7 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Sonja Madeleine Tanner (University of Colorado, Colorado Springs)
  1.  6
    Geoff Ashton & Sonja Tanner (2016). From Puzzling Pleasures to Moral Practices: Aristotle and Abhinavagupta on the Aesthetics and Ethics of Tragedy. Philosophy East and West 66 (1):13-39.
    For well over a thousand years, countless audiences have taken pleasure in watching unfold the following fearful event:Filled with dread, desperately tossing unchewed grass from its mouth, looking back at the hunting king, a beautiful deer springs into flight to escape a fast-approaching chariot from which repeated arrows fly — one of which will inevitably lodge in the deer’s defenseless body. This is not a scene from “National Geographic” or an episode from some sadly popular TV hunting show. Indeed, this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  2
    Sonja Tanner (2016). Prostrating Before Adrasteia. Angelaki 21 (3):35-53.
    Comedy and philosophy have too often been thought immiscible, a tradition supported by a solemn reading of philosophers such as Plato. A closer look at Plato – and specifically at what may be his most familiar dialogue – the Republic, suggests just the contrary. Far from immiscible, comedy and philosophy are entwined in ways that are mutually illuminating. I argue that a joke in Book V reveals the self-forgetting involved in founding the city in speech, and so illustrates the vitality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  23
    Sonja Tanner (2013). Comedy as Self-Forgetting: Implications for Sallis's Reading of Plato's Cratylus. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):188-198.
    I know of nothing that has caused me to dream more on Plato’s secrecy and his sphinx nature than the happily preserved petit fait that under the pillow of his deathbed there was found no “Bible,” nothing Egyptian, Pythagorean, or Platonic—but a volume of Aristophanes. How could even a Plato have endured life—a Greek life to which he said No—without an Aristophanes? Diogenes Laertius reports that Plato was reputed to have been so “well regulated”(kosmiois) as never once to have been (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  9
    Sonja Tanner (2008). The Talking Greeks. Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):403 - 405.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  11
    Sonja Tanner (2007). The Talking Greeks: Speech, Animals and the Other in Homer, Aeschylus, and Plato, by John Heath. Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):403-405.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  11
    Sonja Tanner (2010). In Praise of Plato's Poetic Imagination. Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- A history of the ancient "quarrel" : the philosophical "side" -- On the "side" of poetry in the ancient "quarrel" -- Imagination in the Sophist -- The pharmacological structure of the imagination -- The unity of form and content in Platonic dialogues -- Imagination and the ancient "quarrel".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Sonja Tanner (2011). In Praise of Plato's Poetic Imagination. Lexington Books.
    This book examines the role Plato accords to imagination in the ancient quarrel between poetry and philosophy. Claiming that the function of imagination evokes a realm of praxis within Plato's dialogues heretofore largely unrecognized, this book offers an interpretation of Plato that challenges the more orthodox view in which poetry and the arts are denigrated, and indeed, seen as eradicable from the dialogues altogether.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography