such as online counseling, video counseling, avatar therapy, and e-mail therapy?has tested and challenged the profession's longstanding and widely accepted perspectives on the nature of both clinical relationships and core ethics concepts. These developments have transformed key elements of social work practice and require critical examination of the meaning and application of relevant ethical concepts in diverse cultures. This article explores pertinent ethical implications related (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Malcolm Carey (2007). Some Ethical Dilemmas for Agency Social Workers. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):342-347.score: 364.5
    This article considers some ethical consequences which are linked to the more recent rapid expansion in contingency social work. It is noted that increased privatisation within state social work has led to a much greater reliance upon flexible labour. Consequentially, the relationship between temporary workers and clients has altered, and new beliefs and attitudes have formed amongst some employees who lack permanency. With reference to Nietzsche, Marx and Hobbes, it is suggested that if this political process of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Preston Stovall (2011). Professional Virtue and Professional Self-Awareness: A Case Study in Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):109-132.score: 355.5
    This paper articulates an Aristotelian theory of professional virtue and provides an application of that theory to the subject of engineering ethics. The leading idea is that Aristotle’s analysis of the definitive function of human beings, and of the virtues humans require to fulfill that function, can serve as a model for an analysis of the definitive function or social role of a profession and thus of the virtues professionals must exhibit to fulfill that role. Special attention (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Martin Bulmer (ed.) (1982). Social Research Ethics: An Examination of the Merits of Covert Participant Observation. Holmes & Meier Publishers.score: 355.5
  44. H. Draper, T. Sorell, J. Ives, S. Damery, S. Greenfield, J. Parry, J. Petts & S. Wilson (2010). Non-Professional Healthcare Workers and Ethical Obligations to Work During Pandemic Influenza. Public Health Ethics 3 (1):23-34.score: 352.5
    Most academic papers on ethics in pandemics concentrate on the duties of healthcare professionals. This paper will consider non-professional healthcare workers: do they have a moral obligation to work during an influenza pandemic? If so, is this an obligation that outweighs others they might have, e.g., as parents, and should such an obligation be backed up by the coercive power of law? This paper considers whether non-professional healthcare workers—porters, domestic service workers, catering staff, clerks, (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. K. Gregory Jin & Ronald G. Drozdenko (2010). Relationships Among Perceived Organizational Core Values, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethics, and Organizational Performance Outcomes: An Empirical Study of Information Technology Professionals. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):341 - 359.score: 351.0
    This study is an extension of our recent ethics research in direct marketing (2003) and information technology (2007). In this study, we investigated the relationships among core organizational values, organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and organizational performance outcome. Our analysis of online survey responses from a sample of IT professionals in the United States indicated that managers from organizations with organic core values reported a higher level of social responsibility relative to managers in organizations with mechanistic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bruce R. Gaumnitz & John C. Lere (2002). Contents of Codes of Ethics of Professional Business Organizations in the United States. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):35 - 49.score: 351.0
    This paper reports an analysis of the content of the codes of ethics of 15 professional business organizations in the United States, representing the broad range of disciplines found in business. The analysis was conducted to identify common ethical issues faced by business professionals. It was also structured to highlight ethical issues that are either unique to or of particular importance for business professionals. No attempt is made to make value judgments about either the codes of ethics (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Joseph R. Herkert (2001). Future Directions in Engineering Ethics Research: Microethics, Macroethics and the Role of Professional Societies. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):403-414.score: 346.5
    Three frames of reference for engineering ethics are discussed—individual, professional and social—which can be further broken down into “microethics” concerned with individuals and the internal relations of the engineering profession and “macroethics” referring to the collective social responsibility of the engineering profession and to societal decisions about technology. Few attempts have been made at integrating microethical and macroethical approaches to engineering ethics. The approach suggested here is to focus on the role of professional engineering (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. George DeMartino (2010). The Economist's Oath: On the Need for and Content of Professional Economic Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 334.5
    "I do solemnly swear" -- Economics in practice : what do economists do? -- Ethical challenges confronting the applied economist -- Historical perspective : "don't predict the interest rate!" -- Interpreting the silence : the economic case against professional economic ethics -- The economic case against professional economic ethics : a rebuttal -- The positive case for professional economic ethics -- Learning from others : ethical thought across the professions -- Economists as social (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Hela Sheth & Kathy M. Babiak (2010). Beyond the Game: Perceptions and Practices of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Professional Sport Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):433 - 450.score: 312.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an area of great interest, yet little is known about how CSR is perceived and practiced in the professional sport industry. This study employs a mixed-methods approach, including a survey, and a qualitative content analysis of responses to open-ended questions, to explore how professional sport executives define CSR, and what priorities teams have regarding their CSR activities. Findings from this study indicate that sport executives placed different emphases on elements of CSR including (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Frans Jacobs (2005). Reasonable Partiality in Professional Ethics: The Moral Division of Labour. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):141 - 154.score: 309.0
    Attention is given to a background idea that is often invoked in discussions about reasonable partiality: the idea of a moral division of labour. It is not only a right, but also a duty for professionals to attend (almost) exclusively to the interests of their own clients, because their partial activities are part of an impartial scheme providing for an allocation of professional help to all clients. To clarify that idea, a difference is made between two kinds of division (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000