Search results for 'Sophists (Greek philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    V. A. Rodgers (1993). In Search of the Sophists Edward Schiappa: Protagoras and Logos: A Study in Greek Philosophy and Rhetoric. (Studies in Rhetoric/Communication.) Pp. Xvii + 239. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1991. $29.95. Jacqueline De Romilly: The Great Sophists in Periclean Athens. Translated by Janet Lloyd. Pp. Xv + 260. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992 (Originally Published in French, 1988), £35. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):77-80.
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  2.  14
    G. B. Kerferd (1972). Socrates and the Sophists W. K. C. Guthrie: A History of Greek Philosophy. Vol. Iii: The Fifth Century Enlightenment. Pp. Xvi + 544. Cambridge: University Press, 1969. Cloth, £5 Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (01):52-56.
  3.  3
    Alburey Castell (1933). Book Review:History of Greek Philosophy: B. A. G. Fuller; Vol. II: Sophists, Socrates, Plato; ; Vol. III: Aristotle. [REVIEW] Ethics 43 (4):461-.
  4. G. W. Bowersock (1969). Greek Sophists in the Roman Empire. Oxford, Clarendon P..
  5.  62
    John M. Dillon & Tania Gergel (eds.) (2003). The Greek Sophists. Penguin.
    The Sophists, who rose to prominence in democratic Athens during the mid-fifth century b.c., understood the art of rhetoric and the importance of being able to transform effective reasoning into persuasive public speaking. Their inquiries-into the gods, the origins of religion, and whether virtue can be taught-influenced the next generation of classical philosophers and formed the foundations of the European prose style and formal oratory. In this new translation each chapter is organized around the work of one character, including (...)
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  6. G. B. Kerferd (ed.) (1981). The Sophists and Their Legacy: Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium on Ancient Philosophy Held in Cooperation with Projektgruppe Altertumswissenschaften Der Thyssen Stiftung at Bad Homburg, 29th August - 1st September 1979. [REVIEW] Steiner.
     
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  7. David Roochnik (2002). An Introduction to Greek Philosophy. Teaching Co..
    lecture 1. A dialectical approach to Greek philosophy -- lecture 2. From myth to philosophy, Hesiod and Thales -- lecture 3. The Milesians and the quest for being -- lecture 4. The great intrusion, Heraclitus -- lecture 5. Parmenides, the champion of being -- lecture 6. Reconciling Heraclitus and Parmenides -- lecture 7. The Sophists, Protagoras, the first "humanist" -- lecture 8. Socrates -- lecture 9. An introduction to Plato's Dialogues -- lecture 10. Plato versus the (...), I -- lecture 11. Plato versus the Sophists, II -- lecture 12. Plato's Forms, I -- lecture 13. Plato's Forms, II -- lecture 14. Plato versus the Presocratics -- lecture 15. The Republic, the political implications of the Forms -- lecture 16. Final reflections on Plato -- lecture 17. Aristotle, "The" philosopher -- lecture 18. Aristotle's Physics, What is nature? -- lecture 19. Aristotle's Physics, The four causes -- lecture 20. Why plants have souls -- lecture 21. Aristotle's hierarchical cosmos -- lecture 22. Aristotle's teleological Politics -- lecture 23. Aristotle's teleological ethics -- lecture 24. The philosophical life. (shrink)
     
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  8. R. M. Wright (2009). Introducing Greek Philosophy. University of California Press.
    This concise, lively introduction to ancient Greek philosophy will help beginning students of both classical studies and philosophy get their bearings within an important yet complex array of names, schools, and ideas. The book illuminates the key period from the sixth to the third century BC, looking at the ideas that engaged the Greeks, in particular those of the Presocratics, the Sophists, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the earliest Hellenistic philosophers. After chronologically mapping the main figures and their (...)
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  9. Robert Mayhew (2011). Prodicus the Sophist: Texts, Translations, and Commentary. Oxford University Press.
    The past fifty years have witnessed the flourishing of scholarship in virtually every area of ancient Greek philosophy, but the sophists have for the most part been neglected. This is certainly true of Prodicus of Ceos: of the four most well-known sophists--Protagoras, Gorgias, Prodicus, and Antiphon--he has received the least attention. Robert Mayhew provides a reassessment of his life and thought, and especially his views on language, religion, and ethics. This volume consists of ninety texts with facing (...)
     
