Search results for 'Solipsism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Buckle, Miracles Marvels, Mundane Order, Temporal Solipsism, Robert Kirk, Nonreductive Physicalism, Strict Implication, Donald Mertz Individuation, Instance Ontology & Dale E. Miller (2001). Index of Volume 79, 2001. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):594-596.score: 30.0
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  2. Living Alone & I. N. Solipsism (2005). Symposium: Wittgenstein, Solitude, and the Human Voice. Philosophy and Literature 29:409-427.score: 30.0
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  3. Of Solipsism (forthcoming). cuiiMwr wiMowcAis, OCT o L Lggg. European Journal of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  4. Lucy F. O'Brien (1996). Solipsism and Self-Reference. European Journal Of Philosophy 4 (2):175-194.score: 18.0
    In this paper I want to propose that we see solipsism as arising from certain problems we have about identifying ourselves as subjects in an objective world. The discussion will centre on Wittgenstein.
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  5. Katherine J. Morris (1984). In Defense of Methodological Solipsism: A Reply to Noonan. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):399-412.score: 18.0
    Noonan's arguments against methodological solipsism ("methodological solipsism," "philosophical studies" 4, 1981) assumes that mental states are individuated by (russellian) content; this assumption entails that narrowness and wideness are intrinsic to mental states. I propose an alternative "extrinsic" reading of methodological solipsism, According to which narrowness and wideness are modes of attribution of mental states, And thus reject the doctrine of individuation by russellian content. Noonan's arguments fail against this version of methodological solipsism.
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  6. J. Christopher Maloney (1985). Methodological Solipsism Reconsidered as a Research Strategy in Cognitive Psychology. Philosophy of Science 52 (September):451-69.score: 18.0
    Current computational psychology, especially as described by Fodor (1975, 1980, 1981), Pylyshyn (1980), and Stich (1983), is both a bold, promising program for cognitive science and an alternative to naturalistic psychology (Putnam 1975). Whereas naturalistic psychology depends on the general scientific framework to fix the meanings of general terms and, hence, the content of thoughts utilizing or expressed in those terms, computational cognitive theory banishes semantical considerations in psychological investigations, embracing methodological, not ontological, solipsism. I intend to argue that (...)
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  7. Raimo Tuomela (1989). Methodological Solipsism and Explanation in Psychology. Philosophy of Science 56 (March):23-47.score: 18.0
    This paper is a discussion of the tenability of methodological solipsism, which typically relies on the so-called Explanatory Thesis. The main arguments in the paper are directed against the latter thesis, according to which internal (or autonomous or narrow) psychological states as opposed to noninternal ones suffice for explanation in psychology. Especially, feedback-based actions are argued to require indispensable reference to noninternal explanantia, often to explanatory common causes. Thus, to the extent that methodological solipsism is taken to require (...)
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  8. Jeremy E. Henkel (2011). How to Avoid Solipsism While Remaining an Idealist: Lessons From Berkeley and Dharmakīrti. Comparative Philosophy 3 (1).score: 18.0
    This essay examines the strategies that Berkeley and Dharmakīrti utilize to deny that idealism entails solipsism. Beginning from similar arguments for the non-existence of matter, the two philosophers employ markedly different strategies for establishing the existence of other minds. This difference stems from their responses to the problem of intersubjective agreement. While Berkeley’s reliance on his Cartesian inheritance does allow him to account for intersubjective agreement without descending into solipsism, it nevertheless prevents him from establishing the existence of (...)
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  9. Ausonio Marras (1985). The Churchlands on Methodological Solipsism and Computational Psychology. Philosophy of Science 52 (June):295-309.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses a recent argument of the Churchlands against the "linguistic-rationalist" tradition exemplified by current cognitive-computational psychology. Because of its commitment to methodological solipsism--the argument goes--computational psychology cannot provide an account of how organisms are able to represent and "hook up to" the world. First I attempt to determine the exact nature of this charge and its relation to the Churchlands' long-standing polemic against 'folk psychology' and the linguistic-rationalist methodology. I then turn my attention to the Churchlands' account (...)
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  10. Takashi Yagisawa (1993). The Cost of Meaning Solipsism. In Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest LaPore (eds.), Holism: A Consumer Update. Amsterdam: Rodopi. 213-230.score: 18.0
    Meaning Solipsism says that it is possible for there to be a meaningful state without any other meaningful state. The meaning of such a solo meaningful state should be non-natural. The best strategy for establishing Meaning Solipsism is to argue for the determination of the meaning of a possible solo meaningful state via the set of entities the meaning of the state fits. Embracing merely possible and impossible entities is the most straightforward way to do so. Also, a (...)
