Search results for 'Socioeconomic Factors' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Abbas Bhuiya, Bogdan Wojtyniak & Rezaul Karim (1989). Malnutrition and Child Mortality: Are Socioeconomic Factors Important? Journal of Biosocial Science 21 (3):357-364.score: 150.0
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  2. W. G. F. Groenewold & M. Tilahun (1990). Anthropometric Indicators of Nutritional Status, Socioeconomic Factors and Mortality in Hospitalized Children in Addis Ababa. Journal of Biosocial Science 22 (3):373-379.score: 150.0
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  3. Y. Motohashi (1991). Effects of Socioeconomic Factors on Secular Trends in Suicide in Japan, 1953–86. Journal of Biosocial Science 23 (2):221-227.score: 150.0
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  4. Eiichi Uchida, Shunichi Araki & Katsuyuki Murata (1992). Socioeconomic Factors Affecting the Longevity of the Japanese Population: A Study for 1980 and 1985. Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (4):497-504.score: 150.0
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  5. Alok Bhargava, Aravinda M. Guntupalli & Michael Lokshin (2011). Health Care Utilization, Socioeconomic Factors and Child Health in India. Journal of Biosocial Science 43 (6):701-715.score: 150.0
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  6. Israel S. L. Sembajwe (1983). Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Mortality in Rural Tanzania. Journal of Biosocial Science 15 (4).score: 150.0
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  7. Hassan Y. Aly (1990). Demographic and Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Infant Mortality in Egypt. Journal of Biosocial Science 22 (4).score: 150.0
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  8. G. Groenwold & M. Tilahuan (1990). Anthropometric Indicators of Nutritional Status, Socioeconomic Factors, and Mortality in Hospitalized Children in Addis Abba. Journal of Biosocial Science 22:373-79.score: 150.0
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  9. Che-Fu Lee & Ruhul Amin (1981). Socioeconomic Factors, Intermediate Variables and Fertility in Bangladesh. Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (2).score: 150.0
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  10. M. Mohsin, S. R. Nath & A. M. R. Chowdhury (1996). Influence of Socioeconomic Factors on Basic Competencies of Children in Bangladesh. Journal of Biosocial Science 28 (1):15-24.score: 150.0
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  11. Eiichi Uchida, Shunichi Araki & Katsuyuki Murata (1993). Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Marriage, Divorce and Birth Rates in a Japanese Population. Journal of Biosocial Science 25 (4):499-507.score: 150.0
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  12. S. E. Mock & S. M. Arai (2009). Childhood Trauma and Chronic Illness in Adulthood: Mental Health and Socioeconomic Status as Explanatory Factors and Buffers. Frontiers in Psychology 1:246-246.score: 144.0
    Experiences of traumatic events in childhood have been shown to have long-term consequences for health in adulthood. With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey we take a life course perspective of cumulative disadvantage and examine the potential role of mental health and socioeconomic status in adulthood as multiple mediators of the link between childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood. Mental health and socioeconomic status are also tested as buffers against the typically adverse consequences of childhood (...)
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  13. Bang Nguyen Pham, Timothy Adair & Peter S. Hill (2010). Maternal Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors Associated with the Sex Ratio at Birth in Vietnam. Journal of Biosocial Science 42 (6):757-772.score: 126.0
    In recent years Vietnam has experienced a high sex ratio at birth SRB) amidst rapid socioeconomic and demographic changes. However, little is known about the differentials in SRB between maternal socioeconomic and demographic groups. The paper uses data from the annual Population Change Survey (PCS) in 2006 to examine the relationship of the sex ratio of the most recent birth with maternal socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and the number of previous female births. The SRB of Vietnam was (...)
