Search results for 'Solomon Goldman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert C. Solomon (2005). Introducing Philosophy: A Text with Integrated Readings. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy is an exciting and accessible subject, and this engaging text acquaints students with the core problems of philosophy and the many ways in which they are and have been answered. Introducing Philosophy: A Text with Integrated Readings, Eighth Edition, insists both that philosophy is very much alive today and that it is deeply rooted in the past. Accordingly, it combines substantial original sources from significant works in the history of philosophy and current philosophy with detailed commentary and explanation that (...)
     
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  2. Solomon Goldman (1973). The Jew and the Universe. New York,Arno Press.
     
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  3.  58
    Gerhard Schurz, Markus Werning & Alvin I. Goldman (eds.) (2009). Reliable Knowledge and Social Epistemology: Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Goldman and Replies by Goldman. Rodopi.
    The volume contains the written versions of all papers given at the workshop, divided into five chapters and followed by Alvin Goldman¿s replies in the sixth ...
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  4.  11
    Harry S. Silverstein & Holly S. Goldman (1976). Goldman's 'Level-2' Act Descriptions and Utilitarian Generalization. Philosophical Studies 30 (1):45 - 55.
  5.  1
    Robert C. Solomon (1976). Is There Happiness After Death?: Robert C. Solomon. Philosophy 51 (196):189-193.
    Must no one at all, then, be called happy while he lives; must we, as Solon says, see the end? Even if we are to lay down this doctrine, is it also the case that a man is happy when he is dead ? Or is not this quite absurd, especially for us who say that happiness is an activity? But if we do not call the dead man happy, and if Solon does not mean this, but that one can (...)
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  6. A. Goldman (1991). Goldman on Interpreting Art and Literature+ Reply to Stecker. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (3):246-247.
     
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  7.  7
    Miriam Solomon (1995). Naturalism and Generality. Philosophical Psychology 8 (4):353 – 363.
    Naturalistic epistemologists frequently assume that their aim is to identify generalities (i.e. general laws) about the effectiveness of particular reasoning processes and methods. This paper argues that the search for this kind of generality fails. Work that has been done thus far to identify generalities (e.g. by Goldman, Kitcher and Thagard) overlooks both the complexity of reasoning and the relativity of assessments to particular contexts (domain, stage and goal of inquiry). Examples of human reasoning which show both complexity and (...)
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  8. A. Goldman (2006). Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading. Oxford University Press.
    People are minded creatures; we have thoughts, feelings and emotions. More intriguingly, we grasp our own mental states, and conduct the business of ascribing them to ourselves and others without instruction in formal psychology. How do we do this? And what are the dimensions of our grasp of the mental realm? In this book, Alvin I. Goldman explores these questions with the tools of philosophy, developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. He refines an approach called simulation theory, which (...)
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  9. Alvin I. Goldman (1999). Knowledge in a Social World. Oxford University Press.
    Knowledge in a Social World offers a philosophy for the information age. Alvin Goldman explores new frontiers by creating a thoroughgoing social epistemology, moving beyond the traditional focus on solitary knowers. Against the tides of postmodernism and social constructionism Goldman defends the integrity of truth and shows how to promote it by well-designed forms of social interaction. From science to education, from law to democracy, he shows why and how public institutions should seek knowledge-enhancing practices. The result is (...)
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  10. Robert C. Solomon (1992). Ethics and Excellence: Cooperation and Integrity in Business. Oxford University Press.
    The Greek philosopher Aristotle, writing over two thousand years before Wall Street, called people who engaged in activities which did not contribute to society "parasites." In his latest work, renowned scholar Robert C. Solomon asserts that though capitalism may require capital, but it does not require, much less should it be defined by the parasites it inevitably attracts. Capitalism has succeeded not with brute strength or because it has made people rich, but because it has produced responsible citizens and--however (...)
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  11. Robert C. Solomon (1999). A Better Way to Think About Business: How Personal Integrity Leads to Corporate Success. Oxford University Press.
