Search results for 'Sound' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Sound in Philosophy of Mind
  1.  75
    Pendaran Roberts (forthcoming). Turning Up the Volume on the Property View of Sound. Inquiry:1-25.
    In the present article, I show that sounds are properties that are not physical in a narrow sense. First, I argue that sounds are properties using Moorean style arguments and defend this property view from various arguments against it that make use of salient disanalogies between sounds and colors. The first disanalogy is that we talk of objects making sounds but not of objects making colors. The second is that we count and quantify over sounds but not colors. The third (...)
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  2. Robert Pasnau (1999). What is Sound? Philosophical Quarterly 50 (196):309-24.
    Our standard view about sound is incoherent. On the one hand, we suppose that sound is a quality, not of the object that makes the sound, but of the surrounding medium. This is the supposition of our ordinary language, modern science and a long philosophical tradition. On the other hand, we suppose that sound is the object of hearing. This too is the assumption of ordinary language, modern science and a long philosophical tradition. Yet these two (...)
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  3.  31
    Katerina Kantartzis, Mutsumi Imai & Sotaro Kita (2011). Japanese Sound-Symbolism Facilitates Word Learning in English-Speaking Children. Cognitive Science 35 (3):575-586.
    Sound-symbolism is the nonarbitrary link between the sound and meaning of a word. Japanese-speaking children performed better in a verb generalization task when they were taught novel sound-symbolic verbs, created based on existing Japanese sound-symbolic words, than novel nonsound-symbolic verbs (Imai, Kita, Nagumo, & Okada, 2008). A question remained as to whether the Japanese children had picked up regularities in the Japanese sound-symbolic lexicon or were sensitive to universal sound-symbolism. The present study aimed to (...)
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  4.  8
    Jérôme Sueur & Almo Farina (2015). Ecoacoustics: The Ecological Investigation and Interpretation of Environmental Sound. Biosemiotics 8 (3):493-502.
    The sounds produced by animals have been a topic of research into animal behaviour for a very long time. If acoustic signals are undoubtedly a vehicle for exchanging information between individuals, environmental sounds embed as well a significant level of data related to the ecology of populations, communities and landscapes. The consideration of environmental sounds for ecological investigations opens up a field of research that we define with the term ecoacoustics. In this paper, we draw the contours of ecoacoustics by (...)
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  5. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Aesthetics as Investigation of Self, Subject, and Ethical Agency Under Trauma in Kawabata's Post-War Novel The Sound of the Mountain. Philosophy and Literature.
    Yasunari Kawabata’s 1952 novel The Sound of the Mountain is widely praised for its aesthetic qualities, from its adaptation of aesthetics from the Tale of Genji, through the beauty of its prose and the patterning of its images, to the references to arts and nature within the text. This article, by contrast, shows that Kawabata uses these features to demonstrate the effects of the mass trauma following the Second World War and the complicated grief it induced, on the psychology (...)
     
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  6.  74
    Adam Morton, Space and Sound: A Two Component Theory of Pitch Perception.
    I identify two components in the perception of musical pitches, which make pitch perception more like colour perception than it is usually taken to be. To back up this implausible claim I describe a programme whereby individuals can learn to identify the components in musical tones. I also claim that following this programme can affect one's pitch-recognition capacities.
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  7.  3
    Ashton Graybiel & J. I. Niven (1951). The Effect of a Change in Direction of Resultant Force on Sound Localization: The Audiogravic Illusion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (4):227.
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  8.  78
    Joseph Margolis (1960). Nothing Can Be Heard but Sound. Analysis 20 (4):82-87.
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  9.  63
    Robert Pasnau (2000). Sensible Qualities: The Case of Sound. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):27-40.
  10.  75
    Brian O'Shaughnessy (1957). The Location of Sound. Mind 66 (October):471-490.
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  11.  15
    H. A. Witkin, S. Wapner & T. Leventhal (1952). Sound Localization with Conflicting Visual and Auditory Cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (1):58.
