Search results for 'Socrates' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2007). Socrates on How Wrongdoing Damages the Soul. Journal of Ethics 11 (4):337 - 356.score: 24.0
    There has been little scholarly attention given to explaining exactly how and why Socrates thinks that wrongdoing damages the soul. But there is more than a simple gap in the literature here, we shall argue. The most widely accepted view of Socratic moral psychology, we claim, actually leaves this well-known feature of Socrates’ philosophy absolutely inexplicable. In the first section of this paper, we rehearse this view of Socratic moral psychology, and explain its inadequacy on the issue of (...)
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  2. Nathan Hanna (2007). Socrates and Superiority. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):251-268.score: 24.0
    I propose an alternative interpretation of the Crito. The arguments that are typically taken to be Socrates’ primary arguments against escape are actually supplementary arguments that rely on what I call the Superiority Thesis, the thesis that the state and its citizens are members of a moral hierarchy where those below are tied by bonds of obligation to those above. I provide evidence that Socrates holds this thesis, demonstrate how it resolves a number of apparent difficulties and show (...)
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  3. Catherine Osborne (2006). Socrates in the Platonic Dialogues. Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):1–21.score: 24.0
    If Socrates is portrayed holding one view in one of Plato's dialogues and a different view in another, should we be puzzled? If (as I suggest) Plato's Socrates is neither the historical Socrates, nor a device for delivering Platonic doctrine, but a tool for the dialectical investigation of a philosophical problem, then we should expect a new Socrates, with relevant commitments, to be devised for each setting. Such a dialectical device – the tailor-made Socrates (...)
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  4. Tongdong Bai (2010). What to Do in an Unjust State?: On Confucius's and Socrates's Views on Political Duty. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):375-390.score: 24.0
    Confucius argued for the centrality of the superior man’s political duty to his fellow human beings and to the state, while Socrates suggested that the superior man (the philosopher) may have no such political duty. However, Confucius also suggested that one not enter or stay—let alone save—a troubled state, while Socrates stayed in an unjust state, apparently fulfilling his political duty to the state by accepting an unjust verdict. In this essay, I will try to show how Confucius (...)
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  5. Christopher Rowe (2012). Socrates on Reason, Appetite and Passion: A Response to Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith, Socratic Moral Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 16 (3):305-324.score: 24.0
    Section 1 of this essay distinguishes between four interpretations of Socratic intellectualism, which are, very roughly: (1) a version in which on any given occasion desire, and then action, is determined by what we think will turn out best for us, that being what we all, always, really desire; (2) a version in which on any given occasion action is determined by what we think will best satisfy our permanent desire for what is really best for us; (3) a version (...)
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  6. Hossein Ghaffari (2011). Is Socrates a Prophet? (In Light of the Views of His Contemporaries and the Main Commentators). Sophia 50 (3):391-411.score: 24.0
    Everybody acknowledges the importance of Socrates’ role and influence on the history of philosophy, as well as on the culture of humanity. He is also considered to be the first martyr of virtue and wisdom in human history. In spite of this, even though most Western commentators recognize the elevated meanings and high level of Socratic wisdom, they refuse to consider it to have a supra-human source and to be divine prophecy. In this article and through the analysis of (...)
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  7. A. C. Besley (2013). Philosophy, Education and the Corruption of Youth—From Socrates to Islamic Extremists. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (1):6-19.score: 24.0
    Following Aristotle?s description of youth and brief discussion about indoctrination and parrhesia, the article historicizes Socrates? trial as the intersection of philosophy, education and a teacher?s influence on youth. It explores the historic-political context and how contemporary Athenians might have viewed Socrates and his student?s actions, whereby his teachings were implicated in three coups led by his former students against Athenian democracy, for or which he accepted little or no responsibility. Socrates appears subversively anti-democratic. This provides grounds (...)
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  8. Dale Jacquette (2014). Socrates on the Moral Mischief of Misology. Argumentation 28 (1):1-17.score: 24.0
    In Plato’s dialogues, the Phaedo, Laches, and Republic, Socrates warns his interlocutors about the dangers of misology. Misology is explained by analogy with misanthropy, not as the hatred of other human beings, but as the hatred of the logos or reasonable discourse. According to Socrates, misology arises when a person alternates between believing an argument to be correct, and then refuting it as false. If Socrates is right, then misanthropy is sometimes instilled when a person goes from (...)
