Search results for 'Solidarity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Kennedy McFarland, Compassionate Solidarity & Kathleen T. Talvacchia (forthcoming). Association Between Attributional Styles and Academic Performance of Students in a Program of Reli-Gious Studies, The, by Charles W. Ethos.score: 30.0
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  2. Simon Derpmann (2009). Solidarity and Cosmopolitanism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (3):303 - 315.score: 24.0
    The review article examines the relation of solidarity and cosmopolitanism in contemporary political philosophical and sociological debates. In some contexts solidarity and cosmopolitanism are closely related, in others they are understood to be incompatible. The main body of the report is divided into three parts displaying a tentative classification of the reviewed literature on the subject. The first part serves to outline a general account of solidarity, the communal obligations that follow from it, and its opposition to (...)
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  3. Alison Bailey (2008). On Intersectionality, Empathy, and Feminist Solidarity. Peace and Justice Studies 18 (2):14-36.score: 24.0
    Naomi Zack's Inclusive Feminism: A Third Wave Theory of Women's Commonality (2005) begins with an original reading of the paradigm shift that ended U.S. second wave feminism. According to Zack there has been a crisis in academic and professional feminism since the late 1970s. It grew out of the anxieties about essentialism in the wake of white feminist's realization that our understandings of "sisterhood" and "women" excluded women of color and poor women. This realization eventually lead to the movement's foundational (...)
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  4. Alice MacLachlan (2008). Forgiveness and Moral Solidarity. In Stephen Bloch-Shulman & David White (eds.), Forgiveness: Probing the Boundaries. Inter-Disciplinary Press.score: 24.0
    The categorical denial of third-party forgiveness represents an overly individualistic approach to moral repair. Such an approach fails to acknowledge the important roles played by witnesses, bystanders, beneficiaries, and others who stand in solidarity to the primary victim and perpetrator. In this paper, I argue that the prerogative to forgive or withhold forgiveness is not universal, but neither is it restricted to victims alone. Not only can we make moral sense of some third-party acts and utterances of the form, (...)
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  5. Adam Cureton (2012). Solidarity and Social Moral Rules. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):691-706.score: 24.0
    The value of solidarity, which is exemplified in noble groups like the Civil Rights Movement along with more mundane teams, families and marriages, is distinctive in part because people are in solidarity over, for or with regard to something, such as common sympathies, interests, values, etc. I use this special feature of solidarity to resolve a longstanding puzzle about enacted social moral rules, which is, aren’t these things just heuristics, rules of thumb or means of coordination that (...)
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  6. Lev Ori (2011). Will Biomedical Enhancements Undermine Solidarity, Responsibility, Equality and Autonomy? Bioethics 25 (4):177-184.score: 24.0
    Prominent thinkers such as Jurgen Habermas and Michael Sandel are warning that biomedical enhancements will undermine fundamental political values. Yet whether biomedical enhancements will undermine such values depends on how biomedical enhancements will function, how they will be administered and to whom. Since only few enhancements are obtainable, it is difficult to tell whether these predictions are sound. Nevertheless, such warnings are extremely valuable. As a society we must, at the very least, be aware of developments that could have harmful (...)
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  7. Gijs van Donselaar (1998). The Freedom-Based Account of Solidarity and Basic Income. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):313-333.score: 24.0
    Real-libertarianism, as it is expressed in Philippe Van Parijs' recent monograph Real Freedom for All is characteristically committed to both self-ownership and 'solidarity with the infirm or handicapped. In this article it is argued that the conception of (real) freedom that is used to endorse self-ownership is inconsistent with the conception of (social) freedom or opportunity that is used to justify transfer payments to those with no or low earning capacity. The problem turns around the question whether (...)
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  8. Kees Schuyt (1998). The Sharing of Risks and the Risks of Sharing: Solidarity and Social Justice in the Welfare State. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):297-311.score: 24.0
    Solidarity as a social phenomenon means a sharing of feelings, interests, risks and responsibilities. The Western-European Welfare State can be seen as an organized system of solidarity, historically grown from group solidarity among workers, later between workers and employers, moving towards solidarity between larger social groups: between healthy people and the sick, between the young and the elderly, between the employed and the unemployed. This sharing of risks at a societal level however, has revealed the risks (...)