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  12.  6
    H. B. Carlson (1940). A Simple, Inexpensive, and Portable Apparatus for Demonstrating the 'Phantom' Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (3):337.
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  13.  25
    James Van Cleve (2006). Touch, Sound, and Things Without the Mind. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):162-182.
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  14.  8
    G. J. Thomas (1941). Experimental Study of the Influence of Vision on Sound Localization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (2):163.
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  15.  7
    H. Wallach (1940). The Role of Head Movements and Vestibular and Visual Cues in Sound Localization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (4):339.
  16.  20
    Scot Gresham-Lancaster (2012). Relationships of Sonification to Music and Sound Art. AI and Society 27 (2):207-212.
    The definition of sonification has been reframed in recent years but remains somewhat in flux; the basic concepts and procedural flows have remained relatively unchanged. Recent definitions have focused on the objective the important uses of sonification in terms of scientific method. The full realization of the potential of the field must also include the craft and art of music composition. The author proposes examining techniques of sonification in a two-order framework: direct and procedural. The impact of new technologies and (...)
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  17.  6
    L. D. Goodfellow (1933). An Empirical Comparison of the Various Techniques Used in the Study of the Localization of Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (4):598.
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  18.  5
    Orvis C. Irwin (1948). Infant Speech: Speech Sound Development of Sibling and Only Infants. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):600.
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  19.  5
    F. L. Wells, C. M. Kelley & G. Murphy (1921). Comparative Simple Reactions to Light and Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (1):57.
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  20.  5
    E. G. Wever & C. W. Bray (1936). The Nature of Acoustic Response: The Relation Between Sound Intensity and the Magnitude of Responses in the Cochlea. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (2):129.
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  21.  2
    Michael Godkewitsch (1972). The Role of Language Habits in Understanding Letter Sound Sequences. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):63.
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  22.  2
    Franklin M. Henry (1948). Discrimination of the Duration of a Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (6):734.
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  23.  3
    Frank J. Tolkmitt (1974). Latency of Sound Localization as a Function of Azimuth and Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):310.
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  24.  2
    E. G. Wever & C. W. Bray (1942). The Stapedius Muscle in Relation to Sound Conduction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 31 (1):35.
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  25.  1
    D. Lewis & W. H. Lichte (1939). Analysis of a Perceptible Series of Partials in a Vocal Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (3):254.
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  26.  1
    G. D. Lovell & J. J. B. Morgan (1942). Physiological and Motor Responses to a Regularly Recurring Sound: A Study in Monotony. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (6):435.
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  27.  1
    C. H. Pearce (1937). Response in the Median Plane Localization of Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (2):101.
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  28.  2
    N. H. Kelley & S. N. Reger (1937). The Effect of Binaural Occlusion of the External Auditory Meati on the Sensitivity of the Normal Ear for Bone Conducted Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (2):211.
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  29.  2
    D. P. Boder & I. L. Goldman (1942). The Significance of Audible Onset as a Cue for Sound Localization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (3):262.
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  30.  16
    Nora M. Alter & Lutz P. Koepnick (eds.) (2004). Sound Matters: Essays on the Acoustics of Modern German Culture. Berghahn Books.
    ... composed by Herms Niel as a Durchhaltefanfare, a fanfare of perseverance, for the German troops that had been surrounded on the Crimea peninsula by ...
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  31. Don Ihde (1976). Listening And Voice: A Phenomenology Of Sound. Ohio University Press.
     
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  32. Inayat Khan (1996). The Mysticism of Sound and Music. Distributed in the United States by Random House.
    Music, according to Sufi teaching, is really a small expression of the overwhelming and perfect harmony of the whole universe--and that is the secret of its amazing power to move us. The Indian Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927), the first teacher to bring the Islamic mystical tradition to the West, was an accomplished musician himself. His lucid exposition of music's divine nature has become a modern classic, beloved only by those interested in Sufism but by musicians of all kinds.
     
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  33.  33
    Don Ihde (2007). Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound. Suny Press.
    Listening and Voice is an updated and expanded edition of Don Ihde's groundbreaking 1976 classic in the study of sound.