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  11. Josef Parnas & Louis A. Sass (2001). Self, Solipsism, and Schizophrenic Delusions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):101-120.score: 15.0
  12. Stephen P. Thornton, Solipsism and the Problem of Other Minds. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  13. Harold W. Noonan (1981). Methodological Solipsism. Philosophical Studies 40 (September):269-274.score: 15.0
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  14. Mark Rowlands (1995). Against Methodological Solipsism: The Ecological Approach. Philosophical Psychology 8 (1):5-24.score: 15.0
    This paper argues that an ecological approach to psychology of the sort advanced by J. J. Gibson provides a coherent and powerful alternative to the computational, information-processing, paradigm. The paper argues for two principles. Firstly, one cannot begin to understand what internal information processing an organism must accomplish until one understands what information is available to the organism in its environment. Secondly, an organism can process information by acting on or manipulating physical structures in its environment. An attempt is made (...)
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  15. Michael Ridge (2001). Taking Solipsism Seriously: Nonhuman Animals and Meta-Cognitive Theories of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 103 (3):315-340.score: 15.0
  16. Harold W. Noonan (1984). Methodological Solipsism: A Reply to Morris. Philosophical Studies 48 (September):285-290.score: 15.0
  17. J. Christopher Maloney (1991). Saving Psychological Solipsism. Philosophical Studies 61 (March):267-83.score: 15.0
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  18. Mark Rowlands (1991). Towards a Reasonable Version of Methodological Solipsism. Mind and Language 6 (1):39-57.score: 15.0
  19. J. A. Fodor (1980). Methodological Solipsism Considered as a Research Strategy in Cognitive Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):63.score: 15.0
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  20. Kent Bach (1982). "De Re" Belief and Methodological Solipsism. In Andrew Woodfield (ed.), Thought And Object: Essays On Intentionality. Clarendon Press.score: 15.0
  21. Margaret Simonton (1996). Nabokov, Vian, and Kharms: From Solipsism to Dialogue. P. Lang.score: 15.0
     
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  22. E. Teensma (1974). Solipsism and Induction. Assen,Van Gorcum.score: 15.0
     
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  23. William Lewis Todd (1969). Analytical Solipsism. The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff.score: 15.0
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  24. Pete Mandik (2007). Picturing, Showing, and Solipsism in Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. Analysis and Metaphysics 6 (1).score: 12.0
    Of all the enigmatic remarks running through Wittgensteinís Tractatus, none are a greater source of puzzlement to this reader than the endorsement of solipsism in 5.6-5.641. Wittgenstein writes ìI am my worldî, but, even though ìwhat solipsism means, is quite correct...it cannot be said, but it shows itselfî (5.63; 5.62). More intriguing still, he writes.
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  25. Irwin Goldstein (2007). Solipsism and the Solitary Language User. Philosophical Papers 36 (1):35-47.score: 12.0
    A person skeptical about other minds supposes it is possible in principle that there are no minds other than his. A person skeptical about an external world thinks it is possible there is no world external to him. Some philosophers think a person can refute the skeptic and prove that his world is not the solitary scenario the skeptic supposes might be realized. In this paper I examine one argument that some people think refutes solipsism. The argument, from Wittgenstein, (...)
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  26. Jaakko Hintikka (1958). On Wittgenstein's `Solipsism'. Mind 67 (265):88-91.score: 12.0
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  27. Michael Kremer, To What Extent is Solipsism a Truth?score: 12.0
    My title1 is taken from one of the most obscure, and most discussed, sections of an already obscure and much discussed work, the discussion of the self, the world, and solipsism in sections 5.6-5.641 of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico- Philosophicus.2 Wittgenstein writes: 5.6 The limits of my language mean the limits of my world. 5.61 Logic fills the world: the limits of the world are also its limits. We cannot therefore say in logic: This and this there is in (...)
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  28. Edward H. Minar (1998). Wittgenstein on the Metaphysics of the Self: The Dialectic of Solipsism in Philosophical Investigations. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (4):329–354.score: 12.0
    Wittgenstein's later efforts to exorcise the attractions of solipsism involve descriptions of the uses of 'I' which may be taken to show that 'I' does not refer in its philosophically most salient uses. This point of "grammar," however, would not by itself provide a direct refutation of solipsism; _Philosophical Investigations, Sections 398-410, of which this paper is a reading, traces a complex dialectic by which Wittgenstein elicits and questions the solipsist's commitments. In challenging the intelligibility of the solipsist's (...)