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  10.  23
    Zbigniew Nerczuk (2009). Miarą Jest Każdy Z Nas: Projekt Zwolenników Zmienności Rzeczy W Platońskim Teajtecie Na Tle Myśli Sofistycznej (Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought). Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
    Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought -/- Summary -/- One of the most intriguing motives in Plato’s Theaetetus is its historical-based division of philosophy, which revolves around the concepts of rest (represented by Parmenides and his disciples) and change (represented by Protagoras, Homer, Empedocles, and Epicharmus). This unique approach gives an opportunity to reconstruct the views of marginalized trend of early Greek philosophy - so (...)
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  11.  37
    W. K. C. Guthrie (1969/1971). The Sophists. London,Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of Professor Guthrie's great history of Greek thought, entitled The Fifth-Century Enlightenment, deals in two parts with the Sophists and Socrates, the key figures in the dramatic and fundamental shift of philosophical interest from the physical universe to man. Each of these parts is now available as a paperback with the text, bibliography and indexes amended where necessary so that each part is self-contained. The Sophists assesses the contribution of individuals like Protagoras, Gorgias and Hippias (...)
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  12. A. A. Long (ed.) (1999). The Cambridge Companion to Early Greek Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    The Western tradition of philosophy began in Greece with a cluster of thinkers often called the Presocratics, whose influence has been incalculable. They include the early Ionian cosmologists, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, the Eleatics , Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the atomists and the sophists. All these thinkers are discussed in this 1999 volume both as individuals and collectively in chapters on rational theology, epistemology, psychology, rhetoric and relativism, justice, and poetics. A chapter on causality extends the focus to include historians and medical (...)
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  13. Plato (2010). Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras. Cambridge University Press.
    Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy. The Gorgias is a long and impassioned confrontation between Socrates and a succession of increasingly heated interlocutors about political rhetoric (...)
     
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  14.  52
    Marina McCoy (2008). Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato’s treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of the practice of philosophy.
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  15.  93
    Robin Waterfield (ed.) (2000/2009). The First Philosophers: The Presocratics and Sophists. Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle said that philosophy begins with wonder, and the first Western philosophers developed theories of the world which express simultaneously their sense of wonder and their intuition that the world should be comprehensible. But their enterprise was by no means limited to this proto-scientific task. Through, for instance, Heraclitus' enigmatic sayings, the poetry of Parmenides and Empedocles, and Zeno's paradoxes, the Western world was introduced to metaphysics, rationalist theology, ethics, and logic, by thinkers who often seem to be mystics (...)
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  16.  11
    Håkan Tell (2010). Plato's Counterfeit Sophists. Distributed by Harvard University Press.
    This book explores the place of the sophists within the Greek wisdom tradition, and argues against their almost universal exclusion from serious intellectual ...
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  17.  86
    Daniel W. Graham (ed.) (2010). The Texts of Early Greek Philosophy: The Complete Fragments and Selected Testimonies of the Major Presocratics. Cambridge University Press.
    Part I : cosmologists and ontologists. The sixth century BC ; The fifth century BC -- Part II : Sophists. Protagoras ; Gorgias ; Antiphon ; Prodicus ; Anonymous texts -- Appendix. Pythagoras.
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  18.  12
    Jacqueline de Romilly (1992). The Great Sophists in Periclean Athens. Oxford University Press.
    The arrival of the Sophists in Athens in the middle of the fifth century B.C. was a major intellectual event, for they brought with them a new method of teaching founded on rhetoric and bold doctrines which broke away from tradition. In this book de Romilly investigates the reasons for the initial success of the Sophists and the reaction against them, in the context of the culture and civilization of classical Athens.
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  19. B. A. G. Fuller (1923/1968). History of Greek Philosophy. Greenwood Press.
    [v. 1] Thales to Democritus.--[v. 2] The Sophists. Socrates. Plato.--[v. 3] Aristotle.
     
