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  1. Sor-Hoon Tan (forthcoming). Review: Erin M. Cline, Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] .
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  2. Sor-Hoon Tan (2014). Cline , Erin M. Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice . New York: Fordham University Press, 2013. Pp. 354. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):388-392.
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  3. Sor-Hoon Tan (2014). The Concept of Yi (义) in the Mencius and Problems of Distributive Justice. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):489-505.
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  4. Sor-Hoon Tan (2013). Democracy and the Intersection of Religion and Traditions. Education and Culture 29 (2):187-190.
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  5. Sor-Hoon Tan (2013). Olberding, Amy, Moral Exemplars in the Analects: The Good Person Is That. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):261-265.
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  6. Sor-Hoon Tan (2013). Ancient Chinese Thought, Modern Chinese Power (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (1):105-108.
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  7. Sor-Hoon Tan (2012). Democracy in Confucianism. Philosophy Compass 7 (5):293-303.
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  8. Sor-Hoon Tan (2012). Introduction. Comparative Philosophy 4.
    This is the introduction to the content of the jounrnal's special issue (vol. 4 no. 1 / January 2013) celebrating the tenth anniversary of the International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP), which includes five peer-reviewed articles by ISCWP members.
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  9. Sor-Hoon Tan (2012). Li (Ritual/Rite) and Tian (Heaven/Nature) in the Xunzi: Does Confucian Li Need Metaphysics? [REVIEW] Sophia 51 (2):155-175.
    Ritual (li) is central to Confucian ethics and political philosophy. Robert Neville believes that Chinese Philosophy has an important role to play in our times by bringing ritual theory to the analysis of global moral and political issues. In a recent work, Neville maintains that ritual ‘needs a contemporary metaphysical expression if its importance is to be seen.’ This paper examines Neville's claim through a detailed study of the ‘ethics of ritual’ in one of the early Confucian texts, the Xunzi. (...)
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  10. Sor-Hoon Tan (2012). Ritual and Deference: Extending Chinese Philosophy in a Comparative Context. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):131-134.
    The twelve elegant essays in this slim volume by Robert Cummings Neville, Ritual and Deference: Extending Chinese Philosophy in a Comparative Context, originating in lectures and projects of varying purposes, crystallize Neville’s “Confucian program” of comparative philosophy, which has been taking shape in his earlier works. More accessible than his other monographs, its apparent simplicity is deceptive. While it would inspire and benefit even the novice, only those who have traveled some distance on the same arduous journey would fully appreciate (...)
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  11. Sor-Hoon Tan (2012). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Democracy in Confucianism. Philosophy Compass 7 (9):665-668.
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  12. Sor-Hoon Tan (2011). Beyond Liberal Democracy: Political Thinking for an East Asian Context – By Daniel A. Bell. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):157-161.
  13. Sor-Hoon Tan (2011). How Can a Chinese Democracy Be Pragmatic? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2):196-225.
    Whether the Pragmatic conception of democracy is applicable outside the United States of America is a question that had already been raised even during Dewey’s life time. His visit to China, in particular, has been seen as proof that “the Pragmatic method” for bringing about democracy is inherently flawed.3 However, even if it was a failed experiment, China’s past encounter with Dewey’s Pragmatism should not be seen as absolute proof that Chinese democracy can never be Pragmatic. When an experiment fails, (...)
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  14. Sor-Hoon Tan (2011). Polishing the Chinese Mirror: Essays in Honor of Henry Rosemont, Jr. (Review). Philosophy East and West 61 (1):236-240.
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  15. Sor-Hoon Tan (2011). The Dao of Politics: Li (Rituals/Rites) and Laws as Pragmatic Tools of Government. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):468-491.
    American philosopher John Dewey spent more than two years in China (1919–1921). During and after his visit, he wrote some fairly perceptive and insightful commentaries on China. These were published in periodicals such as the New Republic, Asia, and the China Review, and sometimes in newspapers such as the Baltimore Sun. However, there is hardly any discussion of Chinese philosophy in Dewey’s published works or even his papers and correspondence. Among his rare mentions of Chinese philosophy was an article published (...)