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  29. Lucy O'Brien, Final Version: O'Brien, L. F. (1996), 'Solipsism and Self-Reference', European Journal of Philosophy 4:175-194.score: 12.0
    In this paper I want to propose that we see solipsism as arising from certain problems we have about identifying ourselves as subjects in an objective world. The discussion will centre on Wittgenstein’s treatment of solipsism in his Tractatus Logico- Philosophicus. In that work Wittgenstein can be seen to express an unusually profound understanding of the problems faced in trying to give an account of how we, who are subjects, identify ourselves as objects (...)
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  30. Robert Stern (2012). Is Hegel's Master–Slave Dialectic a Refutation of Solipsism? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):333-361.score: 12.0
    This paper considers whether Hegel's master/slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit should be considered as a refutation of solipsism. It focuses on a recent and detailed attempt to argue for this sort of reading that has been proposed by Frederick Beiser ? but it argues that this reading is unconvincing, both in the historical motivations given for it in the work of Jacobi and Fichte, and as an interpretation of the text itself. An alternative reading of the dialectic (...)
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  31. H. O. Mounce (1997). Philosophy, Solipsism and Thought. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (186):1–18.score: 12.0
    Wittgenstein's view of philosophy in the Tractatus presupposes that thought may be revealed without remainder in the use of signs. It is commonly held, however, that in the Tractatus he treated thought as logically prior to language. If this view, expressed most lucidly by Norman Malcolm, were correct, Wittgenstein would be inconsistent in holding that thought can be revealed without remainder in the use of signs. I argue that this is not correct. Thought may be prior to language in time (...)
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  32. Ian I. Mitroff (1971). Solipsism: An Essay in Psychological Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 38 (3):376-394.score: 12.0
    The thesis of this paper is that in dealing with problems of "mind," the philosopher of mind needs to be as well grounded in his relevant sciences (e.g. psychology, anthropology) as the philosopher of the physical sciences needs to be grounded in his relevant sciences (e.g. physics). The thesis of this paper is also that the psychological analysis of solipsism and the philosophical analysis are not independent (or at least not independent in all of their aspects), and that therefore (...)
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  33. Saul Traiger, Solipsism, Individualism and Cognitive Science.score: 12.0
    Solipsism, Individualism and Cognitive Science [1] "Artificial Intelligence cannot ignore philosophy" - John McCarthy (McCarthy 1988) I shall challenge the claim that Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Intelligence, or GOFAI (Haugeland 1985) is solipsistic while more recent neural or "brain-style" approaches to AI are not. (Rumelhart et. al. 1986) After distinguishing GOFAI from connectionism, I will first show that GOFAI is not committed to solipsism but rather to what is more properly called individualism.
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  34. Włodzimierz Heflik (2011). Subject: Construct or Acting Being? The Status of the Subject and the Problem of Solipsism in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus. ARGUMENT 1 (1):49-67.score: 12.0
    In his Tractatus and Notebooks 1914-1916, Wittgenstein develops some themes concerning the nature of the subject, transcendentalism, solipsism and mysticism. Though Wittgenstein rejects a naive, psychological understanding of the subject, he preserves the idea of the metaphysical subject, so-called “philosophical I”. The present investigations exhibit two ways of grasping the subject: (1) subject as a boundary (of the world); (2) subject (I) as the world. The author of the paper aims to analyze different methods of conceiving the subject, both (...)
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  35. Miriam Franchella (1995). Like a Bee on a Windowpane: Heyting's Reflections on Solipsism. Synthese 105 (2):207 - 251.score: 12.0
    This paper presents the content of the unpublished notes that the Dutch mathematician Arend Heyting wrote in different periods of his life on solipsism and that are preserved in Heyting's archive at the University of Amsterdam. Most of the notes are quoted here and translated into English. Their study shows the originality of Heyting's reflections on a subject that was typical of his master, L. E. J. Brouwer, the father of intuitionism.
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  36. Brook Ziporyn (2012). Spinoza and the Self-Overcoming of Solipsism. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):125 - 140.score: 12.0
    Spinoza, as a monist and a rationalist, seems unlikely to have occasion to confront any form of the solipsism problem. However, a close examination of his epistemology reveals that he does in fact confront a very radical form of this problem, and offers an equally radical solution to it, derived from the very epistemological premises that make it a potential problem for him. In particular, we find that the conception of the mind as the “idea of the body,” premised (...)