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  9. Mark E. Jonas, Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa & James Braun (2012). Appetite, Reason, and Education in Socrates' 'City of Pigs'. Phronesis 57 (4):332-357.score: 24.0
    In Book II of the Republic (370c-372d), Socrates briefly depicts a city where each inhabitant contributes to the welfare of all by performing the role for which he or she is naturally suited. Socrates calls this city the `true city' and the `healthy one'. Nearly all commentators have argued that Socrates' praise of the city cannot be taken at face value, claiming that it does not represent Socrates' preferred community. The point of this paper is to (...)
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  10. Pierdaniele Giaretta & Giuseppe Spolaore (2012). Validity and Effectiveness of Ambiguity: A Famous Argument by Socrates. [REVIEW] Argumentation 26 (3):393-407.score: 24.0
    An argument can be superficially valid and rhetorically effective even if what is plausibly meant, what is derived from what, and how it is derived is not at all clear. An example of such an argument is provided by Socrates’s famous refutation of Euthyphro’s second definition of holy, which is generally regarded as clearly valid and successful. This paper provides a stricter logical analysis than the ones in the literature. In particular, it is shown that the argument contains a (...)
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  11. Josef Wolfgang Degen (2011). Socrates Did It Before Gödel. Logic and Logical Philosophy 20 (3):205-214.score: 24.0
    We translate Socrates’ famous saying I know that I know nothing into the arithmetical sentence I prove that I prove nothing. Then it is easy to show that this translated saying is formally undecidable in formal arithmetic, using Gödel’s Second Incompleteness Theorem. We investigate some variations of this Socrates-Gödel sentence. In an appendix we sketch a ramified epistemic logic with propositional quantifiers in order to analyze the Socrates-Gödel sentence in a more logical way, separated from the arithmetical (...)
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  12. Ana Carolina da Costa E. Fonseca (2012). Os dois sentidos da crítica nietzscheana: Sócrates como um caso exemplar. Veritas 57 (1).score: 24.0
    Toma-se a crítica de Nietzsche a Sócrates como um caso exemplar que mostra os dois sentidos fundamentais da crítica nietzscheana: (i) a crítica nietzscheana consiste em censura e em elogio de modo dual, ou seja, censura e elogio são aspectos da crítica; e (ii) ao criticar alguém, Nietzsche está, igualmente, se autocriticando.
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  13. ChristoPher P. Long (2012). Socrates: Platonic political ideal. Ideas Y Valores 61 (SPE149):11-38.score: 24.0
    This essay articulates the differences and suggests the similarities between the practices of Socratic political speaking and those of Platonic political writing. The essay delineates Socratic speaking and Platonic writing as both erotically oriented toward ideals capable of transforming the lives of individuals and their relationships with one another. Besides it shows that in the Protagoras the practices of Socratic political speaking are concerned less with Protagoras than with the individual young man, Hippocrates. In the Phaedo, this ideal of a (...)
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  14. Thomas M. Robinson (2012). ¿Debió Sócrates haber aceptado el reto de Glaucón y Adimanto? Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (34):11-26.score: 24.0
    Aunque el Libro I de República parece un diálogo socrático estándar sobre un término moral como justicia, que culmina con un estado de aparente aporía, se termina afirmando que la justicia es como un estado del alma caracterizado por el conocimiento. El libro I termina siendo el preámbulo para mostrar que ser justo es mejor que ser injusto, y que la justicia es en y por sí misma beneficiosa sin relación con cualquier ‘recompensa o consecuencia’ que devenga para el individuo (...)
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  15. Rachel Barney (2006). Socrates' Refutation of Thrasymachus. In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    Socrates’ refutations of Thrasymachus in Republic I are unsatisfactory on a number of levels which need to be carefully distinguished. At the same time several of his arguments are more powerful than they initially appear. Of particular interest are those which turn on the idea of a craft, which represents a shared norm of practical rationality here contested by Socrates and Thrasymachus.
     
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  16. Germán Ulises Bula Caraballo (2005). Sócrates y el juego de jactancia. Logos 9:59-73.score: 24.0
    This text shows how the Socratic activity can be seen as a game activity, and mostly as a boasting game, mainly based upon the Homo Ludens by Johann Huizinga’s text. In a second part, the text illustrates Socrates’ role in such a game activity by exploring what it may be revealed from the nature of philosophy when revising it sub specie ludi.
