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  1. Taylor L. Benson & Sohee Park (2013). Exceptional Visuospatial Imagery in Schizophrenia; Implications for Madness and Creativity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  2. Hayley Darke, Joel S. Peterman, Sohee Park, Suresh Sundram & Olivia Carter (2013). Are Patients with Schizophrenia Impaired in Processing Non-Emotional Features of Human Faces? Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    It is known that individuals with schizophrenia exhibit signs of impaired face processing, however, the exact perceptual and cognitive mechanisms underlying these deficits are yet to be elucidated. One possible source of confusion in the current literature is the methodological and conceptual inconsistencies that can arise from the varied treatment of different aspects of face processing relating to emotional and non-emotional aspects of face perception. This review aims to disentangle the literature by focusing on the performance of patients with schizophrenia (...)
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  3. Katharine N. Thakkar, Natasha Matthews & Sohee Park (2008). A Complete Theory of Psychosis and Autism as Diametric Disorders of Social Brain Must Consider Full Range of Clinical Syndromes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):277-278.
    We argue that autism and psychosis spectrum disorders cannot be conceptualized as polar extremes of mentalizing ability. We raise two main objections: (1) the autistic-psychotic continuum, as conceptualized by the authors, excludes defining features of schizophrenia spectrum: negative symptoms, which correlate more strongly with mentalizing impairments; and (2) little evidence exists for a relationship between mentalizing ability and positive symptoms.
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  4. Duje Tadin, Peiyan Wong, Michael W. Mebane, Michael J. Berkowitz, Hollister Trott & Sohee Park (2005). Believing is Seeing in Schizophrenia: The Role of Top-Down Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):775-775.
    The etiology of visual hallucinations is largely undetermined in schizophrenia. Collerton et al.'s PAD model partly concurs with what we know about neurocognition in schizophrenia, but we need to specify the types of perceptual and attentional abnormalities that are implicated in recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH). Available data suggest that abnormal attentional control and top-down processing play a larger role than the ventral stream deficits.
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  5. Sohee Park, Junghee Lee, Bradley Folley & Jejoong Kim (2003). Schizophrenia: Putting Context in Context. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):98-99.
    Although context-processing deficits may be core features of schizophrenia, context remains a poorly defined concept. To test Phillips & Silverstein's model, we need to operationalize context more precisely. We offer several useful ways of framing context and discuss enhancing or facilitating schizophrenic patients' performance under different contextual situations. Furthermore, creativity may be a byproduct of cognitive uncoordination.
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