Search results for 'Soul Jainism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sumati Chand Jain (1978). Structure and Functions of Soul in Jainism. Bharatiya Jnanpith.score: 132.0
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  2. Jayanti Lal Jain (2010). Pure Soul and its Infinite Treasure. Research Foundation for Jainology.score: 78.0
     
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  3. M. Rajagopala Rao (2001). Conception of Jiva (Soul) in Jainism: Consideration in Historical Perspective. In Haripriya Rangarajan, G. Kamalakar, A. K. V. S. Reddy, M. Veerender & K. Venkatachalam (eds.), Jainism: Art, Architecture, Literature & Philosophy. Sharada Pub. House. 231.score: 78.0
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  4. Dr Sa Bhuvanendra Kumar (2002). Soul and Its Functional Mechanism in Jainism Elucidation by Acarya Kundakunda (C. 41 BCE). In Hīrālāla Jaina, Dharmacandra Jaina & R. K. Sharma (eds.), Jaina Philosophy, Art & Science in Indian Culture. Sharada Pub. House. 255.score: 72.0
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  5. Vīrasāgara Jaina (2009). Bhāratīya Darśana Meṃ Ātmā Evaṃ Paramātmā: [Jaina Darśana Ke Viśesha Pariprekshya Meṃ]. Bhāratīya Jñānapīṭha.score: 60.0
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  6. Sī. Vī Rāvala (2006). Bhāratīya Darśanamāṃ Ātmatattva Tathā Paramātmatattvanī Vibhāvanā: Jainadarśananā Viśishṭa Sandarbhamāṃ. Bho. Je. Adhyayana Saṃśodhana Vidyābhavana.score: 60.0
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  7. Ray Billington (1997). Understanding Eastern Philosophy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Ray Billington explores the spirituality of Eastern thought and its differences from and relationships with the Western religious tradition by presenting the main principles of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Jainism and Confucianism. Billington discusses the central themes of religious philosophy, comparing Eastern and Western views of belief of God, the soul, moral decision-making, nature, faith and authority. He then challenges theism, particularly Christianity, with its belief in a personal God bestowing a certain version of "truth". He concludes that the (...)
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  8. John E. Cort (2011). Jains in the World: Religious Values and Ideology in India. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    "There is no doubt that the wealth of new data and ideas offered in this exquisite book provides the deepest insights yet into the contemporary religious world of Jain laity. It will serve for some time as a paradigmatic monograph for future empirical studies of Jain religious life." --Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies -/- "Jains in the World is a significant and welcome ethnography of contemporary Jains in western India by the most prominent scholar of (...) in North America. This book is a must for scholars of South Asian religions and will provide scholars of Hindu traditions fine grounding both in a central dialectic of Jain thought and in contemporary Jain praxis." --International Journal of Hindu Studies -/- "A valuable addition to the literature on Jainism as a living faith. Since it has the additional merits of being clearly written, attractively illustrated, and free of unnecessary theoretical baggage, it should serve as a good introduction to this tradition for college students." --Journal of the American Oriental Society -/- "A must-read for understanding, by and large, the ritual world of the Jains. He has succeeded in proving that the concept of well-being is as central to the Jains' moral universe as their more entrenched pursuit of the goal of liberation of soul from karmic bondage."--History of Religions -/- "An essential read for students and scholars of Jainism. . . . it identifies and defines a realm of value in Jainism strongly alluded to by recent scholarship, but which, until now, had not been explicitly stated. For this reason Jains in the World will doubtless prove to be a fundamental turning point in the development of Jaina studies."-- The Journal of Religion -/- This book presents a detailed fieldwork-based study of the ancient Indian religion of Jainism. Drawing on field research in northern Gujarat and on the study of both ancient Sanskrit and Prakrit and modern vernacular Jain religious literature, John Cort provides a rounded portrait of the religion as it is practiced today. (shrink)
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  9. Grant Hardy (2011). Great Minds of the Eastern Intellectual Tradition. Great Courses.score: 24.0
    Disc 1. Life's great questions: Asian perspectives ; The Vedas and Upanishads: the beginning -- Disc 2. Mahavira and Jainism: extreme nonviolence ; The Buddha: the middle way -- Disc 3. The Bhagavad Gita: the way of action ; Confucius: in praise of sage-kings -- Disc 4. Laozi and Daoism: the way of nature ; The Hundred Schools of preimperial China -- Disc 5. Mencius and Xunzi: Confucius's successors ; Sunzi and Han Feizi: strategy and legalism -- Disc 6. (...)