    Is business ethics a contradiction in terms? Absolutely not, says Robert Solomon. In fact, he maintains that sound ethics is a necessary precondition of any long-term business enterprise, and that excellence in business must exist on the foundation of values that most of us hold dear. Drawing on twenty years of experience consulting with major corporations on ethics, Solomon clarifies the difficult ethical choices all people in business are faced with from time to time. He takes an "Aristotelian" (...)
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  12.  49
    Alvin I. Goldman (2002). Pathways to Knowledge: Private and Public. Oxford University Press.
    How can we know? How can we attain justified belief? These traditional questions in epistemology have inspired philosophers for centuries. Now, in this exceptional work, Alvin Goldman, distinguished scholar and leader in the fields of epistemology and mind, approaches such inquiries as legitimate methods or "pathways" to knowledge. He examines the notion of private and public knowledge, arguing for the epistemic legitimacy of private and introspective methods of gaining knowledge, yet acknowledging the equal importance of social and public mechanisms (...)
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  13.  18
    Alan H. Goldman, Learning From Books.
    Alan H. Goldman on the philosophical value of the novel.
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  14. Robert C. Solomon (ed.) (2004). Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers since Aristotle have explored emotion, and the study of emotion has always been essential to the love of wisdom. In recent years Anglo-American philosophers have rediscovered and placed new emphasis on this very old discipline. The view that emotions are ripe for philosophical analysis has been supported by a considerable number of excellent publications. In this volume, Robert Solomon brings together some of the best Anglo-American philosophers now writing on the philosophy of emotion, with chapters from philosophers who (...)
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  15. Robert C. Solomon (2007). True To Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us. Oxford University Press.
    We live our lives through our emotions, writes Robert Solomon, and it is our emotions that give our lives meaning. What interests or fascinates us, who we love, what angers us, what moves us, what bores us--all of this defines us, gives us character, constitutes who we are. In True to Our Feelings, Solomon illuminates the rich life of the emotions--why we don't really understand them, what they really are, and how they make us human and give meaning (...)
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  16. Robert C. Solomon (2003). Not Passion's Slave: Emotions and Choice. Oxford University Press.
    Not Passion's Slave is a collection of Solomon's most significant essay-length publications on the nature of emotions over the past twenty-five years. He develops two essential themes throughout the volume: firstly, he presents a "cognitive" theory of emotions in which emotions are construed primarily as evaluative judgments; secondly, he proposes an "existentialist" perspective in which he defends the idea that we are responsible for our emotions and, in a limited sense, "choose" them. The final section presents his current philosophical (...)
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  17.  41
    Alvin I. Goldman (1993). Philosophical Applications of Cognitive Science. Westview Press.
    One of the most fruitful interdisciplinary boundaries in contemporary scholarship is that between philosophy and cognitive science. Now that solid empirical results about the activities of the human mind are available, it is no longer necessary for philosophers to practice armchair psychology.In this short, accessible, and entertaining book, Alvin Goldman presents a masterly survey of recent work in cognitive science that has particular relevance to philosophy. Besides providing a valuable review of the most suggestive work in cognitive and social (...)
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  18.  49
    Alan H. Goldman (2009). Reasons From Within: Desires and Values. Oxford University Press.
    Alan H. Goldman argues for the internalist or subjectivist view of practical reasons on the grounds that it is simpler, more unified, and more comprehensible ...
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  19.  10
    Alan H. Goldman (1992). Empirical Knowledge. Philosophical Review 101 (2):428-430.
    This remarkably clear and comprehensive account of empirical knowledge will be valuable to all students of epistemology and philosophy. The author begins from an explanationist analysis of knowing—a belief counts as knowledge if, and only if, its truth enters into the best explanation for its being held. Defending common sense and scientific realism within the explanationist framework, Alan Goldman provides a new foundational approach to justification. The view that emerges is broadly empiricist, counteracting the recently dominant trend that rejects (...)
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  20.  19
    Alvin I. Goldman (2013). Joint Ventures: Mindreading, Mirroring, and Embodied Cognition. OUP Usa.
    This collection of essays by Alvin Goldman explores an array of topics in the philosophy of cognitive science, ranging from embodied cognition to the metaphysics of actions and events.
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  21.  46
    Alan H. Goldman (1995). Aesthetic Value. Westview Press.
