Search results for 'Spatial Representation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  63
    Roberto Casati & Achille C. Varzi (1999). Parts and Places. The Structures of Spatial Representation. The MIT Press.
    Thinking about space is thinking about spatial things. The table is on the carpet; hence the carpet is under the table. The vase is in the box; hence the box is not in the vase. But what does it mean for an object to be somewhere? How are objects tied to the space they occupy? This book is concerned with these and other fundamental issues in the philosophy of spatial representation. Our starting point is an analysis of (...)
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  2. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423-460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess (...)
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  3.  35
    Jairo da Silva (2012). Husserl on Geometry and Spatial Representation. Axiomathes 22 (1):5-30.
    Husserl left many unpublished drafts explaining (or trying to) his views on spatial representation and geometry, such as, particularly, those collected in the second part of Studien zur Arithmetik und Geometrie (Hua XXI), but no completely articulate work on the subject. In this paper, I put forward an interpretation of what those views might have been. Husserl, I claim, distinguished among different conceptions of space, the space of perception (constituted from sensorial data by intentionally motivated psychic functions), that (...)
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  4.  22
    Jairo José Silva (2012). Husserl on Geometry and Spatial Representation. Axiomathes 22 (1):5-30.
    Husserl left many unpublished drafts explaining (or trying to) his views on spatial representation and geometry, such as, particularly, those collected in the second part of Studien zur Arithmetik und Geometrie (Hua XXI), but no completely articulate work on the subject. In this paper, I put forward an interpretation of what those views might have been. Husserl, I claim, distinguished among different conceptions of space, the space of perception (constituted from sensorial data by intentionally motivated psychic functions), that (...)
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  5. Rick Grush (2000). Self, World and Space: The Meaning and Mechanisms of Ego- and Allocentric Spatial Representation. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1 (1):59-92.
    b>: The problem of how physical systems, such as brains, come to represent themselves as subjects in an objective world is addressed. I develop an account of the requirements for this ability that draws on and refines work in a philosophical tradition that runs from Kant through Peter Strawson to Gareth Evans. The basic idea is that the ability to represent oneself as a subject in a world whose existence is independent of oneself involves the ability to represent space, and (...)
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  6. Naomi Eilan, Rosaleen A. McCarthy & Bill Brewer (eds.) (1993). Spatial Representation: Problems in Philosophy and Psychology. Blackwell.
    Spatial Representation presents original, specially written essays by leading psychologists and philosophers on a fascinating set of topics at the intersection of these two disciplines. They address such questions as these: Do the extraordinary navigational abilities of birds mean that these birds have the same kind of grip on the idea of a spatial world as we do? Is there a difference between the way sighted and blind subjects represent the world 'out there'? Does the study of (...)
     
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  7.  61
    Daniel Smyth (2014). Infinity and Givenness: Kant on the Intuitive Origin of Spatial Representation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (5-6):551-579.
    I advance a novel interpretation of Kant's argument that our original representation of space must be intuitive, according to which the intuitive status of spatial representation is secured by its infinitary structure. I defend a conception of intuitive representation as what must be given to the mind in order to be thought at all. Discursive representation, as modelled on the specific division of a highest genus into species, cannot account for infinite complexity. Because we represent (...)
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  8.  18
    David M. Kaplan (2013). The Complex Interplay Between Three-Dimensional Egocentric and Allocentric Spatial Representation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):553-554.
    Jeffery et al. characterize the egocentric/allocentric distinction as discrete. But paradoxically, much of the neural and behavioral evidence they adduce undermines a discrete distinction. More strikingly, their positive proposal reflects a more complex interplay between egocentric and allocentric coding than they acknowledge. Properly interpreted, their proposal about three-dimensional spatial representation contributes to recent work on embodied cognition.
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  9.  6
    Holger Schultheis & Thomas Barkowsky (2013). Just the Tip of the Iceberg: The Bicoded Map is but One Instantiation of Scalable Spatial Representation Structures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):565-566.