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  14. Vania M. R. Marins, Rmvr Almeida, Rosangela A. Pereira & Roseli Sichieri (2007). The Association Between Socioeconomic Indicators and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (2):221.score: 120.0
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  15. Sang-mi Park, Soong-Nang Jang & Dong-Hyun Kim (2010). Gender Differences as Factors in Successful Ageing: A Focus on Socioeconomic Status. Journal of Biosocial Science 42 (1):99.score: 120.0
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  16. W. I. De Silva (1992). Relationships of Desire for No More Children and Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors in Sri Lankan Women. Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (2):185-99.score: 120.0
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  17. Kevin J. Flannelly & Malcolm S. McLeod (1989). A Multivariate Analysis of Socioeconomic and Attitudinal Factors Predicting Commuters' Mode of Travel. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (1):64-66.score: 120.0
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  18. S. Lourdusamy (1990). Religious Fundamentalism as Political Weapon-Socioeconomic and Political Factors. Journal of Dharma 15 (2):125-134.score: 120.0
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  19. Vania M. R. Marins, Renan M. V. R. Almeida, Rosangela A. Pereira & Roseli Sichieri (2007). The Association Between Socioeconomic Indicators and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (2):221-229.score: 120.0
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  20. Joyce N. Mumah & Douglas Jackson-Smith (2013). Do the Factors Associated with Female Hiv Infection Vary by Socioeconomic Status in Cameroon? Journal of Biosocial Science:1-18.score: 120.0
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  21. Jennifer Hollowell, Mike P. W. Grocott, Rebecca Hardy, Fares S. Haddad, Monty G. Mythen & Rosalind Raine (2010). Major Elective Joint Replacement Surgery: Socioeconomic Variations in Surgical Risk, Postoperative Morbidity and Length of Stay. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):529-538.score: 90.0
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  22. Jeffrey R. Cohen, Laurie W. Pant & David J. Sharp (1992). Cultural and Socioeconomic Constraints on International Codes of Ethics: Lessons From Accounting. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (9):687 - 700.score: 60.0
    This paper provides a framework for the examination of cultural and socioeconomic factors that could impede the acceptance and implementation of a profession's international code of conduct. We apply it to the Guidelines on Ethics for Professional Accountants issued by the International Federation of Accountants (1990). To examine the cultural effects, we use Hofstede's (1980a) four work-related values: power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism, and masculinity. The socioeconomic factors are the level of development of the profession and (...)
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  23. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.score: 60.0
    : There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. (...)
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  24. Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner (ed.) (2009). Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This volume investigates human genetic biobanking and its regulation in various Asian countries and areas, including Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, ...
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  25. Allen E. Buchanan (1995). Equal Opportunity and Genetic Intervention. Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):105 - 35.score: 60.0
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  26. K. Baeroe & B. Bringedal (2011). Just Health: On the Conditions for Acceptable and Unacceptable Priority Settings with Respect to Patients' Socioeconomic Status. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):526-529.score: 60.0
    It is well documented that the higher the socioeconomic status (SES) of patients, the better their health and life expectancy. SES also influences the use of health services—the higher the patients' SES, the more time and specialised health services provided. This leads to the following question: should clinicians give priority to individual patients with low SES in order to enhance health equity? Some argue that equity is best preserved by physicians who remain loyal to ‘ordinary medical fairness’ in non-ideal (...)
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  27. Camilla K. Gilmore, Shannon E. McCarthy & Elizabeth S. Spelke (2010). Non-Symbolic Arithmetic Abilities and Achievement in the First Year of Formal Schooling in Mathematics. Cognition 115 (3):394.score: 60.0
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  28. C. Cruz (1997). [Sexual and Reproductive Health. Development and Cooperation]. Dialogos 30.score: 60.0
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  29. [deleted]Mark M. Kishiyama Rajeev D. S. Raizada (2010). Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Brain Development, and How Cognitive Neuroscience May Contribute to Levelling the Playing Field. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 54.0
    The study of socioeconomic status (SES) and the brain finds itself in a circumstance unusual for Cognitive Neuroscience: large numbers of questions with both practical and scientific importance exist, but they are currently under-researched and ripe for investigation. This review aims to highlight these questions, to outline their potential significance, and to suggest routes by which they might be approached. Although remarkably few neural studies have been carried out so far, there exists a large literature of previous behavioural work. (...)