     
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  10. Nicholas D. Smith (1999). Plato's Analogy of Soul and State. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):31-49.score: 18.0
    In Part I of this paper, I argue that the arguments Plato offers for the tripartition of the soul are founded upon an equivocation, and that each of the valid options by which Plato might remove the equivocation will not produce a tripartite soul. In Part II, I argue that Plato is not wholly committed to an analogy of soul and state that would require either a tripartite state or a tripartite soul for the analogy to (...)
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  11. Richard Swinburne (1986). The Evolution of the Soul. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This is a revised and updated version of Swinburne's controversial treatment of the eternal philosophical problem of the relation between mind and body. He argues that we can only make sense of the interaction between the mental and the physical in terms of the soul, and that there is no scientific explanation of the evolution of the soul.
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  12. Vlad Alexandrescu (2013). Regius and Gassendi on the Human Soul. Intellectual History Review 23 (2):433-452.score: 18.0
    Reshaping the neo-Aristotelian doctrines about the human soul was Descartes’s most spectacular enterprise, which gave birth to some of the sharpest debates in the Republic of Letters. Neverthe- less, it was certainly Descartes’s intention, as already expressed in the Discours de la méthode, to show that his new metaphysics could be supplemented with experimental research in the field of medicine and the conservation of life. It is no surprise then that several natural philosophers and doctors, such as Henricus Regius (...)
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  13. Brian Prince (2012). The Form of Soul in the Phaedo. Plato 11 11.score: 18.0
    Although the Phaedo never mentions a Form of Soul explicitly, the dialogue implies this Form’s existence. First, a number of passages in which Socrates describes his views about Forms imply that there are very many Forms; thus, Socrates’ general description of his theory gives no ground for denying that there is a Form of Soul. Second, the final argument for immortality positively requires a Form of Soul.
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  14. A. P. Bos (2003). The Soul and Its Instrumental Body: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Philosophy of Living Nature. Brill.score: 18.0
    Aristotle's definition of the soul should be interpreted as: 'the soul is the entelechy of a natural body that serves as its instrument'.
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  15. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2007). Socrates on How Wrongdoing Damages the Soul. Journal of Ethics 11 (4):337 - 356.score: 18.0
    There has been little scholarly attention given to explaining exactly how and why Socrates thinks that wrongdoing damages the soul. But there is more than a simple gap in the literature here, we shall argue. The most widely accepted view of Socratic moral psychology, we claim, actually leaves this well-known feature of Socrates’ philosophy absolutely inexplicable. In the first section of this paper, we rehearse this view of Socratic moral psychology, and explain its inadequacy on the issue of the (...)
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  16. Stewart Goetz (2011). A Brief History of the Soul. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 18.0
    The soul in Greek thought -- The soul in medieval Christian thought -- The soul in continental thought -- Locke, Butler, reid, and Hume -- Soul-body causal interaction -- The soul and contemporary science -- Contemporary challenges to the soul -- Thoughts on the future of the soul.
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  17. Palmyre M. F. Oomen (2003). On Brain, Soul, Self, and Freedom: An Essay in Bridging Neuroscience and Faith. Zygon 38 (2):377-392.score: 18.0
    The article begins at the intellectual fissure between many statements coming from neuroscience and the language of faith and theology. First I show that some conclusions drawn from neuroscientific research are not as firm as they seem: neuroscientific data leave room for the interpretation that mind matters. I then take a philosophical-theological look at the notions of soul, self, and freedom, also in the light of modern scientific research (self-organization, neuronal networks), and present a view in which these theologically (...)