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  9. Klaus Peter Rippe (1998). Diminishing Solidarity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):355-373.score: 24.0
    Cases of acts of solidarity can be divided into at least two groups. Solidarity in a narrow sense of the term refers to what I label project-related solidarity; it is prevalent in the modern world at least as much as it was found in past worlds. In contrast, the philosophical discussions of "solidarity" refer to the altruism and mutuality typically found in close human relationships. This concept of "solidarity" is theoretically unfruitful and even misleading. I (...)
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  10. Rogeer Hoedemaekers & Wim Dekkers (2003). Justice and Solidarity in Priority Setting in Health Care. Health Care Analysis 11 (4):325-343.score: 24.0
    During the last decade a “technical” approach has become increasingly influential in health care priority setting. The various country reports illustrate, however, that non-technical considerations cannot be avoided. As they often remain implicit in health care package decisions, this paper aims to make these normative judgements an explicit part of the procedure. More specifically, it aims to integrate different models of distributive justice as well as the principle of solidarity in four different phases of a decision-making procedure, and to (...)
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  11. W. Julian Korab-Karpowicz (2010). Inclusive Values and the Righteousness of Life: The Foundation of Global Solidarity. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (3):305 - 313.score: 24.0
    Many scholars have argued that unity of humankind can be established on the basis of some basic or core human values. Instead of engaging in a comparative empirical research, compiling lists of core values derived from different cultures, discuss their relevance for human fellowship, I examine the simple values of life that during the 1980s united people in Poland and made them to form the powerful civic movement, which was Solidarity. Today we live in a world that is fundamentally (...)
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  12. Turo-Kimmo Lehtonen & Jyri Liukko (2011). The Forms and Limits of Insurance Solidarity. Journal of Business Ethics 103 (S1):33-44.score: 24.0
    What makes insurance special among risk technologies is the particular way in which it links solidarity and technical rationality. On one hand, within insurance practices ‘risk’ is always defined in technical terms. It is related to monetary measurement of value and to statistical probability calculated for a limited population. On the other hand, and at the same time, insurance has an inherent connection to solidarity. When taking out an insurance, one participates in the risk pool within which each (...)
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  13. Ben Saunders (2012). Altruism or Solidarity? The Motives for Organ Donation and Two Proposals. Bioethics 26 (7):376-381.score: 24.0
    Proposals for increasing organ donation are often rejected as incompatible with altruistic motivation on the part of donors. This paper questions, on conceptual grounds, whether most organ donors really are altruistic. If we distinguish between altruism and solidarity – a more restricted form of other-concern, limited to members of a particular group – then most organ donors exhibit solidarity, rather than altruism. If organ donation really must be altruistic, then we have reasons to worry about the motives of (...)
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  14. Massimo Reichlin (2011). The Role of Solidarity in Social Responsibility for Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):365-370.score: 24.0
    The Article focuses on the concept of social solidarity, as it is used in the Report of the International Bioethics Committee On Social Responsibility and Health. It is argued that solidarity plays a major role in supporting the whole framework of social responsibility, as presented by the IBC. Moreover, solidarity is not limited to members of particular groups, but potentially extended to all human beings on the basis of their inherent dignity; this sense of human solidarity (...)
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  15. Sally J. Scholz (2007). Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (1):38–52.score: 24.0
    This article examines the particular moral obligations of solidarity focusing on the solidary commitment against injustice or oppression. I argue that political solidarity entails three relationships—to other participants in action, to a cause or goal, and to those outside the unity of political solidarity. These relationships inform certain obligations. Activism is one of those obligations and I argue that violent activism is incompatible with the other relations and duties of solidarity. Activists may find themselves confronted with (...)