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  17. Francesca Pentassuglio (2014). Socrates on virtue and selfknowledge in Alcibiades I and Aeschines' Alcibiades. Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 12:65-76.score: 24.0
    The paper focuses on the concepts of virtue and self-knowledge in Alcibiades I and Aeschines’ Alcibiades, which are marked by striking similarities in the way they discuss these themes and their interconnection. First of all, in both dialogues the notions of ἀμαθία and ἀρετή seem to be connected and both are bound up with the issue of εὐδαιμονία: Socrates points out that ἀρετή is the only source of true εὐδαιμονία and encourages Alcibiades to acquire it, stressing the need for (...)
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  18. Lorena Rojas Parma (2012). De amore: Sócrates y Alcibíades en el Banquete de Platón. Areté. Revista de Filosofía 23 (1):159-186.score: 24.0
    “De amore: Socrates and Alcibiades in Plato’s Symposium”. This articleproposes to study the relationship between Socrates and Alcibiades according toPlato’s Symposium. By these means, we seek to relect upon the other kind of lovewhich Socrates also exempliies in the dialogue, with the aim of understandingSocrates’ behavior towards Alcibiades beyond the moral contraposition betweenthe spiritual love of contemplation and the earthly love of Alcibiades. Moreover,we aim to present an approach to this relationship without identifying it with aSocratic conirmation (...)
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  19. Steve Johnson (1998). Skills, Socrates and the Sophists: Learning From History. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):201 - 213.score: 22.0
    The Sophists, and the Socratic response they provoked, are considered in order to elucidate issues raised by present-day skill-talk. These issues include: whether skills avoid questions of ends and truth; the existence of general skills, such as critical thinking; the importance of knowledge; skills and the personality; and some implications for teaching and philosophy.
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  20. Catherine Osborne (2001). Successors of Socrates, Disciples of Descartes, and Followers of Freud. [REVIEW] Apeiron 34 (2):181 - 193.score: 21.0
    All three books reviewed here are turning over again for us the pages of perennially irresistible thinkers whose ideas never cease to hold us transfixed; all three are inviting us to notice that the material that we thought we knew has got more to do with what Nehamas calls 'the art of living' than we might have realised; and all three are making space for attitudes, responses and areas of self-understanding that are, by traditional classifications, irrational and hence sometimes inadequately (...)
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  21. Mark Anderson (2005). Socrates as Hoplite. Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):273-289.score: 21.0
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  22. Scott Berman (1991). Socrates and Callicles on Pleasure. Phronesis 36 (2):117-140.score: 21.0
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  23. J. Clerk Shaw (2011). Socrates and the True Political Craft. Classical Philology 106:187-207.score: 21.0
  24. Geoffrey Bagwell (forthcoming). Socrates and the Gods [Review]. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 34 (1).score: 21.0
  25. Mehmet Karabela (2012). The Ironic Defense of Socrates: Plato’s Apology, David Leibowitz, Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Political Studies Review 10 (3):401-402.score: 21.0
  26. Walter Omar Kohan (2013). Plato and Socrates: From an Educator of Childhood to a Childlike Educator? Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):313-325.score: 21.0
  27. Richard Leo Enos (1991). Socrates Questions Gorgias: The Rhetorical Vector of Plato's ?Gorgias? [REVIEW] Argumentation 5 (1):5-15.score: 21.0
    This essay argues that Plato's “Gorgias,” a dialogue lauding dialectic over rhetoric, uses a question-and-answer format as a heuristic of argument. Specific observations are advanced to explain the implications of Plato's techniques and to provide a more sensitive understanding of the process by which sought to gain the adherence of his readers.
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  28. Benoît Castelnérac (2008). O Sócrates de Platão e os limites do intelectualismo na ética. Doispontos 4 (2).score: 21.0
    Normal 0 21 Minha intenção é a de mostrar como uma leitura cética dos diálogos socráticos de Platão permite explicar alguns impasses nos quais resulta a interpretação dogmática desses diálogos. Enumero aqui, de maneira programática, os elementos que permitirão sustentar que, nos diálogos de juventude, Platão desenvolveu uma lógica que conduz a uma posição forte sobre os limites do conhecimento e do intelectualismo. Essa interpretação se inspira em traços dominantes do ceticismo de Arcesilau (séc. III a.C.). Mostrarei como os diálogos (...)
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  29. Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon (1990). Statements of Method and Teaching: The Case of Socrates. Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (2):139-156.score: 21.0
  30. Filip Kovacevic (2011). Zorba, Socrates, and the Good Life. Filozofija I Društvo 22 (1):193-206.score: 21.0
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  31. Avi I. Mintz (2010). “Chalepa Ta Kala,” “Fine Things Are Difficult”: Socrates' Insights Into the Psychology of Teaching and Learning. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (3):287-299.score: 21.0
  32. Pierre Hadot (1995). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Spiritual Exercises From Socrates to Foucault. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    This book presents a history of spiritual exercises from Socrates to early Christianity, an account of their decline in modern philosophy, and a discussion of ...