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  18. Olaf L. Müller, Consciousness Without Physical Basis. A Metaphysical Meditation on the Immortality of the Soul.score: 18.0
    Can we conceive of a mind without body? Does, for example, the idea of the soul's immortality make sense? Certain versions of materialism deny such questions; I shall try to prove that these versions of materialism cannot be right. They fail because they cannot account for the mental vocabulary from the language of brains in the vat. Envatted expressions such as "I think", "I believe", etc., do not have to be reinterpreted when we translate them to our language; they (...)
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  19. Owen J. Flanagan (2003). The Problem of the Soul: Two Visions of Mind and How to Reconcile Them. Basic Books.score: 18.0
    Traditional ideas about the basic nature of humanity are under attack as never before. The very attributes that make us human--free will, the permanence of personal identity, the existence of the soul--are being undermined and threatened by the current revolution in the science of the mind. If the mind is the brain, and therefore a physical object subject to deterministic laws, how can we have free will? If most of our thoughts and impulses are unconscious, how can we be (...)
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  20. Italo Testa (2012). Hegel's Naturalism, or Soul and Body in the Encyclopedia. In David Stern (ed.), Essays on Hegel’s Philosophy of Subjective Spirit, SUNY Press Albany, New York (pp. 19-35). SUNY Press.score: 18.0
    Paper given at the 20th Biennial Meeting of the Hegel Society of America, University of South Carolina, October 24-26, 2008 -/- The local problem of the soul-body relation can be grasped only against the global background of the relation between Nature and Spirit. This relates to Hegel's naturalism: the idea that there is one single reality - living reality - and different levels of description of it. This implies, moreover, that it is possible to ascribe some form of naturality (...)
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  21. Kundakunda (2012). Āchārya Kundkund's Samayasāra: With Hindi and English Translation = Śrimadācārya Kundakund Viracita Samayasāra. Vikalp Printers.score: 18.0
    As Acharya Vidyanand writes in the Foreword of Samayasara, it is the ultimate conscious reality. The enlightened soul has infinite glory. It has the innate ability to demolish the power of karmas, both auspicious as well as inauspicious, which constitute the cycle of births and deaths, and are an obstacle in the path of liberation of the soul. -/- Samayasara is an essential reading for anyone who wishes to lead a purposeful and contented life. It provides irrefutable and (...)
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  22. Jose Filipe Silva & Juhana Toivanen (2011). The Active Nature of the Soul in Sense Perception: Robert Kilwardby and Peter Olivi. Vivarium 48 (3-4):245-278.score: 18.0
    This article discusses the theories of perception of Robert Kilwardby and Peter of John Olivi. Our aim is to show how in challenging certain assumptions of medieval Aristotelian theories of perception they drew on Augustine and argued for the active nature of the soul in sense perception. For both Kilwardby and Olivi, the soul is not passive with respect to perceived objects; rather, it causes its own cognitive acts with respect to external objects and thus allows the subject (...)
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  23. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Review of Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick, The Soul of Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies.score: 18.0
    This is a contribution to a symposium on Clark and Dudrick’s The Soul of Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil. I focus on three aspects of their book. First, I critique Clark and Dudrick’s claim that Nietzsche recognizes a discrete “will to value.” Second, I argue that Clark and Dudrick’s reading of Nietzschean drives (Triebe) as homunculi is indefensible. Third, I raise questions about their claim that Nietzsche understands the self as a “normative ordering” of drives, which they distinguish from (...)
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  24. Stephan Blatti (2008). Review: Raymond Martin and John Barresi: The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):191-195.score: 18.0
    This is a review of Raymond Martin and John Barresi's The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity (Columbia University Press, 2006).
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  25. Shai Frogel (2010). The Soul: An Existentialist Point of View. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (2):191-204.score: 18.0
    The debate in relation to the soul suffers nowadays from a great lack of clarity. At least part of this cloudiness stems from a confusion among three different viewpoints that are not always reconcilable or mutually intelligible: the scientific point of view (natural sciences and empirical psychology), the therapeutic point of view (especially psychoanalysis) and the philosophical point of view. The goal of this paper is to blow away a little this cloudiness, and to introduce into the discussion a (...)