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  16. Aaron Wilson, Eino Kaila, Heikki A. Kovailanen, Sami Pihlström, Zach VanderVeen, Charles A. Hobbs, Sor-Hoon Tan, Jeff Kasser, Michael Brodrick & Sami Paavola (2011). 1. Peirce Versus Davidson on Metaphorical Meaning Peirce Versus Davidson on Metaphorical Meaning (Pp. 117-135). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2).
     
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  17. Sor-hoon Tan (2010). Authoritative Master Kong (Confucius) in an Authoritarian Age. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):137-149.
    Employing the distinction between the authoritarian (based on coercion) and the authoritative (based on excellence), this study of the understanding of authority in the Analects argues against interpretations of Confucianism which cast Confucius himself as advocating authoritarianism. Passages with key notions such as shang 上 and xia 下; fu 服 and cong 從; quan 權 and wei 威, are analyzed to illuminate ideas of hierarchy, obedience, and the nature of authority itself in the text. The evidence pieced together reveals the (...)
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  18. Sor-Hoon Tan (2010). Our Country Right or Wrong: A Pragmatic Response to Anti-Democratic Cultural Nationalism in China. Contemporary Pragmatism 7 (2):45-69.
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  19. Fred Dallmayr, Chenyang Li, Sor-Hoon Tan & Daniel A. Bell (2009). Beyond Liberal Democracy: A Debate on Democracy and Confucian Meritocracy. Philosophy East and West 59 (4):523-523.
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  20. Sor-Hoon Tan (2009). Beyond Elitism: A Community Ideal for a Modern East Asia. Philosophy East and West 59 (4):537-553.
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  21. Sor-Hoon Tan (2009). Confucian Political Ethics – by Daniel A. Bell. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):177-180.
  22. Sor-hoon Tan (2009). Huang, Junjie, and J Iang Yihua, Eds., New Explorations of Public and Private Spheres: Comparison of East Asian and Western View Points 公私領域新探:東亞與西方觀點之比較. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):221-224.
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  23. Sor-hoon Tan (2008). A Cloud Across the Pacific: Essays on the Clash Between Chinese and Western Political Theories Today (Review). Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 420-424.
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  24. Sor-Hoon Tan (2008). Contemporary Neo-Confucian Philosophy. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  25. Sor-Hoon Tan & John Whalen-Bridge (eds.) (2008). Democracy as Culture: Deweyan Pragmatism in a Globalizing World. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the significance of Dewey’s thought on democracy for the contemporary world.
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  26. Sor-Hoon Tan (2007). Relativism and Beyond (Review). Philosophy East and West 57 (4):603-607.
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  27. Sor-Hoon Tan (2007). Confucian Democracy as Pragmatic Experiment: Uniting Love of Learning and Love of Antiquity. Asian Philosophy 17 (2):141 – 166.
    This paper argues for the pragmatic construction of Confucian democracy by showing that Chinese philosophers who wish to see Confucianism flourish again as a positive dimension of Chinese civilization need to approach it pragmatically and democratically, otherwise their love of the past is at the expense of something else Confucius held in equal esteem, love of learning. Chinese philosophers who desire democracy for China would do well to learn from the earlier failures of the iconoclastic Westernizers, and realize that a (...)
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  28. Sor-hoon Tan (2007). Karyn Lai, Learning From Chinese Philosophies: Ethics of Independent and Contextualised Self , Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2006, 218 Pp., ISBN: 0754633829, Hb. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (1):99-102.
    Learning from Chinese Philosophies explores early Confucianism and Daoism in order to engage today’s problems. By bringing into thoughtful play Confucian ideas of self and society and Daoist understanding of situated self, the author uses the debate between the two philosophies to argue for her understanding of Confucian moral thinking and Daoist metaethics. According to Lai, Daoist metaethics question dichotomous frameworks and discuss the unity of opposites enabling dynamic interplay of nonantagonistic polarities. Lai not only rejects comparisons of Confucianism to (...)
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  29. Zain Ali, Max Charlesworth, Hans-Georg Moeller, Christopher W. Gowans, Shalom Goldman, Dmitry A. Olshansky, Sor-hoon Tan & Patrick Hutchings (2005). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Sophia 44 (2):71-87.