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  16. Spiros Gangas (2011). Values, Knowledge and Solidarity: Neglected Convergences Between Émile Durkheim and Max Scheler. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (4):353-371.score: 24.0
    Within the purview of the sociology of knowledge Durkheim and Scheler appear among its important inaugurators theorizing the social foundations of knowledge, seemingly from mutually exclusive perspectives. Scheler’s phenomenology of values and community is often juxtaposed with Durkheim’s attempt to integrate values in reality, represented by the social configuration of organic solidarity. This essay argues that the affinity between Scheler and Durkheim deserves reexamination. Means employed for pursuing this aim include a reconsideration of how values mediate reality, but, above (...)
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  17. Barbara Prainsack & Alena Buyx (2012). Solidarity in Contemporary Bioethics – Towards a New Approach. Bioethics 26 (7):343-350.score: 24.0
    This paper, which is based on an extensive analysis of the literature, gives a brief overview of the main ways in which solidarity has been employed in bioethical writings in the last two decades. As the vagueness of the term has been one of the main targets of critique, we propose a new approach to defining solidarity, identifying it primarily as a practice enacted at the interpersonal, communal, and contractual/legal levels. Our three-tier model of solidarity can also (...)
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  18. Richard E. Ashcroft (2000). Solidarity, Society and the Welfare State in the United Kingdom. Health Care Analysis 8 (4):377-394.score: 24.0
    Political argument and institutions in the UnitedKingdom have frequently been represented as the products of ablend of nationalistic conservatism, liberal individualism andsocialism, in which consensus has been prized over ideology. This situation changed, as the standard story has it, with therise of Thatcherism in the late 1970s, and again with the arrivalof Tony Blair's ``New Labour'' pragmatism in the late 1990s. Solidarity as an element of political discourse makes itsappearance in the UK late in the day. It has been (...)
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  19. Dan Egonsson (1999). Local Solidarity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (2):149-158.score: 24.0
    In this article I am particularly interested in the question of solidarity within the boundaries of one's own country. I discuss a qualified beneficence requirement, which claims that we ought to prevent something very bad from happening if it is in our power and if we can do it without sacrificing anything morally significant. I also discuss a fair-share principle, according to which, in Liam B. Murphy's version, "the sacrifice each agent is required to make is limited to the (...)
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  20. L. E. V. Ori (2011). Will Biomedical Enhancements Undermine Solidarity, Responsibility, Equality and Autonomy? Bioethics 25 (4):177-184.score: 24.0
    Prominent thinkers such as Jurgen Habermas and Michael Sandel are warning that biomedical enhancements will undermine fundamental political values. Yet whether biomedical enhancements will undermine such values depends on how biomedical enhancements will function, how they will be administered and to whom. Since only few enhancements are obtainable, it is difficult to tell whether these predictions are sound. Nevertheless, such warnings are extremely valuable. As a society we must, at the very least, be aware of developments that could have harmful (...)
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  21. Nicola Pasini (2000). Solidarity and the Role of the State in Italian Health Care. Health Care Analysis 8 (4):341-354.score: 24.0
    The article deals with the issue of solidarity in health care,with particular reference to the Italian context. It presents thedifficulties of the Italian NHS and assesses the current proposalto counter the crisis of the Welfare State by giving upinstitutional arrangements, in order to favour the so-called`social private'. Moreover, it addresses the question ofprioritisation and targeting in the context of health care,arguing for the insufficiency of the standard approach of neutralliberalism, and showing how the concept of solidarity might helpto (...)
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  22. Luigi Cembalo, Giuseppina Migliore & Giorgio Schifani (2013). Sustainability and New Models of Consumption: The Solidarity Purchasing Groups in Sicily. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):281-303.score: 24.0
    European society, with its steadily increasing welfare levels, is not only concerned with food (safety, prices), but also with other aspects such as biodiversity loss, landscape degradation, and pollution of water, soil, and atmosphere. To a great extent these concerns can be translated into a larger concept named sustainable development, which can be defined as a normative concept by). Sustainability in the food chain means creating a new sustainable agro-food system while taking the institutional element into account. While different concepts (...)