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  30. Fiona Steele & Fatma El-Zahraa M. M. Geel (1999). The Impact of Family Planning Supply Factors on Unmet Need in Rural Egypt 1988ð1989. Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):311-326.score: 54.0
    This paper examines the reasons for the high level of unmet needfor contraception in rural Egypt, using data from the individual survey andservice availability module of the 1988Ð89 Egypt Demographic and HealthSurvey. Two broad sets of potential factors are considered: characteristics ofa woman which influence her desire for children and thus her propensity touse contraception, and factors relating to the family planning serviceenvironment in which she lives. The results from a multivariate analysis showthat certain individual characteristics, such as (...)
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  31. Kwasi Owusu Boadi & Markku Kuitunen (2006). Factors Affecting the Choice of Cooking Fuel, Cooking Place and Respiratory Health in the Accra Metropolitan Area, Ghana. Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (3):403-412.score: 54.0
    Indoor air pollution resulting from the combustion of solid fuels has been identified as a major health threat in the developing world. This study examines how the choice of cooking fuel, place of cooking and behavioural risk factors affect respiratory health infections in Accra, Ghana. About 65·3% of respondents use charcoal and 4·2% use unprocessed wood. A total of 241 (25·4%) respondents who cook had had respiratory health symptoms in the two weeks preceding the study. Household socioeconomic status (...)
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  32. Joseph Keating, Kate Macintyre, Charles M. Mbogo, John I. Githure & John C. Beier (2005). Self-Reported Malaria and Mosquito Avoidance in Relation to Household Risk Factors in a Kenyan Coastal City. Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (6):761-771.score: 54.0
    A geographically stratified cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2002 to investigate household-level factors associated with use of mosquito control measures and self-reported malaria in Malindi, Kenya. A total of 629 households were surveyed. Logistic regressions were used to analyse the data. Half of all households (51%) reported all occupants using an insecticide-treated bed net and at least one additional mosquito control measure such as insecticides or removal of standing water. Forty-nine per cent reported a history of malaria in the (...)
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  33. M. Mohsin, A. E. Bauman & B. Jalaludin (2006). The Influence of Antenatal and Maternal Factors on Stillbirths and Neonatal Deaths in New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (5):643-657.score: 54.0
    This study identified the influences of maternal socio-demographic and antenatal factors on stillbirths and neonatal deaths in New South Wales, Australia. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to explore the association of selected antenatal and maternal characteristics with stillbirths and neonatal deaths. The findings of this study showed that stillbirths and neonatal deaths significantly varied by infant sex, maternal age, Aboriginality, maternal country of birth, socioeconomic status, parity, maternal smoking behaviour during pregnancy, maternal diabetes mellitus, maternal hypertension, antenatal (...)
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  34. James E. Swain, Suzanne C. Perkins, Carolyn J. Dayton, Eric D. Finegood & S. Shaun Ho (2012). Parental Brain and Socioeconomic Epigenetic Effects in Human Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):378-379.score: 54.0
    Critically significant parental effects in behavioral genetics may be partly understood as a consequence of maternal brain structure and function of caregiving systems recently studied in humans as well as rodents. Key parental brain areas regulate emotions, motivation/reward, and decision making, as well as more complex social-cognitive circuits. Additional key environmental factors must include socioeconomic status and paternal brain physiology. These have implications for developmental and evolutionary biology as well as public policy.
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  35. Janet Maia Wojcicki (2005). Socioeconomic Status as a Risk Factor for HIV Infection in Women in East, Central and Southern Africa: A Systematic Review. Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (1):1-36.score: 50.0
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  36. Diane Swanson (1992). A Critical Evaluation of Etzioni's Socioeconomic Theory: Implications for the Field of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (7):545 - 553.score: 36.0
    Given the pervasive influence of neoclassical economic theory on the field of business, the opposition of the standard economists to the inclusion of moral factors in economic decisions provides an intellectual resistance to the ideas of many business ethicists. Etzioni (1988) offers a theoretical alternative to the neoclassical model, an alternative that includes a moral dimension. This article: (1) highlights the differences between Etzioni''s proposed model and the neoclassical economic paradigm; (2) describes and critically evaluates Etzioni''s proposed theory in (...)