    At the heart of aesthetics lie fundamental questions about value in art and the objectivity of aesthetic valuation. A theory of aesthetic value must explain how the properties of artworks contribute to the values derived from contemplating and appreciating works of art. When someone passes judgment on a work of art, just what is it that is happening, and how can such judgments be criticized and defended?In this concise survey, intended for advanced undergraduate students of aesthetics, Alan Goldman focuses (...)
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  22.  83
    Robert C. Solomon (2004). In Defense of Sentimentality. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy has as much to do with feelings as it does with thoughts and thinking. Philosophy, accordingly, requires not only emotional sensitivity but an understanding of the emotions, not as curious but marginal psychological phenomena but as the very substance of life. In this, the second book in a series devoted to his work on the emotions, Robert Solomon presents a defense of the emotions and of sentimentality against the background of what he perceives as a long history of (...)
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  23.  19
    Robert C. Solomon (1999). The Joy of Philosophy: Thinking Thin Versus the Passionate Life. Oxford University Press.
    The Joy of Philosophy is a return to some of the perennial questions of philosophy--questions about the meaning of life; about death and tragedy; about the respective roles of rationality and passion in the good life; about love, compassion, and revenge; about honesty, deception, and betrayal; and about who we are and how we think about who we are. Recapturing the heart-felt confusion and excitement that originally brings us all to philosophy, internationally renowned teacher and lecturer Robert C. Solomon (...)
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  24.  24
    Robert C. Solomon (2003). Living with Nietzsche: What the Great "Immoralist" has to Teach Us. Oxford University Press.
    Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the most popular and controversial philosophers of the last 150 years. Narcissistic, idiosyncratic, hyperbolic, irreverent--never has a philosopher been appropriated, deconstructed, and scrutinized by such a disparate array of groups, movements, and schools of thought. Adored by many for his passionate ideas and iconoclastic style, he is also vilified for his lack of rigor, apparent cruelty, and disdain for moral decency. In Living with Nietzsche, Solomon suggests that we read Nietzsche from a very different (...)
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  25. Robert C. Solomon (1988). Continental Philosophy Since 1750: The Rise and Fall of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    The flowering of creative and speculative philosophy that emerged in modern Europe--particularly in Germany--is a thrilling adventure story as well as an essential chapter in the history of philosophy. In this integrative narrative, Solomon provides an accessible introduction to the major authors and movements of modern European philosophy, including the Enlightenment and Romanticism, Rousseau, German Idealism, Kant, Fichte, Schelling and the Romantics, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Max Brentano, Meinong, Frege, Dilthey, Bergson, Nietzsche, Husserl, Freud, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, hermeneutics, Sartre, Postmodernism, (...)
     
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  26.  33
    Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  27. Alan H. Goldman (2009). Reasons From Within: Desires and Values. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Do the reasons we have for acting as we do derive from our concerns and desires, or are there objective values in the world that we are rationally required to pursue and protect? Alan Goldman argues for the internalist or subjectivist view of practical reasons on the grounds that it is simpler, more unified, and more comprehensible than the rival objectivist position. He provides a naturalistic account of practical rationality in terms of coherence within sets of desires or motivational (...)
     
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  28.  19
    Alvin I. Goldman (2009). Précis of "Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading". Philosophical Studies 144 (3):431 - 434.
    This article focuses on, and critiques, Goldman's view that third-person mind-reading is grounded in first-person introspection. It argues, on the contrary, that first-person awareness of propositional attitude events is always interpretative, resulting from us turning our mind-reading abilities upon ourselves.
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  29.  11
    Robert C. Solomon (ed.) (1972). Phenomenology and Existentialism. Littlefield Adams Quality Paperbacks.
    Among the contributors are Frege, Chisholm, Merleau-Ponty, Schmitt, Tillman, Gendlin, Sellars, Linsky, Dreyfus, Ryle, Solomon, Schlick, Ricoeur, Marcel, ...
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  30.  29
    Alan H. Goldman (2001). Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. Cambridge University Press.
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the current literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan Goldman (...)