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  37. Albert A. Johnstone (1991). Rationalized Epistemology: Taking Solipsism Seriously. State University of New York Press.score: 12.0
    Roughly characterized, solipsism is the skeptical thesis that there is no reason to think that anything exists other than oneself and one’s present experience. Since its inception in the reflections of Descartes, the thesis has taken three broad and sometimes overlapping forms: Internal World Solipsism that arises from an account of perception in terms of representations of an external world; Observed World Solipsism that arises from doubts as to the existence of what is not actually present sensuously (...)
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  38. Daniel King (2004). Methodological Solipsism and the Multiverse. Philosophy Today 48 (3):255-263.score: 12.0
    "Methodological Solipsism and the Multiverse" defends the many-universes interpretation of quantum physics, but draws attention to a major philosophical obstacle to the interpretation's acceptance: the question of why, if there are many universes, all on a par with one another, at a particular time the 'I' is manifest in only one. This is known as the 'preferred basis' problem. The so-called methodological solipsism approach, introduced by Driesch and employed by philosophers, such as Putnam and Fodor, is used to (...)
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  39. Roy W. Perrett (1981). Solipsism and Religious Belief. Sophia 20 (3):17-26.score: 12.0
    In "arguments for the existence of god" and "faith and knowledge", john hick argues for the rationality of religious belief on the basis of an analogy between religious and perceptual belief. i reply that the analogy does not obtain because there is no alternative solipsistic interpretation of perceptual belief possible. this is because (a) hick's phenomenology of dreaming is unsatisfactory and (b) wittgenstein's "private language" argument shows solipsism to be an unintelligible option.
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  40. Andries Gouws & Paul Cilliers (2001). Freud's “Project”, Distributed Systems, and Solipsism. South African Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):1-21.score: 10.0
    This paper discusses Freud's model of the psychical apparatus in the “Project”, and concludes that it is a remarkably sophisticated work which even today is still highly relevant to neuropsychological theorising. Freud rejects the notion that what happens in the brain can be clearly localised in space and time. This anticipates the notion of a distributed system found in recent developments in computing (“neural net works”) and in Derrida's conception of systems characterised by différance. Every part of such a system (...)
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  41. Steffen Borge (1999). All You Zombies. David Chalmers’ Metaphysical Solipsism. In Uwe Meixner Peter Simons (ed.), Metaphysics in the Post-Metaphysical Age. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 9.0
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  42. Hao Tang (2011). Transcendental Idealism in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):598-607.score: 9.0
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus contains an insubstantial form of transcendental idealism. It is insubstantial because it rejects the substantial a priori. Yet despite this, the Tractatus still contains two fundamental transcendental idealist insights, (a) the identity of form between thought and reality, and (b) the transcendental unity of apperception. I argue for (a) by connecting general themes in the Tractatus and in Kant, and for (b) by giving a detailed interpretation of Tractatus 5.6ff., where Wittgenstein talks about solipsism and the metaphysical (...)
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  43. Peter M. Sullivan (1996). The 'Truth' in Solipsism, and Wittgenstein's Rejection of the A Priori. European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):195-220.score: 9.0
  44. Jennifer Hornsby, Louise Antony, Jennifer Saul, Natalie Stoljar, Nellie Wieland & Rae Langton (2012). Review Symposium: Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. Jurisprudence 2 (2):379-440.score: 9.0
  45. Kathleen Wider (1990). Overtones of Solipsism in Thomas Nagel's "What is It Like to Be a Bat?" And the View From Nowhere. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (3):481-499.score: 9.0
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  46. Nicholas L. Sturgeon (1974). Altruism, Solipsism, and the Objectivity of Reasons. Philosophical Review 83 (3):374-402.score: 9.0
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  47. Amy E. White (2010). Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):413-423.score: 9.0
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  48. Louis A. Sass (1994). "My So-Called Delusions": Solipsism, Madness, and the Schreber Case. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 25 (1):70-103.score: 9.0
  49. P. Gilbert (2010). Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification * by Rae Langton. Analysis 70 (3):597-599.score: 9.0
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  50. Kieran Bonner (1994). Hermeneutics and Symbolic Interactionism: The Problem of Solipsism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (2):225 - 249.score: 9.0
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