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  37. Jacquineau Azétsop & Tisha R. Joy (2013). Access to Nutritious Food, Socioeconomic Individualism and Public Health Ethics in the USA: A Common Good Approach. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):16.score: 36.0
    Good nutrition plays an important role in the optimal growth, development, health and well-being of individuals in all stages of life. Healthy eating can reduce the risk of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some types of cancer. However, the capitalist mindset that shapes the food environment has led to the commoditization of food. Food is not just a marketable commodity like any other commodity. Food is different from other commodities on the market in that it is (...)
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  38. Greg Mikkelson, Economic Inequality Predicts Biodiversity Loss.score: 30.0
    Human activity is causing high rates of biodiversity loss. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the extent to which socioeconomic factors exacerbate or ameliorate our impacts on biological diversity. One such factor, economic inequality, has been shown to affect public health, and has been linked to environmental problems in general. We tested how strongly economic inequality is related to biodiversity loss in particular. We found that among countries, and among US states, the number of species that are threatened (...)
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  39. George Khushf (1998). A Radical Rupture in the Paradigm of Modern Medicine: Conflicts of Interest, Fiduciary Obligations, and the Scientific Ideal. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):98 – 122.score: 30.0
    Conflicts of interest serve as a cipher for a radical rupture in the Flexnerian paradigm of medicine, and they can only be addressed if we recognize that health care is now practiced by institutions, not just individual physicians. By showing how "appropriate utilization of services" or "that which is medically indicated" is a function of socioeconomic factors related to institutional responsibilities, I point toward an administrative and organizational ethic as a needed component for addressing conflicts of interest. The (...)
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  40. George Khushf (2007). An Agenda for Future Debate on Concepts of Health and Disease. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (1):19-27.score: 30.0
    The traditional contrast between naturalist and normativist disease concepts fails to capture the most salient features of the health concepts debate. By using health concepts as a window on background notions of medical science and ethics, I show how Christopher Boorse (an influential naturalist) and Lennart Nordenfelt (an influential normativist) actually share deep assumptions about the character of medicine. Their disease concepts attempt, in different ways, to shore up the same medical model. For both, health concepts function like demarcation criteria (...)
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  41. D. Rodríguez-Arias, G. Moutel, M. P. Aulisio, A. Salfati, J. C. Coffin, J. L. Rodríguez-Arias, L. Calvo & C. Hervé (2007). Advance Directives and the Family: French and American Perspectives. Clinical Ethics 2 (3):139-145.score: 30.0
    Several studies have explored differences between North American and European doctor patient relationships. They have focused primarily on differences in philosophical traditions and historic and socioeconomic factors between these two regions that might lead to differences in behaviour, as well as divergent concepts in and justifications of medical practice. However, few empirical intercultural studies have been carried out to identify in practice these cultural differences. This lack of standard comparative empirical studies led us to compare differences between France (...)
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  42. Lisa S. Parker & Valerie B. Satkoske (2012). Ethical Dimensions of Disparities in Depression Research and Treatment in the Pharmacogenomic Era. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):886-903.score: 30.0
    Disparities in access to, and utilization of, treatment for depression among African-American and Caucasian elderly adults have been well-documented. Less fully explored are the multidimensional factors responsible for these disparities. The intersection of cultural constructs, socioeconomic factors, multiple levels of racism, and stigma attending both mental health issues and older age may help to explain disparities in the treatment of the depressed elderly. Personalized medicine with its promise of developing interventions tailored to an individual's health needs and (...)