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  31.  2
    Robert C. Solomon, William Gass, Don Herzog, William Miller, Jerry Neu, James Ogilvy, Thomas Pynchon & Elizabeth Spelman (2000). Wicked Pleasures: Meditations on the Seven 'Deadly' Sins. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The seven deadly sins have provided gossip, amusement, and the plots of morality plays for nearly fifteen hundred years. In Wicked Pleasures, well-known philosopher, business ethicist, and admitted sinner Robert C. Solomon brings together a varied group of contributors for a new look at the old catalogue of sins. Solomon introduces the sins as a group, noting their popularity and pervasiveness. From the formation of the canon by Pope Gregory the Great, the seven have survived the sermonizing of (...)
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  32.  15
    Robert C. Solomon (1987). From Hegel to Existentialism. Oxford University Press.
    Robert Solomon, widely recognized as a leading authority of continental philosophy and respected as a philosopher in his own right, here brings together twelve of his published articles focusing on key issues in the writings of major continental philosophers including Hegel, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Camus. The essays not only shed light on the thought and interrelations of these writers, but also develop a set of provocative and forcefully argued original theses, and encapsulate some of the central ideas of (...)
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  33.  3
    Robert C. Solomon (1972). Wittgenstein and Cartesian Privacy. Philosophy Today 16 (3):163-179.
    Robert Solomon's essay makes interesting reading against the background of the current efforts to find common ground between continental philosophersand the British and American philosophers. His article begins with a central point in analytic-linguistic philosophy. Soon it becomes a confrontation withphenomenology and eventually a confrontation of issues within phenomenology.
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  34.  5
    Maynard Solomon (1991). Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: The Sense of an Ending. Critical Inquiry 17 (2):289-305.
    The question of what constitutes a finished work is thrown open, reminding us that in certain of his completed autographs Beethoven continued the process that he normally reserved for the earlier stages of composition, setting out further choices, possibilities, and interchangeabilities, including radical alterations in goal as well as detail. In particular, the revision of movement endings was one of his long-standing preoccupations. In works of his middle period, Emil Platen observed, Beethoven continued to make essential alterations in the closing (...)
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  35.  44
    Robert C. Solomon (1972). From Rationalism to Existentialism: The Existentialists and Their Nineteenth-Century Backgrounds. Littlefield Adams Quality Paperbacks.
    In this enduring text, renowned philosopher Robert C. Solomon provides students with a detailed introduction to modern existentialism.
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  36.  1
    Alvin Goldman (2012). Episteme: A New Self-Definition. Episteme 9 (1):1-2.
    Editorial Alvin Goldman, Episteme, FirstView Article.
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  37. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book's thirty essays explore philosophically the nature and morality of sexual perversion, cybersex, masturbation, homosexuality, contraception, same-sex marriage, promiscuity, pedophilia, date rape, sexual objectification, teacher-student relationships, pornography, and prostitution. Authors include Martha Nussbaum, Thomas Nagel, Alan Goldman, John Finnis, Sallie Tisdale, Robin West, Alan Wertheimer, John Corvino, Cheshire Calhoun, Jerome Neu, and Alan Soble, among others. A valuable resource for sex researchers as well as undergraduate courses in the philosophy of sex.
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  38. Alan H. Goldman (1991). Empirical Knowledge. University of California Press.
    This remarkably clear and comprehensive account of empirical knowledge will be valuable to all students of epistemology and philosophy. The author begins from an explanationist analysis of knowing—a belief counts as knowledge if, and only if, its truth enters into the best explanation for its being held. Defending common sense and scientific realism within the explanationist framework, Alan Goldman provides a new foundational approach to justification. The view that emerges is broadly empiricist, counteracting the recently dominant trend that rejects (...)
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  39.  3
    Avery Goldman (2012). Kant and the Subject of Critique: On the Regulative Role of the Psychological Idea. Indiana University Press.
    Immanuel Kant is strict about the limits of self-knowledge: our inner sense gives us only appearances, never the reality, of ourselves. Kant may seem to begin his inquiries with an uncritical conception of cognitive limits, but in Kant and the Subject of Critique, Avery Goldman argues that, even for Kant, a reflective act must take place before any judgment occurs. Building on Kant’s metaphysics, which uses the soul, the world, and God as regulative principles, Goldman demonstrates how Kant (...)