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  20.  41
    H. D. Rankin (1983). Sophists, Socratics, and Cynics. Barnes & Noble Books.
  21.  1
    Kendra Eshleman (2012). The Social World of Intellectuals in the Roman Empire: Sophists, Philosophers, and Christians. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Inclusion and identity; 2. Contesting competence: the ideal of self-determination; 3. Expertise and authority in the early church; 4. Defining the circle of sophists: Philostratus and the construction of the Second Sophistic; 5. Becoming orthodox: heresiology as self-fashioning; 6. Successions and self-definition; 7. 'From such mothers and fathers': succession narratives in early Christian discourse.
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  22. Plato (2011). Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate (...)
     
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  23.  3
    Friedrich Solmsen (1975). Intellectual Experiments of the Greek Enlightenment. Princeton University Press.
  24.  13
    Mario Untersteiner (1954). The Sophists. New York, Philosophical Library.
  25.  9
    Keith Crome (2004). Lyotard and Greek Thought: Sophistry. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this original study, Keith Crome argues for the importance of Lyotard's analysis of sophistry. In the first section, the author examines the accounts of sophistry given in the works of Plato, Hegel and Heidegger. Sensitive to the important differences between them Keith Crome nevertheless establishes their fundamental identity. In the second section, the book shows the radicality of Lyotard's analysis in contrast to such traditional views. It examines Lyotard's complex and original readings of sophistical arguments, and offers a new (...)
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  26. Hermann Diels & Rosamond Kent Sprague (eds.) (1972/2001). The Older Sophists: A Complete Translation by Several Hands of the Fragments in Die Fragmente Der Vorsokratiker, Edited by Diels-Kranz. With a New Edition of Antiphon and of Euthydemus. Hackett Pub..
    Name and notion -- Protagoras -- Xeniades -- Gorgias -- Lycophron -- Prodicus -- Thrasymachus -- Hippias -- Antiphon -- Critias -- Anonymus Iamblichi -- Dissoi Logoi or Dialexeis -- Appendix: Euthydemus of Chios.
     
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  27. Plato (1996/2009). Protagoras. Oxford University Press.
    In the fifth century BC professional educators, the sophists, travelled the Greek world claiming to teach success in public and private life. In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. From criticism of the educational aims and methods of the sophists the dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life, and the role of pleasure and intellect in the context of that life.
     
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  28. Hermann Diels (1996). Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker Griechisch Und Deutsch. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Hermann Diels, professor of classics at Berlin, is chiefly remembered for this collection of quotations from, and reports about, Presocratic philosophers; his system of numbering was later adopted as the scholarly standard. This reissue reproduces the original, single-volume edition of 1903, though the book was revised and expanded three times during Diels' lifetime, and again after his death, and new fragments continue to be discovered. Designed as a reference tool to underpin university classes on the beginnings of Greek philosophy, (...)
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  29. Plato (2009). Protagoras. OUP Oxford.
    In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. The dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life and the role of intellect and pleasure.
     