    Although the bicoded map constitutes an interesting candidate representation, proposing it as the predominant representation for three-dimensional space is too restrictive. We present and argue for scalable spatial representation structures as a more comprehensive alternative account that includes the bicoded map as a special case.
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  10. Naomi Eilan, Rosaleen McCarthy & Bill Brewer (eds.) (1999). Spatial Representation: Problems in Philosophy and Psychology. Clarendon Press.
    Spatial Representation presents original, specially written essays by leading psychologists and philosophers on a fascinating set of topics at the intersection of these two disciplines. Each of the five sections covers a central area of research into spatial cognition and opens with a short introduction by the editors, designed to facilitate cross-disciplinary reading. The volume offers a rich and compelling expression of the view that to advance our understanding of the way we represent the external world it (...)
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  11. Aarre Laakso (1999). The Significance of Spatial Representation. Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    This dissertation explores the fundamental role of spatial representation in constituting thought. The thesis of this dissertation is that spatial representation is a fundamental constituent of thought in two ways. First, reference is a metaphorical extension of grasping material objects located in physical space. Second, predication is the relative placement of representations of these referents in a high-dimensional neural activation space. Hence, spatial representation, albeit in two different senses, is fundamental to both reference and (...)
     
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  12. Naomi M. Eilan (ed.) (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  13.  61
    Bill Brewer (1992). Unilateral Neglect and the Objectivity of Spatial Representation. Mind and Language 7 (3):222-39.
    Patients may show a more-or-less complete deviation of the head and eyes towards the right (ipsilesional) side [that is, to the same side of egocentric space as the brain lesion responsible for their disorder]. If addressed by the examiner from the left (contralesional) side [the opposite side to their lesion], patients with severe extrapersonal neglect may fail to respond or may look for the speaker in the right side of the room, turning head and eyes more and more to the (...)
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  14. Patricia S. Churchland, Ilya B. Farber & Will Peterman (2001). The View From Here: The Nonsymbolic Structure of Spatial Representation. In Joao Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press
  15.  25
    Ranxiao Frances Wang & Elizabeth S. Spelke (2002). Human Spatial Representation: Insights From Animals. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):376-382.
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  16.  15
    E. Rusconi, B. Kwan, B. Giordano, C. Umilta & B. Butterworth (2006). Spatial Representation of Pitch Height: The SMARC Effect. Cognition 99 (2):113-129.
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  17.  6
    Ken Cheng (1986). A Purely Geometric Module in the Rat's Spatial Representation. Cognition 23 (2):149-178.
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  18. Edward Munnich, Barbara Landau & Barbara Anne Dosher (2001). Spatial Language and Spatial Representation: A Cross-Linguistic Comparison. Cognition 81 (3):171-208.
  19. William G. Hayward & Michael J. Tarr (1995). Spatial Language and Spatial Representation. Cognition 55 (1):39-84.
  20.  22
    Thomas Land (2014). Spatial Representation, Magnitude and the Two Stems of Cognition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (5-6):524-550.
    The aim of this paper is to show that attention to Kant's philosophy of mathematics sheds light on the doctrine that there are two stems of the cognitive capacity, which are distinct, but equally necessary for cognition. Specifically, I argue for the following four claims: The distinctive structure of outer sensible intuitions must be understood in terms of the concept of magnitude. The act of sensibly representing a magnitude involves a special act of spontaneity Kant ascribes to a capacity he (...)
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  21.  6
    L. Elizabeth Crawford, Skye M. Margolies, John T. Drake & Meghan E. Murphy (2006). Affect Biases Memory of Location: Evidence for the Spatial Representation of Affect. Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1153-1169.
  22.  2
    Barbara Landau (1991). Spatial Representation of Objects in the Young Blind Child. Cognition 38 (2):145-178.
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  23. L. Elizabeth Crawford, Skye M. Margolies, John T. Drake & Meghan E. Murphy (2006). Affect Biases Memory of Location: Evidence for the Spatial Representation of Affect. Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1153-1169.