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  34.  45
    David Pugmire (2005). Sound Sentiments: Integrity in the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    What does it mean for emotion to be well-constituted? What distinguishes good feeling from (just) feeling good? Is there such a distinction at all? The answer to these questions becomes clearer if we realize that for an emotion to be all it seems, it must be responsible as well as responsive to what it is about. It may be that good feeling depends on feeling truly if we are to be really moved, moved in the way that avoids the need (...)
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  35. R. Casati, E. Di Bona & J. Dokic (2013). The Ockhamization of the Event Sources of Sound. Analysis 73 (3):462-466.
    There is one character too many in the triad sound, event source, thing source. As there are neither phenomenological nor metaphysical grounds for distinguishing sounds and sound sources, we propose to identify them.
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  36.  20
    Marc Champagne (2015). Sound Reasoning : Prospects and Challenges of Current Acoustic Logics. Logica Universalis 9 (3):331-343.
    Building on the notational principles of C. S. Peirce’s graphical logic, Pietarinen has tried to develop a propositional logic unfolding in the medium of sound. Apart from its intrinsic interest, this project serves as a concrete test of logic’s range. However, I argue that Pietarinen’s inaugural proposal, while promising, has an important shortcoming, since it cannot portray double-negation without thereby portraying a contradiction.
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  37.  81
    J. Kevin O'Regan & Ned Block (2012). Discussion of J. Kevin O'Regan's “Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of Philosophy (...)
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  38.  11
    Jeff Alan Stickney (2009). Wittgenstein's Contextualist Approach to Judging “Sound” Teaching: Escaping Enthrallment in Criteria-Based Assessments. Educational Theory 59 (2):197-215.
    Comparing the early, analytic attempt to define “sound” teaching with the current use of criteria‐based rating schemes, Jeff Stickney turns to Wittgenstein’s holistic, contextualist approach to judging teaching against its complex “background” within our form of life. To exemplify this approach, Stickney presents cases of classroom practice , auditioning dance students, teacher inspection, and mentoring student teachers. These examples highlight problems with the epistemological and criterial construal of teaching, in that both sets of rules tend to constrict unnecessarily the (...)
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  39.  76
    Gregory Fowler (2013). Against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes. Analysis 73 (3):466-473.
    I argue against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes (PSAE) – the view that an echo of a sound just is that sound. I then argue that if my case against PSAE is successful, distal theories of sound are false. The upshot of my arguments, if they succeed, is that distal theories are false. Towards the end, I show how some distal theories can be modified to avoid this conclusion and note some open questions to which (...)
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  40.  12
    Steve Goodman (2010). Sonic Warfare: Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear. MIT Press.
    An exploration of the production, transmission, and mutation of affective tonality—when sound helps produce a bad vibe.
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  41.  27
    M. Kiley-Worthington (1989). Ecological, Ethological, and Ethically Sound Environments for Animals: Toward Symbiosis. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (4):323-347.
    There are inconsistencies in the treatment and attitudes of human beings to animals and much confusion in thinking about what are appropriate conditions for using and keeping animals. This article outlines some of these considerations and then proposes guidelines for designing animal management systems. In the first place, the global and local ecological effects of all animal management systems must be considered and an environment designed that will not rock the biospherical boat. The main points to consider are the interrelatedness (...)
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  42.  30
    Nicolas J. Bullot & Paul Égré (2009). Editorial: Objects and Sound Perception. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):5-17.
    Editorial: Objects and Sound Perception Content Type Journal Article Pages 5-17 DOI 10.1007/s13164-009-0006-3 Authors Nicolas J. Bullot, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Centre de Recherches sur les Arts et le Langage (CRAL/CNRS) 96 Bd Raspail 75006 Paris France Paul Égré, Institut Jean-Nicod (ENS/EHESS/CNRS) Département d’Etudes Cognitives de l’ENS 29 rue d’Ulm 75005 Paris France Journal Review of Philosophy and Psychology Online ISSN 1878-5166 Print ISSN 1878-5158 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 1.