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  23. Lisa Eckenwiler, Christine Straehle & Ryoa Chung (2012). Global Solidarity, Migration and Global Health Inequity. Bioethics 26 (7):382-390.score: 24.0
    The grounds for global solidarity have been theorized and conceptualized in recent years, and many have argued that we need a global concept of solidarity. But the question remains: what can motivate efforts of the international community and nation-states? Our focus is the grounding of solidarity with respect to global inequities in health. We explore what considerations could motivate acts of global solidarity in the specific context of health migration, and sketch briefly what form this kind (...)
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  24. Meena Krishnamurthy (2013). Political Solidarity, Justice and Public Health. Public Health Ethics 6 (2):129-141.score: 24.0
    n this paper, I argue that political solidarity is important to justice. At its core, political solidarity is a relational concept. To be in a relation of political solidarity, is to be in a relation of connection or unity with one’s fellow citizens. I argue that fellow citizens can be said to stand in such a relation when they have attitudes of collective identification, mutual respect, mutual trust, and mutual support and loyalty toward one another. I argue (...)
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  25. Friedel Bolle, Yves Breitmoser, Jana Heimel & Claudia Vogel (2012). Multiple Motives of Pro-Social Behavior: Evidence From the Solidarity Game. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 72 (3):303-321.score: 24.0
    The article analyses experimental “solidarity games” with two benefactors and one beneficiary. Depending on their motive for giving—e.g., warm glow, altruism, or guilt—the benefactors’ response functions are either constant, decreasing, or increasing. If motives interact, or if envy is a concern, then more complex (unimodal) shapes may emerge. Controlling for random utility perturbations, we determine which and how many motives affect individual decision making. The main findings are that the motives of about 75% of the subjects can be identified (...)
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  26. Barry Lyons (2012). Solidarity, Children and Research. Bioethics 26 (7):369-375.score: 24.0
    While research on children is supported by many professional guidelines, international declarations and domestic legislation, when it is undertaken on children with no possibility of direct benefit it rests on shaky moral foundations. A number of authors have suggested that research enrolment is in the child's best interests, or that they have a moral duty or societal obligation to participate. However, these arguments are unpersuasive. Rather, I will propose in this paper that research participation by children seems most reasonable when (...)
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  27. Ori Lev (2011). Will Biomedical Enhancements Undermine Solidarity, Responsibility, Equality and Autonomy? Bioethics 25 (4):177--184.score: 24.0
    Prominent thinkers such as Jurgen Habermas and Michael Sandel are warning that biomedical enhancements will undermine fundamental political values. Yet whether biomedical enhancements will undermine such values depends on how biomedical enhancements will function, how they will be administered and to whom. Since only few enhancements are obtainable, it is difficult to tell whether these predictions are sound. Nevertheless, such warnings are extremely valuable. As a society we must, at the very least, be aware of developments that could have harmful (...)
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  28. Sally J. Scholz (2008). Political Solidarity. Penn State Press.score: 24.0
    introduction content or expectations of every form of solidarity, thereby identifying the traits that distinguish solidarity from camaraderie, community, association, and other social groupings. this marks solidarity as a morally rich concept for ...
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  29. Gerald J. Beyer (2007). A Theoretical Appreciation of the Ethic of Solidarity in Poland Twenty-Five Years After. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):207 - 232.score: 24.0
    The remarkable movement known as Solidarity recently celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary in Poland. This essay provides a theoretical appreciation of the values and principles that guided and undergirded the movement, which greatly contributed to the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe. This systematic overview of the ethic of the Solidarity movement fills a lacuna in the field of ethics because ethicists who are interested in the concept of solidarity have largely overlooked the Polish experience of (...)
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  30. Koen Lenaerts (2011). European Union Citizenship, National Welfare Systems and Social Solidarity. Jurisprudence 18 (2):397-422.score: 24.0
    The purpose of the present contribution is to explore how the ECJ seeks to respect the principles underpinning national welfare systems, notably social solidarity, whilst ensuring that Member States comply with the substantive law of the European Union, in particular with the Treaty provisions on the fundamental freedoms and EU citizenship. It is submitted that in order to reconcile those two interests the ECJ has taken the view that nationals of the host Member State must show a certain degree (...)
