Search results for 'Spatiality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  63
    Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013). The Δ-Quantum Machine, the K-Model, and the Non-Ordinary Spatiality of Quantum Entities. Foundations of Science 18 (1):11-41.
    The purpose of this article is threefold. Firstly, it aims to present, in an educational and non-technical fashion, the main ideas at the basis of Aerts’ creation-discovery view and hidden measurement approach : a fundamental explanatory framework whose importance, in this author’s view, has been seriously underappreciated by the physics community, despite its success in clarifying many conceptual challenges of quantum physics. Secondly, it aims to introduce a new quantum machine—that we call the δ quantum machine —which is able to (...)
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  2.  27
    Ruth Weintraub (1999). The Spatiality of the Mental and the Mind-Body Problem. Synthese 117 (3):409-17.
    I consider a seemingly attractive strategy for grappling with the mind-body problem. It is often thought that materialists are committed to spatially locating mental events, whereas dualists are barred from so doing. The thought naturally arises, then, that reasons for or against the spatiality of the mental may be wielded to adjudicate between the different positions in the mind-body dispute. Showing that mental events are spatially located, it may be thought, is ipso facto showing the truth of materialism. Conversely, (...)
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  3.  32
    Kirsten Jacobson (2006). The Interpersonal Expression of Human Spatiality: A Phenomenological Interpretation of Anorexia Nervosa. Chiasmi International 8:157-173.
    This paper extends Merleau-Ponty’s arguments regarding the interpersonal character of human spatiality and Bateson’s conception of the dynamically extended nature of consciousness. The central argument is that human communication is essentially spatial in nature, and that it is experienced and expressed as such. Using this analysis, the paper argues that Anorexia nervosa should not primarily be understood as an eating disorder, but rather as a spatially expressed and felt communication disorder. Moreover, it demonstrates that anorexia is not an illness (...)
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  4.  36
    Abraham Olivier (2006). The Spatiality of Pain. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):336-349.
    How far can one ascribe a spatial meaning to pain? When I have a pain, for instance, in my leg, how should one understand the “in” in the “pain in my leg”? I argue (contrary to Noordhof) that pain does have a spatial meaning, but (contrary to Tye) that the spatiality of pain is not to be understood in the standard sense of spatial enclosure. Instead, spatiality has a special meaning with regard to pain. By defining pain in (...)
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  5.  1
    Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013). The Δ-Quantum Machine, the K-Model, and the Non-Ordinary Spatiality of Quantum Entities. Foundations of Science 18 (1):11-41.
    The purpose of this article is threefold. Firstly, it aims to present, in an educational and non-technical fashion, the main ideas at the basis of Aerts’ creation-discovery view and hidden measurement approach: a fundamental explanatory framework whose importance, in this author’s view, has been seriously underappreciated by the physics community, despite its success in clarifying many conceptual challenges of quantum physics. Secondly, it aims to introduce a new quantum machine—that we call the δ quantum machine—which is able to reproduce the (...)
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  6.  1
    Milena Stefanova & Silvio Valentini (2011). Spatiality and Classical Logic. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 57 (4):432-440.
    In this short note we show that any proof of a general spatiality theorem for inductively generated formal topologies requires full classical logic. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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  7.  5
    Fabrizio Desideri (2016). Intermittency: The Differential of Time and the Integral of Space. The Intensive Spatiality of the Monad, the Apokatastasis and the Messianic World in Benjamin's Latest Thinking. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (1):177-187.
    The main topic of my paper concerns the theological-philosophical nexus between the intensive and qualitative spatiality of the Monad and the Origenian idea of Apokatastasis as a nexus that can clarify Benjamin's latest idea of the Messianic World. The first step will be, therefore, to explain Benjamin's use of the Origenian notion of Apokatastasis in his Essay on Leskov and in the Passagenwerk. Secondly, I will discuss how and to what extent such use is relevant for Benjamin's idea of (...)
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  8. Rick Grush (2007). Berkeley and the Spatiality of Vision. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):413-442.