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  26. M. James C. Crabbe (ed.) (1999). From Soul to Self. Routledge.score: 18.0
    From Soul to Self takes us on a fascinating journey through philosophy, theology, religious studies and physiological sciences. The contributors explore the relationship between a variety of ideas that have arisen in philosophy, religion and science, each idea seeking to explain why we think we are somehow unique and distinct.
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  27. Michael Davis (2011). The Soul of the Greeks: An Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    The soul of Achilles -- Aristotle -- The doubleness of soul -- Out of itself for the sake of itself -- Nutritive soul -- Sensing soul: vision -- Thinking soul. Sensation and imagination ; Passive and active mind ; Imagination and thought -- The soul as self and self-aware -- "The father of the Logos" -- "For the friend is another self" -- Herodotus: the rest and motion of soul -- Rest in motion: (...)
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  28. D. Zimmerman (1991). Two Cartesian Arguments for the Simplicity of the Soul. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (July):127-37.score: 18.0
    The most well-known arguments for the simplicity of the soul - i.e., for the thesis that the subject of psychological states must be an unextended substance -are based upon the logical possibility of disembodiment. Descartes introduced this sort of argument into modern philosophy, and a version of it has been defended recently by Richard Swinburne. Some of the underlying assumptions of both arguments are examined and defended, but a closer look reveals that each depends upon unjustified inferences from the (...)
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  29. Dag Nikolaus Hasse (2008). The Early Albertus Magnus and His Arabic Sources on the Theory of the Soul. Vivarium 46 (3):232-252.score: 18.0
    Albertus Magnus favours the Aristotelian definition of the soul as the first actuality or perfection of a natural body having life potentially. But he interprets Aristotle's vocabulary in a way that it becomes compatible with the separability of the soul from the body. The term “perfectio” is understood as referring to the soul's activity only, not to its essence. The term “forma” is avoided as inadequate for defining the soul's essence. The soul is understood as (...)
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  30. Richard C. Dales (1995). The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century. E.J. Brill.score: 18.0
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  31. Tad M. Schmaltz (1996). Malebranche's Theory of the Soul: A Cartesian Interpretation. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book offers a provocative interpretation of the theory of the soul in the writings of the French Cartesian, Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715). Though recent work on Malebranche's philosophy of mind has tended to emphasize his account of ideas, Schmaltz focuses rather on his rejection of Descartes' doctrine that the mind is better known than the body. In particular, he considers and defends Malebranche's argument that this rejection has a Cartesian basis. Schmaltz reveals that this argument not only provides a (...)
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  32. John J. McGraw (2004). Brain & Belief: An Exploration of the Human Soul. Aegis Press.score: 18.0
    In this intriguing book, the concept of the soul is thoroughly investigated.
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  33. Kevin Corrigan (2011). Simmias Objection to Socrates in the Phaedo: Harmony, Symphony and Some Later Platonic/ Patristic Responses to the Mind/Soul-Body Question. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (2):147-162.score: 18.0
    Simmias' famous epiphenomenalist analogy of the soul-body relation to the harmony and strings of a lyre (together with Cebes' subsequent objection) leads to Socrates' initial refutation and subsequent prolonged defense of soul's immortality in the Phaedo . It also yields in late antiquity significant treatments of the harmony relation by Plotinus ( Ennead III 6 [26] 4, 30-52) and Porphyry ( Sentences 18, 8-18) that present a larger context for viewing the nature of harmony in the soul (...)
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  34. Lodi Nauta (2008). From an Outsider's Point of View: Lorenzo Valla on the Soul. Vivarium 46 (3):368-391.score: 18.0
    In his Repastinatio . . . Lorenzo Valla launched a heavy attack on Aristotelian-scholastic thought. While most of this book is devoted to metaphysics, language and argumentation, Valla also incorporates chapters on the soul and natural philosophy. Using as criteria good Latin, common sense and common observation, he rejected much of standard Aristotelian teaching on the soul, replacing the hylopmorphic account of the scholastics by an Augustinian one. In this article his arguments on the soul's autonomy, nobility (...)