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  33. S. Marc Cohen (1971). Socrates on the Definition of Piety. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (1):1-13.score: 18.0
    The central argument in the Euthyphro is the one Socrates advances against the definition of piety as "what all the gods love." The argument turns on establishing that a loved thing (philoumenon) is 1) a loved thing because it is loved (phileitai), not 2) loved because it is a loved thing. I suggest that this claim can be understood and found acceptable if we take "because" to be used equivocally in it. Despite the equivocation, Socrates' argument is valid, (...)
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  34. Sara Ahbel-Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.) (2006/2009). A Companion to Socrates. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    Written by an outstanding international team of scholars, this Companion explores the profound influence of Socrates on the history of Western philosophy. A survey exploring the profound influence of Socrates on the history of Western philosophy. Discusses the life of Socrates and key philosophical doctrines associated with him. Covers the whole range of Socratic studies from the ancient world to contemporary European philosophy. Examines Socrates’ place in the larger philosophical traditions of the Hellenistic world, the Roman (...)
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  35. Daniel E. Anderson (1967). Socrates' Concept of Piety. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (1):1-13.score: 18.0
    This article, Based on a study of the "euthyphro," "apology" and "crito," suggests that for socrates (and therefore, Presumably, The young plato) piety is service to the dialectic, And that for socrates the dialectic itself takes over the position reserved in the popular religion for the gods (thus making socrates guilty, At least metaphorically, Of the charge of believing in "other new divine powers"). Part one seeks to establish that the dialectic controls the pious man's beliefs; part (...)
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  36. Gregory Vlastos (1985). Happiness and Virtue in Socrates' Moral Theory. Topoi 4 (1):3-22.score: 18.0
    In Section IV above we start with texts whose prima facie import speaks so strongly for the Identity Thesis that any interpretation which stops short of it looks like a shabby, timorous, thesis-saving move. What else could Socrates mean when he declares with such conviction that ‘no evil’ can come to a good man (T19), that his prosecutors ‘could not harm’ him (T16(a)), that if a man has not been made more unjust he has not been harmed (T20), that (...)
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  37. Eric Brown, Socrates the Stoic? Rethinking Protreptic, Eudaimonism, and the Role of Plato's Socratic Dialogues.score: 18.0
    In the Euthydemus, Socrates and young Cleinias agree, "Not one of the other things is good or bad, but of these two, one—wisdom—is good, and the other—ignorance—is bad" (281e3-5).1 To some, this is the outrageous and characteristically Stoic claim that wisdom is the only good.
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  38. Kristian Urstad, Loving Socrates: The Individual and the Ladder of Love in Plato's Symposium. Res Cogitans.score: 18.0
    In Plato’s Symposium, the priestess Diotima, whom Socrates introduces as an expert in love, describes how the lover who would advance rightly in erotics would ascend from loving a particular beautiful body and individual to loving Beauty itself. This hierarchy is conventionally referred to as Plato’s scala amoris or ‘ladder of love’, for the reason that the uppermost form of love cannot be reached without having initially stepped on the first rung of the ladder, which is the physical attraction (...)
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  39. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1997). Socrates and the Unity of the Virtues. Journal of Ethics 1 (4):311-324.score: 18.0
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that each of the virtue-terms refers to one thing (: 333b4). But in the Laches (190c8–d5, 199e6–7), Socrates claims that courage is a proper part of virtue as a whole, and at Euthyphro 11e7–12e2, Socrates says that piety is a proper part of justice. But A cannot be both identical to B and also a proper part of B – piety cannot be both identical to justice and also a proper part of (...)
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  40. Thomas C. Brickhouse (2004). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Plato is the most important philosopher in the history of Western philosophy. This guidebook introduces and examines his three dialogues that deal with the death of Socrates: Euthphryo , Apology and Crito . These dialogues are widely regarded as the closest exposition of Socrates' ideas. Plato and the Trial of Socrates introduces and assesses: * Plato's life and the background to the three dialogues * The ideas and text in the three dialogues * Plato's continuing importance to (...)