    : Berkeley's Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision presents a theory of various aspects of the spatial content of visual experience that attempts to undercut not only the optico-geometric accounts of e.g., Descartes and Malebranche, but also elements of the empiricist account of Locke. My task in this paper is to shed light on some features of Berkeley's account that have not been adequately appreciated. After rehearsing a more detailed Lockean critique of the notion that depth is a proper (...)
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  9. Joel Krueger & Amanda Taylor Aiken (forthcoming). Losing Social Space: Phenomenological Disruptions of Spatiality and Embodiment in Moebius Syndrome and Schizophrenia. In Jack Reynolds & Ricky Sebold (eds.), Phenomenology and Science. Palgracve Macmillan
    We argue that a phenomenological approach to social space, as well as its relation to embodiment and affectivity, is crucial for understanding how the social world shows up as social in the first place—that is, as affording different forms of sharing, connection, and relatedness. We explore this idea by considering two cases where social space is experientially disrupted: Moebius Syndrome and schizophrenia. We show how this altered sense of social space emerges from subtle disruptions of embodiment and affectivity characteristic of (...)
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  10.  49
    Mariana Ortega (2004). Exiled Space, in‐Between Space: Existential Spatiality in Ana Mendieta'sSiluetasSeries. Philosophy and Geography 7 (1):25-41.
    Existential space is lived space, space permeated by our raced, gendered selves. It is representative of our very existence. The purpose of this essay is to explore the intersection between this lived space and art by analyzing the work of the Cuban?born artist Ana Mendieta and showing how her Siluetas Series discloses a space of exile. The first section discusses existential spatiality as explained by the phenomenologists Heidegger and Watsuji and as represented in Mendieta's Siluetas. The second section analyzes (...)
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  11.  7
    P. Sloterdijk (2012). Nearness and Da-Sein: The Spatiality of Being and Time. Theory, Culture and Society 29 (4-5):36-42.
    This paper focuses on the latent spatial philosophy in Heidegger’s ‘Being and Time’, highlighting a key aspect of the Heideggerian oeuvre that has mostly been overlooked by commentators. It outlines the concept of an original spatiality of being that is opposed to the philosophies of space in both physics and Cartesian metaphysics. Through an elaboration of the essentially relational character of Da-sein, it is argued that Heidegger’s vocabulary in ‘Being and Time’ yields an onto-topology that shows Da-sein’s primary spatial (...)
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  12.  30
    John Krummel (2006). Spatiality in the Later Heidegger: Turning - Clearing - Letting. Existentia (5-6):405-424.
    Within the context of Heidegger’s claim that his thinking has moved from the “meaning of being” to the “truth of being” and finally to the “place of being,” this paper examines the “spatial” motifs that become pronounced in his post-1930 attempts to think being apart from temporality. My contention is that his “shift” (Wendung) in thinking was a move beyond his earlier focus upon the project-horizon of the meaning (Sinn) of being, i.e., time, based on the existential hermeneutic of mortality, (...)
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  13.  5
    Tim Ireland (2015). The Spatiality of Being. Biosemiotics 8 (3):381-401.
    Space is a product of semiosis. It is a condition pertinent to an organism’s semiotic freedom, which is articulated by the organism as a consequence of its capacity to manipulate the world in the course of its unfolding interaction with its environment. Spatial configuration is thus the result of agency inherent in the organism-in-its-environment. Space, a consequence of social cohesion, is effected through constraints and processes of enaction which are semiotic. These processes are productive and offer architects a novel means (...)
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  14. J. Pickles (1985). Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    A work of outstanding originality and importance, which will become a cornerstone in the philosophy of geography, this book asks: What is human science? Is a truly human science of geography possible? What notions of spatiality adequately describe human spatial experience and behaviour? It sets out to answer these questions through a discussion of the nature of science in the human sciences, and, specifically, of the role of phenomenology in such inquiry. It criticises established understanding of phenomenology in these (...)