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  31. Åke Bergmark (2000). Solidarity in Swedish Welfare €“ Standing the Test of Time? Health Care Analysis 8 (4):395-411.score: 24.0
    Swedish welfare has for decades served as a role model foruniversalistic welfare. When the economic recession hit Swedish economyin the beginning of the 1990s, a period of more than 50 years ofcontinuous expansion and reforms in the welfare sector came to an end.Summing up the past decade, we can see that the economic downturnenforced rationing measures in most parts of the welfare state, althoughmost of this took place in the beginning of the decade. Today, most ofthe retrenchment has stopped and (...)
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  32. Alicia Ferreira Gonçalves & Joannes Paulus Silva Forte (2013). A Cáritas brasileira e a Economia Popular Solidária: O Agente de Cáritas e a Caridade Libertadora (Brazilian Caritas and the Popular Solidarity Economy: The Agent of Caritas and the Charity Liberating) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n32p1506. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (32):1506-1524.score: 24.0
    O presente artigo analisa as ligações entre a Cáritas Brasileira e a Economia Popular Solidária a partir do trabalho do Agente de Cáritas. A problemática central do artigo remete às representações sociais que esses Agentes constroem em seus relatos sobre os princípios da Teologia da Libertação que norteiam os projetos em economia solidária da referida instituição religiosa. A metodologia de base qualitativa e etnográfica consistiu na realização da revisão bibliográfica, consulta a materiais institucionais, observação in loco e entrevistas semiestruturadas com (...)
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  33. Shawn H. E. Harmon (2006). Solidarity: A (New) Ethic for Global Health Policy. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):215-236.score: 24.0
    This article explores solidarity as an ethical concept underpinning rules in the global health context. First, it considers the theoretical conceptualisation of the value and some specific duties it supports (ie: its expression in the broadest sense and its derivative action-guiding duties). Second, it considers the manifestation of solidarity in two international regulatory instruments. It concludes that, although solidarity is represented in these instruments, it is often incidental. This fact, their emphasis on other values and their internal (...)
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  34. Samuel A. Butler (2012). A Dialectic of Cooperation and Competition: Solidarity and Universal Health Care Provision. Bioethics 26 (7):351-360.score: 24.0
    The concept of solidarity has achieved relatively little attention from philosophers, in spite of its signal importance in a variety of social movements over the past 150 years. This means that there is a certain amount of preliminary philosophical work concerning the concept itself that must be undertaken before one can ask about its potential use in arguments concerning the provision of health care. In this paper, I begin with this work through a survey of some of the most (...)
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  35. Rob Houtepen & Ruud ter Meulen (2000). The Expectation(s) of Solidarity: Matters of Justice, Responsibility and Identity in the Reconstruction of the Health Care System. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (4):355-376.score: 24.0
    We analyse solidarity as a mixture of social justice on the onehand and a set of cultural values and ascriptions on the otherhand. The latter defines the relevant sense of belonging togetherin a society. From a short analysis of the early stages of theDutch welfare state, we conclude that social responsibility wasoriginally based in religious and political associations. In theheyday of the welfare state, institutions such as sick funds,hospitals or nursing homes became financed collectively entirelyand became accessible to people (...)
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  36. Indrė Špokienė (2010). The Concept of Solidarity and its Role in Health Care Regulation (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):329-348.score: 24.0
    The principle of solidarity is one of the fundamental legal principles applied in the field of health care regulation. This article analyses EU and Lithuanian legal acts, judicial practice, the doctrine of law and foreign scientific resources in order to reveal the content of solidarity principle and to discuss its role in the legal regulation of health care both at EU and national levels. The article is divided into three parts. The first part of the paper examines the (...)
