Search results for 'Spatial cognition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Glenn Gunzelmann (2011). Introduction to the Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):628-631.score: 242.0
    Our ability to process spatial information is fundamental for understanding and interacting with the environment, and it pervades other components of cognitive functioning from language to mathematics. Moreover, technological advances have produced new capabilities that have created research opportunities and astonishing applications. In this Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition, research crossing a variety of disciplines and methodologies is described, all focused on developing models to represent the capacities and limitations of human spatial cognition.
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  2. Madeleine Keehner (2011). Spatial Cognition Through the Keyhole: How Studying a Real-World Domain Can Inform Basic Science—and Vice Versa. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):632-647.score: 242.0
    This paper discusses spatial cognition in the domain of minimally invasive surgery. It draws on studies from this domain to shed light on a range of spatial cognitive processes and to consider individual differences in performance. In relation to modeling, the aim is to identify potential opportunities for characterizing the complex interplay between perception, action, and cognition, and to consider how theoretical models of the relevant processes might prove valuable for addressing applied questions about surgical performance (...)
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  3. David Moreau (forthcoming). Unreflective Actions? Complex Motor Skill Acquisition to Enhance Spatial Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-11.score: 230.0
    Cognitive science has recently moved toward action-integrated paradigms to account for some of its most remarkable findings. This novel approach has opened up new venues for the sport sciences. In particular, a large body of literature has investigated the relationship between complex motor practice and cognition, which in the sports domain has mostly concerned the effect of imagery and other forms of mental practice on motor skill acquisition and emotional control. Yet recent evidence indicates that this relationship is bidirectional: (...)
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  4. J. Gregory Trafton & Anthony M. Harrison (2011). Embodied Spatial Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):686-706.score: 224.0
    We present a spatial system called Specialized Egocentrically Coordinated Spaces embedded in an embodied cognitive architecture (ACT-R Embodied). We show how the spatial system works by modeling two different developmental findings: gaze-following and Level 1 perspective taking. The gaze-following model is based on an experiment by Corkum and Moore (1998), whereas the Level 1 visual perspective-taking model is based on an experiment by Moll and Tomasello (2006). The models run on an embodied robotic system.
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  5. Mark Wexler Sergiu Tcaci Popescu (2012). Spontaneous Body Movements in Spatial Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 216.0
    People often perform spontaneous body movements during spatial tasks such as giving complex directions or orienting themselves on maps. How are these spontaneous gestures related to spatial problem-solving? We measured spontaneous movements during a perspective-taking task inspired by map reading. Analyzing the motion data to isolate rotation and translation components of motion in specific geometric relation to the task, we found out that most participants executed spontaneous miniature rotations of the head that were significantly related to the main (...)
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  6. Scott D. Lathrop, Samuel Wintermute & John E. Laird (2011). Exploring the Functional Advantages of Spatial and Visual Cognition From an Architectural Perspective. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):796-818.score: 206.0
    We present a general cognitive architecture that tightly integrates symbolic, spatial, and visual representations. A key means to achieving this integration is allowing cognition to move freely between these modes, using mental imagery. The specific components and their integration are motivated by results from psychology, as well as the need for developing a functional and efficient implementation. We discuss functional benefits that result from the combination of multiple content-based representations and the specialized processing units associated with them. Instantiating (...)
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  7. Soonja Choi & Kate Hattrup (2012). Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization. Cognitive Science 36 (1):102-129.score: 206.0
    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources for categorization, and allocation between the two depended on the target relation and the features contrasted in the choices. Whereas perceptual/cognitive salience for containment and tight-fit features guided categorization in many contexts, language-specific semantics influenced categorization (...)
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  8. Olivier le Guen (2011). Speech and Gesture in Spatial Language and Cognition Among the Yucatec Mayas. Cognitive Science 35 (5):905-938.score: 206.0
    In previous analyses of the influence of language on cognition, speech has been the main channel examined. In studies conducted among Yucatec Mayas, efforts to determine the preferred frame of reference in use in this community have failed to reach an agreement (Bohnemeyer & Stolz, 2006; Levinson, 2003 vs. Le Guen, 2006, 2009). This paper argues for a multimodal analysis of language that encompasses gesture as well as speech, and shows that the preferred frame of reference in Yucatec Maya (...)
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  9. Frank C. Keil (2008). Space—the Primal Frontier? Spatial Cognition and the Origins of Concepts. Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):241 – 250.score: 180.0
    The more carefully we look, the more impressive the repertoire of infant concepts seems to be. Across a wide range of tasks, infants seem to be using concepts corresponding to surprisingly high-level and abstract categories and relations. It is tempting to try to explain these abilities in terms of a core capacity in spatial cognition that emerges very early in development and then gets extended beyond reasoning about direct spatial arrays and events. Although such a spatial (...)