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  41. D. Wolfsdorf (2003). Socrates' Pursuit of Definitions. Phronesis 48 (4):271 - 312.score: 18.0
    "Socrates' Pursuit of Definitions" examines the manner in which Socrates pursues definitions in Plato's early definitional dialogues and advances the following claims. Socrates evaluates definitions (proposed by his interlocutors or himself) by considering their consistency with conditions of the identity of F (F-conditions) to which he is committed. In evaluating proposed definitions, Socrates seeks to determine their truth-value. Socrates evaluates the truth-value of a proposed definition by considering the consistency of the proposed definition with F-conditions (...)
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  42. Luca Castagnoli (2004). Protagoras Refuted: How Clever is Socrates' "Most Clever" Argument at Theaetetus 171a–C?'. Topoi 23 (1):3-32.score: 18.0
    This article aims at reconstructing the logic and assessing the force of Socrates' argument against Protagoras' 'Measure Doctrine' (MD) at Theaetetus 171a–c. I examine and criticise some influential interpretations of the passage, according to which, e.g., Socrates is guilty of ignoratio elenchi by dropping the essential Protagorean qualifiers or successfully proves that md is self-refuting provided the missing qualifiers are restored by the attentive reader. Having clarified the meaning of MD, I analyse in detail the broader section 170a–171d (...)
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  43. George Rudebusch (1999). Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In this study, George Rudebusch addresses whether Socrates was a hedonist--whether he believed pleasure to be the good. In attempting to locate Socrates' position on hedonism, Rudebusch examines the passages in Plato's early dialogues that are the most disputed on the topic. He maintains that Socrates identifies pleasant activity with virtuous activity, describing Socrates' hedonism as one of activity, not sensation. This analysis allows for Socrates to find both virtue and pleasure to be the good, (...)
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  44. Emily R. Wilson (2007). The Death of Socrates. Harvard University Press.score: 18.0
    Introduction: The man who drank the hemlock -- Socrates' philosophy -- Politics and society -- Plato and others : who created the death of Socrates? -- 'A Greek chatterbox' : the death of Socrates in the Roman Empire -- Pain and revelation : the death of Socrates and the death of Jesus -- The apotheosis of philosophy : from enlightenment to revolution -- Talk, truth, totalitarianism : the problem of Socrates in modern times.
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  45. Oded Balaban (2011). The Moral Intellectualism of Plato's Socrates The Case of the Hippias Minor. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):1-14.score: 18.0
    Commentators do not take Socrates' theses in the Hippias Minor seriously. They believe it is an aporetic dialogue and even that Socrates does not mean what he says. Hence they are unable to understand the presuppositions behind Socrates' two interconnected theses: that those who do wrong and lie voluntarily are better than those who do wrong unintentionally, and that no one does wrong and lies voluntarily. Arguing that liars are better than the unenlightened, Socrates concludes that (...)
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  46. Jacob Howland (2006). Kierkegaard and Socrates: A Study in Philosophy and Faith. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This volume is a study of the relationship between philosophy and faith in Søren Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments. It is also the first book to focus on the role of Socrates in this psuedonymous volume, and it illuminates the significance of Socrates for Kierkegaard's thought in general. Jacob Howland argues that in Fragments, philosophy and faith are closely related passions. A careful examination of the role of Socrates in Fragments demonstrates that Socratic, philosophical eros opens up a path (...)
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  47. Eric Brown, Socrates the Cosmopolitan.score: 18.0
    When Socrates was asked to which [country] he belonged, he would say, 'To the world,' for he thought that he was an inhabitant and citizen of the whole world."2 So we are told by those philosophers in later antiquity who liked to see themselves as the heirs of Socrates and as cosmopolitans.
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  48. Mark Migotti (1998). Slave Morality, Socrates, and the Bushmen: A Reading of the First Essay of on the Genealogy of Morals. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (4):745-779.score: 18.0
    This paper raises three questions: (1) Can Nietzsche provide a satisfactory account of how the slave revolt could have begun to "poison the consciences" of masters? (2) Does Nietzsche's affinity for "master values" preclude him from acknowledging claims of justice that rest upon a sense of equality among human beings? and (3) How does Nietzsche's story fare when looked on as (at least in part) an empirical hypothesis? The first question is answered in the affirmative, the second in the negative, (...)
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  49. Roslyn Weiss (1998). Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In this book, Roslyn Weiss contends that, contrary to prevailing notions, Plato's Crito does not show an allegiance between Socrates and the state that condemned him. Denying that the speech of the Laws represents the views of Socrates, Weiss deftly brings to light numerous indications that Socrates provides to the attentive reader that he and the Laws are not partners but antagonists in the argument and that he is singularly unimpressed by the case against escaping prison presented (...)
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