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  35. Marleen Rozemond (1997). Leibniz on the Union of Body and Soul. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (2):150-178.score: 18.0
    Leibniz took pride in the Pre-established Harmony as an account of mind-body union. On the other hand, he sometimes claimed that he did not have a good account of such a union. I explain the tension by distinguishing between two importantly different issues that concern the union: body-soul interaction and the per se unity of the composite. Furthermore, I argue that, contrary to R.M. Adams, Leibniz did have the philosophical resources to account for a per se unity of the (...)
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  36. Ricardo Salles (ed.) (2005). Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Leading figures in ancient philosophy present nineteen original papers on three key themes in the work of Richard Sorabji. The papers dealing with Metaphysics range from Democritus to Numenius on basic questions about the structure and nature of reality: necessitation, properties, and time. The section on Soul includes one paper on the individuation of souls in Plato and five papers on Aristotle's and Aristotelian theories of cognition, with a special emphasis on perception. The section devoted to Ethics concentrates upon (...)
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  37. Markus Wild (2008). Marin Cureau de la Chambre on the Natural Cognition of the Vegetative Soul: An Early Modern Theory of Instinct. Vivarium 46 (3):443-461.score: 18.0
    According to Marin Cureau de La Chambre—steering a middleway between the Aristotelian and the Cartesian conception of the soul—everything that lives cognizes and everything that cognizes is alive. Cureau sticks with the general tripart distinction of vegetative, sensitive, and intellectual soul. Each part of the soul has its own cognition. Cognition is the way in which living beings regulate bodily equilibirum and environmental navigation. This regulative activity is gouverned by acquired or by innate images. Natural cognition (or (...)
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  38. Dennis des Chene (2000). Life's Form: Late Aristotelian Conceptions of the Soul. Cornell University Press.score: 18.0
    Finally, he looks at,the various kinds of unity of the body, both in itself and in its union with the soul.Spirits and Clocks continues Des Chene's highly ...
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  39. Joshua Wilburn (2013). Moral Education and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Laws. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:63.score: 18.0
    In this paper I argue that although the Republic’s tripartite theory of the soul is not explicitly endorsed in Plato’s late work the Laws, it continues to inform the Laws from beneath the surface of the text. In particular, I argue that the spirited part of the soul continues to play a major role in moral education and development in the Laws (as it did in earlier texts, where it is characterized as reason’s psychic ‘ally’). I examine the (...)
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  40. Adam Wood (2012). Incorporeal Nous and the Science of the Soul in Aristotle's De Anima. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):169-182.score: 18.0
    In this essay I argue first that De anima 3.4–5 shows Aristotle answering affirmatively a question that he raises near the beginning of the work, namely, whether any of the soul’s affections are proper to it alone. Second, I argue that this initial conclusion reveals something important about the very first question that Aristotle broaches in the work, viz., the method and starting-points employed in the science of the soul. Aristotle’s position, I claim, shows that investigating the human (...)
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  41. Michele D.’Ambra (2008). Spirit and Soul in Hedwig Conrad-Martius's Metaphysical Dialogues : From Nature to the Human Being. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (4):491-502.score: 18.0
    Through the analysis of Conrad-Martius Metaphysical Dialogues, our aim is show the relevance of the concept of spirit (Geist) and soul (Seele) to clarify the constitution of the human being. In order to understand Conrad-Martius’ phenomenological description, it is necessary to explain Husserl’s and Stein’s approaches to the same argument. Briefly their position is described at the beginning of the essay and then the main points of Conrad-Martius’ book are pinpointed. Human being is understandable in the complex of the (...)