     
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  15.  20
    Gunnar Karlsson (1996). The Experience of Spatiality for Congenitally Blind People: A Phenomenological-Psychological Study. [REVIEW] Human Studies 19 (3):303 - 330.
    This phenomenological-psychological study aims at discovering the essential constituents involved in congenitally blind people's spatial experiences. Nine congenitally blind persons took part in this study. The data were made up of half structured (thorough) interviews. The analysis of the data yielded the following three comprehension forms of spatiality; (i) Comprehension in terms of image-experience; (ii) Comprehension in terms of notions; (iii) Comprehension in terms of knowledge.Comprehension in terms of image experience is the form which is most concretely and clearly (...)
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  16.  4
    David Kahan (2012). Textured Spatiality and the Art of Interpretation. Heythrop Journal 53 (2):204-216.
    In the twentieth century one interpretative perspective is curiously and strikingly absent: spatiality of narrative. Philosophical thought saw fundamental ontology as founded on temporality with space as decoration. Johannine inquiry has tended to follow in philosophy's temporal footsteps. However, it is plausible to assume that New Testament writers were spatially oriented while modern interpreters have been ensconced in temporal consciousness. Furthermore, as anthropology has long recognized, conceptions of space and place are central to any culture's sense of self. The (...)
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  17.  1
    Günter Figal (2013). To the Margins. On the Spatiality of Klee's Art. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):366-373.
    With reference mainly to Paul Klee’s Ad marginem from 1930 , this article focuses on space—namely, on the question of how space can be made visible as such. Having figures, lines, and the background establishing an intense interplay of transparency, Klee’s work refrains from displaying the mere spatiality of objects. It is this interplay of transparent figures entangled with their background that are withdrawing but not disappearing that creates an empty space that is as such limited and unoccupied. Compared (...)
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  18. Iris Marion Young (1980). Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment Motility and Spatiality. Human Studies 3 (1):137 - 156.
  19.  6
    Fausto Fraisopi (2016). Perspective and Spatiality in the Modern Age. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (1):115-133.
    the domain of Art critique and becoming a philosophical argument. How can we think of Perspective as symbolic Form? Is Perspective really a symbolic form? Why is Perspective so important? Because at the beginning of the Modern Age, Perspective as spiritual figure grounds many symbolic or even many scientific constructions. We could we say that perspective open the foundation of modern science as such. The “Geometrization” of Vision, beginning with perspective, will be for us the interpretative key in order to (...)
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  20. Desmond Hogan (2009). Three Kinds of Rationalism and the Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 355-382.
    In the transcendental aesthetic of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant claims that space and time are neither things in themselves nor properties of things in themselves but mere subjective forms of our sensible experience. Call this the Subjectivity Thesis. The striking conclusion follows an analysis of the representations of space and time. Kant argues that the two representations function as a priori conditions of experience, and are singular "intuitions" rather than general concepts. He also contends that the representations underwrite (...)
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  21. Henry E. Allison (1976). The Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves for Kant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.
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  22.  31
    Mauro Dorato (1999). Time, Relativity, and the Spatiality of Mental Events. In Maria Luisa Dalla Chiara (ed.), Language, Quantum, Music. 197--207.
  23.  19
    Corey Anton (2002). Discourse as Care: A Phenomenological Consideration of Spatiality and Temporality. [REVIEW] Human Studies 25 (2):185-205.
    Scholars increasingly recognize that discourse is not a standing collection of representations for pre-existing thoughts and/or things in a pre-existing world. Still, many obstacles remain, and these seem to be inseparable from contemporary common-sense. When we ask about the nature of discourse, we are, ultimately, asking about the nature of world, the nature of the body, and also, there must be, if only tacitly, an account of space and time. Discourse, I would suggest, is a mode of evaluative praxis, a (...)
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  24.  32
    Yoko Arisaka (1996). Spatiality Temporality and the Probelm of Foundation in Being and Time. Philosophy Today 40 (1):36-46.