  24. Bill Brewer (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  25.  16
    Rebecca Bull, Alexandra A. Cleland & Thomas Mitchell (2013). Sex Differences in the Spatial Representation of Number. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):181.
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  26.  24
    Edward Munnich & Barbara Landau (2003). The Effects of Spatial Language on Spatial Representation: Setting Some Boundaries. In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press 113--155.
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  27. Ruth G. Millikan (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  28. John O'Keefe (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  29.  8
    Helene Intraub (2004). Anticipatory Spatial Representation of 3D Regions Explored by Sighted Observers and a Deaf-and-Blind-Observer. Cognition 94 (1):19-37.
  30.  2
    Ulrich von Hecker, Ulrike Hahn & Jasmine Rollings (2016). Spatial Representation of Coherence. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (7):853-871.
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  31.  2
    Meng Zhang, Xuefei Gao, Baichen Li, Shuyuan Yu, Tianwei Gong, Ting Jiang, Qingfen Hu & Yinghe Chen (2016). Spatial Representation of Ordinal Information. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  32.  1
    Dietmar Heinke & Glyn W. Humphreys (2003). Attention, Spatial Representation, and Visual Neglect: Simulating Emergent Attention and Spatial Memory in the Selective Attention for Identification Model. Psychological Review 110 (1):29-87.
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  33.  13
    M. Rushworth (1998). The Nature of the Brain's Spatial Representation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):128.
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  34.  14
    Martin Giurfa & Randolf Menzel (2003). Human Spatial Representation Derived From a Honeybee Compass. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):59-60.
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  35. Carol L. Krumhansl & Edward J. Kessler (1982). Tracing the Dynamic Changes in Perceived Tonal Organization in a Spatial Representation of Musical Keys. Psychological Review 89 (4):334-368.
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  36.  41
    Marco Aiello (2001). Roberto Casati and Achille Varzi, Parts and Places, the Structures of Spatial Representation. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 10 (2):269-272.
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  37. Naomi M. Eilan, R. McCarthy & M. W. Brewer (eds.) (1993). Problems in the Philosophy and Psychology of Spatial Representation. Blackwell.
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  38. Andrew N. Meltzoff (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  39. Michael Tye (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  40.  3
    David J. Bryant (1993). Frames of Reference in the Spatial Representation System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):241.
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  41.  11
    Jerry R. Hobbs & Srini Narayanan (2002). Spatial Representation and Reasoning. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan
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  42.  20
    F. Mason (2001). Parts and Places: The Structures of Spatial Representation. Philosophical Review 110 (3):479-481.
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  43.  3
    Steven Pinker (1981). What Spatial Representation and Language Acquisition Don't Have in Common. Cognition 10 (1-3):243-248.
  44.  6
    Anneliese A. Pontius (1991). Cross-Evolutionary Spatial Representation in Stone-Age Ecology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):522-523.
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  45.  6
    Richard A. Anderson & David Zipser (1990). A Network Model for Learned Spatial Representation in the Posterior Parietal Cortex. In J. McGaugh, Jerry Weinberger & G. Lynch (eds.), Brain Organization and Memory. Guilford Press 271--284.
  46. Colin Richards (1993). Monumental Choreography: Architecture and Spatial Representation in Late Neolithic Orkney. In Christopher Y. Tilley (ed.), Interpretative Archaeology. Berg 143--78.
     
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  47.  2
    Efraim Sicher (1986). Binary Oppositions and Spatial Representation: Toward an Applied Semiotics. Semiotica 60 (3-4):211-224.
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  48.  2
    Kyriaki Tsoukala (2009). Spatial Representation, Activity, and Meaning: Children's Images of the Contemporary City. Semiotica 2009 (175):77-133.
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  49.  2
    Donald M. Wilkie & Robert J. Wilison (1989). Comparative Cognition of Spatial Representation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):97.
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  50.  2
    J. Atkinson, A Neurobiological Approach to the Development of 'Where' and 'What' Systems for Spatial Representation in Human Infants.
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