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  43.  25
    Larry Wos & Branden Fitelson, G The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Findin.
    The consideration of careful reasoning can be traced to Aristotle and earlier authors. The possibility of rigorous rules for drawing conclusions can certainly be traced to the Middle Ages when types o f syllogism were studied. Shortly after the introduction of computers, the audacious scientist naturally envisioned the automation of sound reasoning—reasoning in which conclusions that are drawn follow l ogically and inevitably from the given hypotheses. Did the idea spring from the intent to emulate s Sherlock Holmes and (...)
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  44. Don Ihde (2007). Listening and Voice: Phenomenologies of Sound, Second Edition. State University of New York Press.
    New and expanded edition of the now classic study in the phenomenology of sound.
     
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  45.  75
    Justin Skirry (2001). Sartre on William Faulkner's Metaphysics of Time in the Sound and the Fury. Sartre Studies International 7 (2):15-43.
    Jean Paul Sartre in his essay, "On 'The Sound and the Fury': Time in the work of Faulkner," states that the technique of the fiction writer always relates back to his metaphysics (OSF 79). Faulkner's clock-based or chronological metaphysics of time found in The Sound and the Fury is the focal point of Sartre's criticism of this work. His main criticism that the novel's metaphysics of time leaves its characters with only pasts and no futures led some Faulkner (...)
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  46.  13
    Branden Fitelson, G the Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Findin.
    The consideration of careful reasoning can be traced to Aristotle and earlier authors. The possibility of rigorous rules for drawing conclusions can certainly be traced to the Middle Ages when types o f syllogism were studied. Shortly after the introduction of computers, the audacious scientist naturally envisioned the automation of sound reasoning—reasoning in which conclusions that are drawn follow l ogically and inevitably from the given hypotheses. Did the idea spring from the intent to emulate..
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  47.  32
    Stefano Predelli (2006). The Sound of the Concerto. Against the Invariantist Approach to Musical Ontology. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):144-162.
    According to a popular approach to the ontology of music, the identity conditions for a musical work include the specification of properties of sound, which constrain the class of its correct performances. This essay argues that the resulting invariantist view of the work–performance relation is inadequate and defends a contextualist alternative.
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  48.  10
    A. Dufour, P. Touzalin, M. Moessinger, R. BRochard & O. Despres (2008). Visual Motion Disambiguation by a Subliminal Sound. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):790-797.
    There is growing interest in the effect of sound on visual motion perception. One model involves the illusion created when two identical objects moving towards each other on a two-dimensional visual display can be seen to either bounce off or stream through each other. Previous studies show that the large bias normally seen toward the streaming percept can be modulated by the presentation of an auditory event at the moment of coincidence. However, no reports to date provide sufficient evidence (...)
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  49.  24
    Henk van den Belt & Bart Gremmen (2002). Between Precautionary Principle and “Sound Science”: Distributing the Burdens of Proof. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (1):103-122.
    Opponents of biotechnology ofteninvoke the Precautionary Principle to advancetheir cause, whereas biotech enthusiasts preferto appeal to ``sound science.'' Publicauthorities are still groping for a usefuldefinition. A crucial issue in this debate isthe distribution of the burden of proof amongthe parties favoring and opposing certaintechnological developments. Indeed, the debateon the significance and scope of thePrecautionary Principle can be fruitfullyre-framed as a debate on the proper division ofburdens of proof. In this article, we attemptto arrive at a more refined way of (...)
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  50.  1
    Dov Gabbay (2008). A Sound And Complete Deductive System For Ctl* Verification. Logic Journal of the IGPL 16 (6):499-536.
    The paper presents a compositional approach to the verification of CTL* properties over reactive systems. Both symbolic model-checking and deductive verification are considered. Both methods are based on two decomposition principles. A general state formula is decomposed into basic state formulas which are CTL* formulas with no embedded path quantifiers. To deal with arbitrary basic state formulas, we introduce another reduction principle which replaces each basic path formula, i.e., path formulas whose principal operator is temporal and which contain no embedded (...)
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