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  42. Douglas M. Stokes (2014). Reimagining the Soul: Afterlife in the Age of Matter. McFarland.score: 18.0
    This book explores conceptions of the soul and the afterlife that are consistent with the findings of modern science. It approaches these subjects from many different angles: religious, philosophical, scientific, poetic, humorous, quasi-scientific, and even pseudoscientific (just to be fair). Many possible afterlives are examined, including physical resurrection (whether supernatural, biological, or cybernetic in form), reincarnation, participation in a dream-like world or collective mind, and the persistence of recycling centers of pure consciousness. -/- Philosophical, scientific, and religious doctrines regarding (...)
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  43. Dominik Perler (ed.) (2009). Transformations of the Soul: Aristotelian Psychology, 1250-1650. Brill.score: 18.0
    Focusing on the period between Albertus Magnus and Descartes, the ten contributions examine various Aristotelian theories of the soul.
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  44. Richard Swinburne (2003). Body and Soul. Think 5 (5):31 - 35.score: 18.0
    Hard materialism claims that the only events are physical events, involving the instantiation of physical properties in physical substances. This however omits all the mental events to which we have privileged access. Soft materialism claims that the only events are physical events and mental events involving the instantiation of mental properties in physical substances. But a list of such events would not tell us which persons had which bodies. Only dualism, which holds that the essential part of each person is (...)
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  45. Jose Filipe Silva (2012). Robert Kilwardby on the Human Soul: Plurality of Forms and Censorship in the Thirteenth Century. Brill.score: 18.0
    Robert Kilwardby on the Human Soul examines Kilwardby’s role in conciliating Aristotelian and Augustinian views on the soul, soul-body relation, and cognition.
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  46. Ricardo Da Costa (2009). Transcendence above immanence: the Soul in mysticism of Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 26:97-105.score: 18.0
    This work will examine the concept of soul developed in mysticism of abbot Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). For this, I will analyze extracts of five writings namely the Third Series of Sentences, three of his Liturgical Sermons, and the parabola The Three Children of the King.
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  47. Renato Alves de Oliveira (2013). A relação entre o corpo e a alma do ser humano na teologia cristã: uma aproximação histórica e contemporânea. (The relation between body and soul of human being in Christian Theology: A historical and contemporary approach). Horizonte 11 (31):1081-1105.score: 18.0
    A relação entre o corpo e a alma do ser humano na teologia cristã: uma aproximação histórica e contemporânea. (The relation between body and soul of human being in Christian Theology: A historical and contemporary approach) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n31p1081 O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar como se deu, no plano histórico, e se dá, atualmente, na contemporaneidade, as relações entre o corpo e a alma, no âmbito da antropologia cristã. Historicamente, primeiro se constatou a existência do corpo e da (...)
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  48. der Eijk & J. Ph (2005). Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This work brings together Philip van der Eijk's previously-published essays on the close connections that existed between medicine and philosophy throughout antiquity. Medical authors such as the Hippocratic writers, Diocles, Galen, Soranus and Caelius Aurelianus elaborated on philosophical methods such as causal explanation, definition and division and applied key concepts such as the notion of nature to their understanding of the human body. Similarly, philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle were highly valued for their contributions to medicine. This interaction was (...)
     
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  49. Lukács György, John T. Sanders & Katie Terezakis (eds.) (2010). Soul and Form. Columbia University Press.score: 18.0
    György Lukács first published the original Hungarian language version of Soul and Form in 1910. It included eight of the ten essays later to be published in subsequent German, Italian, and English editions. This current centennial edition adds to the mix one additional Lukács essay, "On Poverty of Spirit", written at roughly the same time as the others and bearing a vital relationship to them. Finally, in this edition we have added to the Lukács material an important introductory essay (...)
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  50. Rosalie Osmond (2003). Imagining the Soul: A History. Sutton Pub. Ltd..score: 18.0
    Is there a ghost in the machine? Are we born trailing clouds of glory? Is there a part of us that will survive death? Is the soul reborn in different bodily forms? These and similar questions have occupied humankind since the dawn of consciousness. Rosalie Osmond's book explores the way the soul has been represented in different cultures and at different times, from ancient Egypt and Greece, through medieval Europe and into the 21st century. Basing her approach on (...)
     
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