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  37. Ruud ter Meulen & Katharine Wright (2012). Family Solidarity and Informal Care: The Case of Care for People with Dementia. Bioethics 26 (7):361-368.score: 24.0
    According to Bayertz the core meaning of solidarity is the perception of mutual obligations between the members of a community. This definition leaves open the various ways solidarity is perceived by individuals in different communities and how it manifests itself in a particular community. This paper explores solidarity as manifested in the context of families in respect of caregiving for a family member who has become dependent because of disease or illness. Though family caregiving is based on (...)
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  38. M. J. Trappenburg (2013). Active Solidarity and Its Discontents. Health Care Analysis:1-14.score: 24.0
    Traditional welfare states were based on passive solidarity. Able bodied, healthy minded citizens paid taxes and social premiums, usually according to a progressive taxation logic following the ability to pay principle. Elderly, fragile, weak, unhealthy and disabled citizens were taken care of in institutions, usually in quiet parts of the country (hills, woods, sea side). During the nineteen eighties and nineties of the twentieth century, ideas changed. Professionals, patients and policy makers felt that it would be better for the (...)
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  39. Hans-Georg Gadamer (2009). Friendship and Solidarity (1999). Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):3-12.score: 21.0
  40. Norman Geras (1995). Solidarity in the Conversation of Humankind: The Ungroundable Liberalism of Richard Rorty. Verso.score: 21.0
    Introduction This book aims at continuing a conversation. It takes for interlocutor a writer who is himself today indefatigable in engaging with the ideas ...
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  41. Arash Abizadeh (2005). Does Collective Identity Presuppose an Other: On the Alleged Incoherence of Global Solidarity. American Political Science Review 99 (1):45-60.score: 21.0
    Two arguments apparently support the thesis that collective identity presupposes an Other: the recognition argument, according to which seeing myself as a self requires recognition by an other whom I also recognize as a self (Hegel); and the dialogic argument, according to which my sense of self can only develop dialogically (Taylor). But applying these arguments to collective identity involves a compositional fallacy. Two modern ideologies mask the particularist thesis’s falsehood. The ideology of indivisible state sovereignty makes sovereignty as such (...)
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  42. David Wiggins, Solidarity and the Root of the Ethical.score: 21.0
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 2008, given by David Wiggins, a British philosopher.
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  43. B. Cadore, P. Boitte, G. Demuijnck, D. Greiner & D. Jacquemin (2000). Solidarity in Perinatal Medicine. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (4):435-454.score: 21.0
    In this paper it is argued that questions in perinatal medicine concerning treatment or non-treatment of severely handicapped children, after or before birth, cannot be answered solely by referring to the general aims and objectives of medical treatment and its specific deontology. Justifications of decisions about treatment and non-treatment need to be placed in a broader context of discussions about social justice and the social significance of medical practice as a whole.
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  44. Rogeer Hoedemaekers, Bert Gordijn & Martien Pijnenburg (2007). Solidarity and Justice as Guiding Principles in Genomic Research. Bioethics 21 (6):342–350.score: 21.0
  45. Rob Houtepen (2000). New Types of Solidarity in the European Welfare State. Health Care Analysis 8 (4):329-340.score: 21.0
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  46. Deana Jovanovic (2011). On Gender, Subjectivities and Experiences: Facing the Past and Feminist Politics of Solidarity. Filozofija I Društvo 22 (1):219-243.score: 21.0
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  47. Georgia Warnke (2012). Solidarity and Tradition in Gadamer's Hermeneutics. History and Theory 51 (4):6-22.score: 21.0
  48. Friedel Bolle & Alexander Kritikos (2006). Reciprocity, Altruism, Solidarity: A Dynamic Model. Theory and Decision 60 (4):371-394.score: 21.0
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  49. Vladimir Cervin (1956). Individual Behavior in Social Situations: Its Relation to Anxiety, Neuroticism, and Group Solidarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):161.score: 21.0
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  50. Sylvanus Ifeanyichukwu Nnoruka (2007). Solidarity, a Principle of Sociality: Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Approach in the Context of the Philosophy of Alfred Schutz and an African Culture. Iko - Verlag für Interkulturelle Kommunikation.score: 21.0
     
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