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  40.  2
    Avery Goldman (2012). Kant and the Subject of Critique: On the Regulative Role of the Psychological Idea. Indiana University Press.
    Immanuel Kant is strict about the limits of self-knowledge: our inner sense gives us only appearances, never the reality, of ourselves. Kant may seem to begin his inquiries with an uncritical conception of cognitive limits, but in Kant and the Subject of Critique, Avery Goldman argues that, even for Kant, a reflective act must take place before any judgment occurs. Building on Kant’s metaphysics, which uses the soul, the world, and God as regulative principles, Goldman demonstrates how Kant (...)
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  41.  2
    Avery Goldman (2012). Kant and the Subject of Critique: On the Regulative Role of the Psychological Idea. Indiana University Press.
    Immanuel Kant is strict about the limits of self-knowledge: our inner sense gives us only appearances, never the reality, of ourselves. Kant may seem to begin his inquiries with an uncritical conception of cognitive limits, but in Kant and the Subject of Critique, Avery Goldman argues that, even for Kant, a reflective act must take place before any judgment occurs. Building on Kant’s metaphysics, which uses the soul, the world, and God as regulative principles, Goldman demonstrates how Kant (...)
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  42. Harvey Goldman (1988). Max Weber and Thomas Mann: Calling and the Shaping of the Self. University of California Press.
    Though they worked in very different disciplines, Max Weber and Thomas Mann were engaged from early in their careers in a remarkably similar enterprise converging on questions of personal identity and national self-understanding, and built upon conceptions drawn from a common intellectual and national heritage. Harvey Goldman's ambitious new book is about a part of that enterprise, the foundation of their understanding of the relation of self and work as set out in Weber's essays on religion and Mann's pre-World (...)
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  43. Harvey Goldman (1991). Max Weber and Thomas Mann: Calling and the Shaping of the Self. University of California Press.
    Though they worked in very different disciplines, Max Weber and Thomas Mann were engaged from early in their careers in a remarkably similar enterprise converging on questions of personal identity and national self-understanding, and built upon conceptions drawn from a common intellectual and national heritage. Harvey Goldman's ambitious new book is about a part of that enterprise, the foundation of their understanding of the relation of self and work as set out in Weber's essays on religion and Mann's pre-World (...)
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  44. Alan H. Goldman (2005). Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. Cambridge University Press.
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan Goldman provides (...)
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  45. Alan H. Goldman (2007). Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. Cambridge University Press.
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan Goldman provides (...)
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  46. Alan H. Goldman (2007). Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. Cambridge University Press.
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan Goldman provides (...)
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  47. Alvin L. Goldman (2008). Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading. OUP Usa.
    People are minded creatures; we have thoughts, feelings and emotions. More intriguingly, we grasp our own mental states, and conduct the business of ascribing them to ourselves and others without instruction in formal psychology. How do we do this? And what are the dimensions of our grasp of the mental realm? In this book, Alvin I. Goldman explores these questions with the tools of philosophy, developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. He refines an approach called simulation theory, which (...)
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  48. Alvin I. Goldman (2006). Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading. OUP Usa.
    In this study, Goldman argues that simulation is intensively used in mindreading tasks, from recognizing emotion in faces to assigning conceptual contents to thoughts. Psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and philosophy are applied to questions of third- and first- person mindreading, as well as mental concepts, moral psychology and other topics in social cognition.
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  49. Alvin I. Goldman (2006). Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading. Oxford University Press Usa.
    People are minded creatures; we have thoughts, feelings and emotions. More intriguingly, we grasp our own mental states, and conduct the business of ascribing them to ourselves and others without instruction in formal psychology. How do we do this? And what are the dimensions of our grasp of the mental realm? In this book, Alvin I. Goldman explores these questions with the tools of philosophy, developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. He refines an approach called simulation theory, which (...)
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  50. Ken Knisely, Robert Solomon, Verna Gehring & John Loughney (forthcoming). About Love: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed. DVD.
    A rigorous and wide-ranging discussion of the most ballyhooed emotion of all--and its surprising role in making us who we are. With Robert Solomon, Verna Gehring, and John Loughney.
     
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