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  30.  28
    G. B. Kerferd (1981). The Sophistic Movement. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers an introduction to the Sophists of fifth-century Athens and a new overall interpretation of their thought. Since Plato first animadverted on their activities, the Sophists have commonly been presented as little better than intellectual mountebanks - a picture which Professor Kerferd forcefully challenges here. Interpreting the evidence with care, he shows them to have been part of an exciting and historically crucial intellectual movement. At the centre of their teaching was a form of relativism, (...)
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  31.  44
    Plato (2009). Protagoras. OUP Oxford.
    In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. The dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life and the role of intellect and pleasure.
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  32.  13
    Nicholas Denyer (ed.) (2008). Plato: Protagoras. Cambridge University Press.
    The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another. Their arguments range widely, from political theory to literary criticism, from education to the nature of cowardice; but in view throughout this literary and philosophical masterpiece are the questions of what part knowledge plays in (...)
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  33.  24
    Tim Whitmarsh (2005). The Second Sophistic. Oxford ;Oxford University Press, Published for the Classical Association.
    The 'Second Sophistic' is arguably the fastest-growing area in contemporary classical scholarship. This short, accessible account explores the various ways in which modern scholarship has approached one of the most extraordinary literary phenomena of antiquity, the dazzling oratorical culture of the Early Imperial period. Successive chapters deal with historical and cultural background, sophistic performance, technical treatises (including the issue of Atticism and Asianism), the concept of identity, and the wider impact of sophistic performance on major authors of the time, including (...)
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  34.  31
    John Anderson Palmer (1999). Plato's Reception of Parmenides. Oxford University Press.
    John Palmer presents a new and original account of Plato's uses and understanding of his most important Presocratic predecessor, Parmenides. Adopting an innovative approach to the appraisal of intellectual influence, Palmer first explores the Eleatic underpinnings of central elements in Plato's middle-period epistemology and metaphysics and then shows how in the later dialogues Plato confronts various sophistic appropriations of Parmenides.
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  35.  15
    Thomas H. Brobjer (2001). Nietzsche's Disinterest and Ambivalence Toward the Greek Sophists. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (3):5-23.
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  36.  1
    George Duke (2012). The Sophists (Ancient Greek). In J. Feiser & B. Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 1--14.
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  37.  1
    Christoph Tobias Kasulke (2005). Fronto, Marc Aurel Und Kein Konflikt Zwischen Rhetorik Und Philosophie Im 2. Jh. N. Chr. Saur.
    Rhetoric and philosophy both constituted the main elements of literary education in the Greco-Roman world of the second century A.D. The present study deals with the relationship between both disciplines in Second Sophistic literature: Did ...
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  38. Trevor J. Saunders (1996). Michael Gagarin and Paul Woodruff, Eds., Early Greek Political Thought From Homer to the Sophists Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (2):103-105.
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  39.  34
    Nils Rauhut, Thrasymachus. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  40.  8
    Carol Poster, Protagoras. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  41.  37
    John Beversluis (2000). Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a rereading of the early dialogues of Plato from the point of view of the people with whom Socrates engages in debate. Existing studies are thoroughly dismissive of the interlocutors and reduce them to the status of mere mouthpieces for views that are hopelessly confused or demonstrably false. This book takes interlocutors seriously and treats them as genuine intellectual opponents whose views are often more defensible than commentators have generally thought.
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  42.  9
    Plato (1992/2009). Protagoras. Hackett Publishing Company Incorporated.
    Lombardo and Bell have translated this important early dialogue on virtue, wisdom, and the nature of Sophistic teaching into an idiom remarkable for its liveliness and subtlety.
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  43. Stanley Rosen (1983/1999). Plato's Sophist: The Drama of Original and Image. St. Augustine's Press.
  44. Plato (2009). Plato: Gorgias, Menexenus, and Protagoras. Cambridge University Press.
  45. B. A. F. Hubbard (1982/1984). Plato's Protagoras: A Socratic Commentary. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  46. Mauro Bonazzi (2010). I Sofisti. Carocci.
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  47. Levi Condinho, Maria José Vaz Pinto & Ana Alexandra Alves de Sousa (eds.) (2005). Sofistas: Testemunhos E Fragmentos. Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda.
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  48. Luciana Fernandes Bruno (2007). Aspectos Psico-Antropológicos da Filosofia Do Direito Dos Sofistas. Abc Editora.
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  49. Gorgias (2010). Su Ciò Che Non È. Olms.
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  50. Dēmētrēs A. Karampelas (2004). Dikaio Kai Thesmoi Stēn Deutera Sophistikē. Ekdoseis Ant. N. Sakkoula.
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