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  43. Abe Goldman (1991). Tradition and Change in Postharvest Pest Management in Kenya. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):99-113.score: 30.0
    The hazard of postharvest pest losses is ubiquitous in peasant farming systems; as a result, farmers invariably have some response to the threat of these losses. Responses to postharvest pests may be more extensive than to field pests, even when, by statistical measures, the usual levels of losses are comparable. In studies of pest management practices in three contrasting areas in Kenya, it was found that farmers virtually always rely on an array of techniques and strategies, usually including both older (...)
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  44. S. Iyer & M. F. G. Monteiro (2004). The Risk of Child and Adolescent Mortality Among Vulnerable Populations in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (5):523-546.score: 30.0
    This study investigated the importance of socioeconomic factors such as education, income, religion, family structure and residence in explaining the increased risk of mortality among vulnerable populations aged less than 20 years in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data used were from the 1991 Brazilian Demographic Census and comprised 121,060 women aged 15–49 residing in Rio de Janeiro. Two alternative statistical methods were used to calculate the risk of death: the widely used Brass method (an indirect estimate which assesses (...)
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  45. A. Magdalena Hurtado, Carol A. Lambourne, Kim R. Hill & Karen Kessler (2006). The Public Health Implications of Maternal Care Trade-Offs. Human Nature 17 (2):129-154.score: 30.0
    The socioeconomic and ethnic characteristics of parents are some of the most important correlates of adverse health outcomes in childhood. However, the relationships between ethnic, economic, and behavioral factors and the health outcomes responsible for this pervasive finding have not been specified in child health epidemiology. The general objective of this paper is to propose a theoretical approach to the study of maternal behaviors and child health in diverse ethnic and socioeconomic environments. The specific aims are: (a) (...)
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  46. Gebremariam Woldemicael (2000). The Effects of Water Supply and Sanitation on Childhood Mortality in Urban Eritrea. Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (2):207-227.score: 30.0
    Child mortality differentials according to water supply and sanitation in many urban areas of developing countries suggest that access to piped water and toilet facilities can improve the survival chances of children. The central question in this study is whether access to piped water and a flush toilet affects the survival chance of children under five in urban areas of Eritrea. The study uses data collected by the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) project in Eritrea in 1995. The results show (...)
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  47. Andrew M. Courtwright (2009). Justice, Stigma, and the New Epidemiology of Health Disparities. Bioethics 23 (2):90-96.score: 24.0
    Recent research in epidemiology has identified a number of factors beyond access to medical care that contribute to health disparities. Among the so-called socioeconomic determinants of health are income, education, and the distribution of social capital. One factor that has been overlooked in this discussion is the effect that stigmatization can have on health. In this paper, I identify two ways that social stigma can create health disparities: directly by impacting health-care seeking behaviour and indirectly through the internalization (...)
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  48. Jeffrey R. Cohen & Nonna Martinov Bennie (2006). The Applicability of a Contingent Factors Model to Accounting Ethics Research. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):1 - 18.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses the relevancy of a contingent factors model posited by Jones for conducting accounting ethics research. Using a sample of 37 experienced Australian auditing managers and partners of all of the ‘Big Four’ multinational accounting firms, we find that the contextual model developed by Jones can help guide accounting ethics research by isolating the contingent factors that affect ethical decision making. Moreover, we examine how the factors differ across different accounting settings. Implications for accounting ethics (...)
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  49. Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.score: 24.0
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research conducted in (...)
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  50. William T. Ross & Diana C. Robertson (2003). A Typology of Situational Factors: Impact on Salesperson Decision-Making About Ethical Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):213 - 234.score: 24.0
    We explore two dimensions of situational factors expected to influence decision-making about ethical issues among sales representatives – universal vs. particular and direct vs. indirect. We argue that these distinctions are important theoretically, methodologically, and managerially. We test our hypotheses by means of a survey of 252 sales representatives. Our results confirm that considering universal and particular and direct and indirect situational factors contributes to our understanding of decision-making about ethical issues within a sales context, specifically willingness to (...)
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