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  10. Anne H. Weaver (2002). The Fossil Evidence for Spatial Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):424-425.score: 180.0
    Wynn's model for the evolution of spatial cognition is well supported by fossil evidence from brain endocasts, and from neurological studies of the cerebellum and the posterior parietal region of the cerebral cortex. Wynn's intriguing hypothesis that the spatial skill reflected in artifacts is an index of navigational ability, could be further explored by an analysis of lithic transport patterns.
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  11. Irwin Silverman (2002). Symmetry and Human Spatial Cognition: An Alternative Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):418-418.score: 180.0
    Wynn's thesis that the acquisition of the rules of symmetry comprised the formative factor in the evolution of human spatial cognition is questioned on several grounds, including the ubiquity of symmetry across species and the apparent hard-wired nature of its evolution in both humans and animals.
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  12. Kate A. Longstaffe, Bruce M. Hood & Iain D. Gilchrist (2013). Development of Human Spatial Cognition in a Three-Dimensional World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):556-556.score: 180.0
    Jeffery et al. accurately identify the importance of developing an understanding of spatial reference frames in a three-dimensional world. We examine human spatial cognition via a unique paradigm that investigates the role of saliency and adjusting reference frames. This includes work with adults, typically developing children, and children who develop non-typically (e.g., those with autism).
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  13. Carolyn Parkinson & Thalia Wheatley (2013). Old Cortex, New Contexts: Re-Purposing Spatial Perception for Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 180.0
  14. Elżbieta Łukasiewicz (2010). Husserl's Lebenswelt and the Problem of Spatial Cognition – in Search of Universals. Polish Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):23-43.score: 174.0
    Perception and conceptualization of space are some of the most basic elements of human cognition. It has been long assumed that human spatial thinkingand frames of reference used to grasp and describe the location of an object in relation to other objects are of universal nature and so are projected in naturallanguages in basically the same manner; three principal dimensions in egocentric perceptual space were distinguished: up-down, front-back and left-right, reflecting our biological make-up. If differences in spatial (...)
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  15. Christian Freksa, Thomas Barkowsky & Alexander Klippel (1999). Spatial Symbol Systems and Spatial Cognition: A Computer Science Perspective on Perception-Based Symbol Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):616-617.score: 162.0
    People often solve spatially presented cognitive problems more easily than their nonspatial counterparts. We explain this phenomenon by characterizing space as an inter-modality that provides common structure to different specific perceptual modalities. The usefulness of spatial structure for knowledge processing on different levels of granularity and for interaction between internal and external processes is described. Map representations are discussed as examples in which the usefulness of spatially organized symbols is particularly evident. External representations and processes can enhance internal representations (...)
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  16. Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff (1993). “What” and “Where” in Spatial Language and Spatial Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):217.score: 162.0
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  17. Katherine Elizabeth Vytal, Brian R. Cornwell, Nicole Esther Arkin, Allison M. Letkiewicz & Christian Grillon (2013). The Complex Interaction Between Anxiety and Cognition: Insight From Spatial and Verbal Working Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 156.0
    Anxiety can be distracting, disruptive, and incapacitating. Despite problems with empirical replication of this phenomenon, one fruitful avenue of study has emerged from working memory (WM) experiments where a translational method of anxiety induction (risk of shock) has been shown to disrupt spatial and verbal WM performance. Performance declines when resources (e.g., spatial attention, executive function) devoted to goal-directed behaviors are consumed by anxiety. Importantly, it has been shown that anxiety-related impairments in verbal WM depend on task difficulty, (...)
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  18. Martin H. Fischer & Peter Brugger (2011). When Digits Help Digits: Spatial–Numerical Associations Point to Finger Counting as Prime Example of Embodied Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 156.0
    Spatial-numerical associations (SNAs) are prevalent yet their origin is poorly understood. We first consider the possible prime role of reading habits in shaping SNAs and list three observations that argue against a prominent influence of this role: (1) directional reading habits for numbers may conflict with those for non-numerical symbols, (2) short-term experimental manipulations can overrule the impact of decades of reading experience, (3) SNAs predate the acquisition of reading. As a promising alternative, we discuss behavioral, neuroscientific and neuropsychological (...)