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  30. Sor-Hoon Tan (2005). Imagining Confucius: Paradigmatic Characters and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):409-426.
  31. Sor-Hoon Tan (2005). Of Diversities and Comparisons .. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 55 (1):111 - 124.
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  32. Sor-Hoon Tan (2005). Cultural Crossings Against Ethnocentric Currents. International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):433-445.
    Despite contemporary Confucianism’s aspirations to be a world philosophy, there is an ethnocentric strand within the Confucian tradition, most glaringly exemplified in Han Yu’s attacks on Buddhism. This paper re-assesses Confucian ethnocentrism in the context of contrary practices that indicate a more pragmatic attitude among Confucians toward cross-cultural interactions. It argues that while the ethnocentric tendency serves as constant reminder of the need for vigilance, and recognition of the difficulties of crossing cultural boundaries, there are nevertheless resources within Confucianism for (...)
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  33. Sor-Hoon Tan (2005). Review: Of Diversities and Comparisons .. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 55 (1):111 - 124.
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  34. E. Christian Brugger, Stella Chen, Carrie E. Reed, Cao Yuqing, Kim-Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (2004). Raymond Aron, The Dawn of Universal History. New York: Basic Books, 2003, 518 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-465-00408-3, $22.00 (Pb). Linda A. Bell, Beyond the Margins: Reflections of a Feminist Philosopher. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003, 245 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-7914-5904-7, $17.95 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38:433-435.
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  35. Sor-Hoon Tan (2004). China's Pragmatist Experiment in Democracy: Hu Shih's Pragmatism and Dewey's Influence in China. Metaphilosophy 35 (1‐2):44-64.
  36. Sor-hoon Tan (2004). From Cannibalism to Empowerment: An. Philosophy East and West 54 (1).
    : Developed here is a Confucian balance between two key democratic ideals, liberty and community, by focusing on the Confucian notion of li (ritual), which has often been considered hostile to liberty. By adopting a semiotic approach to li and relating it to recent studies of ritual in various Western disciplines, li's contribution to communication and its aesthetic dimension are explored to show how emphasizing harmony without sacrificing reflective experience and personal fulfillment renders li a concept of moral empowerment of (...)
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  37. Sor-hoon Tan (2004). From Cannibalism to Empowerment: An Analects-Inspired Attempt to Balance Community and Liberty. Philosophy East and West 54 (1):52-70.
    Developed here is a Confucian balance between two key democratic ideals, liberty and community, by focusing on the Confucian notion of li (ritual), which has often been considered hostile to liberty. By adopting a semiotic approach to li and relating it to recent studies of ritual in various Western disciplines, li's contribution to communication and its aesthetic dimension are explored to show how emphasizing harmony without sacrificing reflective experience and personal fulfillment renders li a concept of moral empowerment of free (...)
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  38. Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.) (2003). The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
    This question is the theme uniting all these essays by lead Chinese and Western philosophers.
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  39. Antonio Rappa & Sor-Hoon Tan (2003). Political Implications of Confucian Familism. Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):87 – 102.
    The family could be mobilized as a political resource for economic 'development'. What kind of family would be compatible with a knowledge-based economy? We argue that authoritarian Confucian familism is incompatible with the knowledge-based economy; but it is possible to construct a different model of the ideal Confucian family which will be compatible with such an economy: a family ideal that emphasizes internal strengths of relationships rather than building barriers to keep out 'undesirable influences', that advocates a respect for authority (...)
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  40. Sor-Hoon Tan (2003). Can There Be a Confucian Civil Society? In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
  41. Sor-Hoon Tan (2001). Mentor or Friend? International Studies in Philosophy 33 (4):99-121.
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  42. Sor-Hoon Tan (1999). Experience as Art. Asian Philosophy 9 (2):107 – 122.
    Chinese philosophy views experience as intrinsically aesthetic. This world view could be elucidated through a consideration of John Dewey's aesthetics and features of Chinese art. Dewey's philosophy of art starts with an understanding of experience as 'live processes' of living creatures interacting with their environment. Such processes are autopoietic in being self-sustaining, ever-changing, capable of increasing complexity, capable of generating novelty, direction and progress on its own. Its autopoietic character is a precondition of the aesthetic in the process of experience. (...)
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