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  19. Daniel B. M. Haun, Christian J. Rapold, Gabriele Janzen & Stephen C. Levinson (2011). Plasticity of Human Spatial Cognition: Spatial Language and Cognition Covary Across Cultures. Cognition 119 (1):70-80.score: 156.0
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  20. Dedre Gentner, Asli Özyürek, Özge Gürcanli & Susan Goldin-Meadow (2013). Spatial Language Facilitates Spatial Cognition: Evidence From Children Who Lack Language Input. Cognition 127 (3):318-330.score: 156.0
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  21. Barbara Tversky (2009). Spatial Cognition: Embodied and Situated. In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge. 201--217.score: 156.0
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  22. Maurizio Tirassa, Antonella Carassa & Giuliano Geminiani (2000). A Theoretical Framework for the Study of Spatial Cognition. In [Book Chapter].score: 152.0
    We argue that the locomotion of organisms is better understood as a form of interaction with a subjective environment, rather than as a set of behaviors allegedly amenable to objective descriptions. An organism's interactions with its subjective environment are in turn understandable in terms of its cognitive architecture. We propose a large-scale classification of the possible types of cognitive architectures, giving a sketch of the subjective structure that each of them superimposes on space and of the relevant consequences on locomotion. (...)
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  23. Peter Collins (1997). Spatial Cognition: Parietal Cortex and Hippocampal Formation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):85-86.score: 152.0
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  24. Dedre Gentner (2007). Spatial Cognition in Apes and Humans. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):192-194.score: 152.0
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  25. David H. Uttal (2001). Making Sense of the Development of Spatial Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (7):316-317.score: 152.0
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  26. J. Gregory Trafton & Anthony M. Harrison (2011). Embodied Spatial Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):686-706.score: 152.0
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  27. G. Gunzelmann (forthcoming). Modeling Spatial Cognition [Special Issue](Vol. 3)(No. 4). Topics in Cognitive Science.score: 152.0
     
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  28. Peter W. Halligan, Gereon R. Fink, John C. Marshall & Giuseppe Vallar (2003). Spatial Cognition: Evidence From Visual Neglect. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):125-133.score: 152.0
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  29. S. B. Trickett, R. M. Ratwani & J. G. Trafton (forthcoming). Real-World Graph Comprehension: High-Level Questions, Complex Graphs, and Spatial Cognition. Cognitive Science.score: 152.0
     
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  30. Cynthia F. Moss (2013). Has a Fully Three-Dimensional Space Map Never Evolved in Any Species? A Comparative Imperative for Studies of Spatial Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):557-557.score: 150.0
    I propose that it is premature to assert that a fully three-dimensional map has never evolved in any species, as data are lacking to show that space coding in all animals is the same. Instead, I hypothesize that three-dimensional representation is tied to an animal's mode of locomotion through space. Testing this hypothesis requires a large body of comparative data.
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  31. Verner P. Bingman (1994). Remembering Spatial Cognition as a Hippocampal Functional Component. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):473-474.score: 150.0
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  32. Halle D. Brown (1993). The Role of Cerebral Lateralization in Expression of Spatial Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):240.score: 150.0
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  33. Carol L. Colby & Carl R. Olson (1999). Spatial Cognition. In M. J. Zigmond & F. E. Bloom (eds.), Fundamental Neuroscience. 1363--1383.score: 150.0
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  34. Erin C. Connors, Elizabeth R. Chrastil, Jaime Sã¡Nchez & Lotfi B. Merabet (2014). Action Video Game Play and Transfer of Navigation and Spatial Cognition Skills in Adolescents Who Are Blind. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  35. Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff (1993). Whence and Whither in Spatial Language and Spatial Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):255.score: 150.0
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  36. Daniel R. Montello (2001). Spatial Cognition. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 7--14771.score: 150.0
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  37. Nora S. Newcombe (2002). Spatial Cognition. In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.score: 150.0
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  38. David R. Olson & Ellen Bialystok (1982). 8 Spatial Cognition: The Mental. In. In B. De Gelder (ed.), Knowledge and Representation. Routledge & Kegan Paul. 121.score: 150.0
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  39. G. Steiner (1987). Spatial Reasoning in Small-Size and Large-Size Environments: In Search of Early Prefigurations of Spatial Cognition in Small-Size Environments. In B. Inhelder, D. De Caprona & A. Cornu-Wells (eds.), Piaget Today. Lawrence Erlbaum. 203--216.score: 150.0
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  40. Yue Chen (2003). Spatial Integration in Perception and Cognition: An Empirical Approach to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):86-87.score: 132.0
    Evidence for a dysfunction in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia is emerging, but it is not specific enough to prove (or disprove) this long-standing hypothesis. Many aspects of the external world are spatially mapped in the brain. A comprehensive internal representation relies on integration of information across space. Focus on spatial integration in the perceptual and cognitive processes will generate empirical data that shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
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  41. Anna Berti (2004). Cognition in Dyschiria: Edoardo Bisiach's Theory of Spatial Disorders and Consciousness. Cortex 40 (2):275-80.score: 132.0
     
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  42. Yi-hui Hung, Daisy L. Hung, Ovid J.-L. Tzeng & Denise H. Wu (2010). Corrigendum to “Flexible Spatial Mapping of Different Notations of Numbers in Chinese Readers” [Cognition 106 (3) (2008) 1441–1450]. [REVIEW] Cognition 116 (2):302-302.score: 126.0
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  43. Barbara Tversky & Bridgette Martin Hard (2009). Embodied and Disembodied Cognition: Spatial Perspective-Taking. Cognition 110 (1):124-129.score: 126.0
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  44. Russell P. Balda & Alan C. Kamil (2002). Spatial and Social Cognition in Corvids: An Evolutionary Approach. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. Mit Press. 129--134.score: 126.0
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  45. A. E. Goldberg, M. Haith, J. Benson, R. J. Roberts Jr, B. F. Pennington, W. Sinnott-Armstrong, D. Raffman, N. Asher, F. Karlsson & A. Voutilainen (1996). RH Logie, Visuo-Spatial Working Memory. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA. FN Dempster & CJ Brainerd, Interference and Inhibition in Cognition. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. TC Daddesio, On Minds and Symbols. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. R. McClamrock, Existential Cognition. Chicago: Chicago University Press. [REVIEW] Cognition 59:241-243.score: 126.0
     
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  46. Peter Woelert (2012). Idealization and External Symbolic Storage: The Epistemic and Technical Dimensions of Theoretic Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):335-366.score: 122.0
    This paper explores some of the constructive dimensions and specifics of human theoretic cognition, combining perspectives from (Husserlian) genetic phenomenology and distributed cognition approaches. I further consult recent psychological research concerning spatial and numerical cognition. The focus is on the nexus between the theoretic development of abstract, idealized geometrical and mathematical notions of space and the development and effective use of environmental cognitive support systems. In my discussion, I show that the evolution of the theoretic (...) of space apparently follows two opposing, but in truth, intrinsically aligned trajectories. On the epistemic plane, which is the main focus of Husserl’s genetic phenomenological investigations, theoretic conceptions of space are progressively constituted by way of an idealizing emancipation of spatial cognition from the concrete, embodied intentionality underlying the human organism’s perception of space. As a result of this emancipation, it ultimately becomes possible for the human mind to theoretically conceive of and posit space as an ideal entity that is universally geometrical and mathematical. At the same time, by synthesizing a range of literature on spatial and mathematical cognition, I illustrate that for the theoretic mind to undertake precisely this emancipating process successfully, and further, for an ideal and objective notion of geometrical and mathematical space to first of all become fully scientifically operative, the cognitive support provided by a range of specific symbolic technologies is central. These include lettered diagrams, notation systems, and more generally, the technique of formalization and require for their functioning various cognitively efficacious types of embodiment. Ultimately, this paper endeavors to understand the specific symbolic-technological dimensions that have been instrumental to major shifts in the development of idealized, scientific conceptions of space. The epistemic characteristics of these shifts have been previously discussed in genetic phenomenology, but without devoting sufficient attention to the constructive role of symbolic technologies. At the same time, this paper identifies some of the irreducible phenomenological and epistemic dimensions that characterize the functioning of the historically situated, embodied and distributed theoretic mind. (shrink)
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  47. Glenn Gunzelmann & Don R. Lyon (2011). Representations and Processes of Human Spatial Competence. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):741-759.score: 122.0
    This article presents an approach to understanding human spatial competence that focuses on the representations and processes of spatial cognition and how they are integrated with cognition more generally. The foundational theoretical argument for this research is that spatial information processing is central to cognition more generally, in the sense that it is brought to bear ubiquitously to improve the adaptivity and effectiveness of perception, cognitive processing, and motor action. We describe research spanning multiple (...)
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  48. Daniel B. M. Haun, Fiona M. Jordan, Giorgio Vallortigara & Nicky S. Clayton (2010). Origins of Spatial, Temporal and Numerical Cognition: Insights From Comparative Psychology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (12):552-560.score: 122.0
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  49. M. Keehner, M. Hegarty, C. Cohen, P. Khooshabeh & D. R. Montello (forthcoming). Spatial Reasoning with External Visualizations: The Role of Individual Differences in Distributed Cognition. Cognitive Science.score: 122.0
     
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  50. Michael A. Trestman (2013). The Cambrian Explosion and the Origins of Embodied Cognition. Biological Theory 8 (1):80-92.score: 120.0
    Around 540 million years ago there was a sudden, dramatic adaptive radiation known as the Cambrian Explosion. This event marked the origin of almost all of the phyla (major lineages characterized by fundamental body plans) of animals that would ever live on earth, as well the appearance of many notable features such as rigid skeletons and other hard parts, complex jointed appendages, eyes, and brains. This radical evolutionary event has been a major puzzle for evolutionary biologists since Darwin, and while (...)
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