  25.  31
    Anti Randviir (2007). On Spatiality in Tartu–Moscow Cultural Semiotics. Sign Systems Studies 35 (1-2):137-158.
    The article views the development of the Tartu–Moscow semiotic school from the analysis of texts to the study of spatial entities (semiosphere being most well known of them). It comes to light that ‘culture’ and ‘space’ have been such notions in Tartu–Moscow School to which, for instance, the ‘semiosphere’ does not add much. There are studied possibilities to join Uexküll’s and Lotman’s basic concepts (as certain grounds of Estonian semiotics) with Tartu–Moscow School’s treatment of culture and space through the notion (...)
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  26.  20
    Helena De Preester (2012). Equipment and Existential Spatiality: Heidegger, Cognitive Science and the Prosthetic Subject. In Julian Kiverstein & Michael Wheeler (eds.), Heidegger and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan
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  27.  26
    John Russon (2007). The Spatiality of Self-Consciousness: Originary Passivity in Kant, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Chiasmi International 9:209-220.
  28.  17
    Hoke Robinson (1985). The Spatiality of Inner Sense. Southwest Philosophy Review 2:55-66.
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  29.  15
    Robert Weingard (1977). Relativity and the Spatiality of Mental Events. Philosophical Studies 31 (4):279 - 284.
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  30.  8
    Kirsten Simonsen (2007). Practice, Spatiality and Embodied Emotions: An Outline of a Geography of Practice. Human Affairs 17 (2).
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  31.  29
    Leonard Lawlor (1982). Temporality and Spatiality: A Note to a Footnote in Jacques Derrida's Writing and Difference. Research in Phenomenology 12 (1):149-165.
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  32.  21
    Jim Drobnick (2002). Toposmia: Art, Scent, and Interrogations of Spatiality. Angelaki 7 (1):31 – 47.
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  33.  20
    David B. Greene (1983). Consciousness, Spatiality and Pictorial Space. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (4):375-385.
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  34.  6
    G. D. Neri (1992). Earth and Sky: An Analysis of Husserl's 1934 Manuscript on "The Spatiality of Nature". Télos 1992 (92):63-84.
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  35.  18
    J. Wilberding (2005). " Creeping Spatiality": The Location of Nous in Plotinus' Universe. Phronesis 50 (4):315 - 334.
    There is a well-known tension in Plotinus' thought regarding the location of the intelligible region. He appears to make three mutually incompatible claims about it: (1) it is everywhere; (2) it is nowhere; and (3) it borders on the heavens, where the third claim is associated with Plotinus' affection for cosmic religion. Traditionally, although scholars have found a reasonable way to make sense of the compatibility of the first two claims, they have sought to relieve the tension generated by (3) (...)
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  36.  3
    Jayson Harsin (2014). Public Argument in the New Media Ecology: Implications of Temporality, Spatiality, and Cognition. Journal of Argumentation in Context 3 (1):7-34.
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  37.  13
    Wilberding (2005). "Creeping Spatiality": The Location of Nous in Plotinus' Universe. Phronesis 50 (4):315-334.
    There is a well-known tension in Plotinus' thought regarding the location of the intelligible region. He appears to make three mutually incompatible claims about it: (1) it is everywhere; (2) it is nowhere; and (3) it borders on the heavens, where the third claim is associated with Plotinus' affection for cosmic religion. Traditionally, although scholars have found a reasonable way to make sense of the compatibility of the first two claims, they have sought to relieve the tension generated by (3) (...)
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  38.  3
    Carly Thomsen (2015). The Post‐Raciality and Post‐Spatiality of Calls for LGBTQ and Disability Visibility. Hypatia 30 (1):149-166.
    In this article, I consider the ideologies that emerge when disability and LGBTQ rights advocates' ubiquitous calls for visibility collide. I argue that contemporary visibility politics encourage the production of post-racial and post-spatial ideologies. In demanding visibility, disability and LGBTQ rights advocates ignore, ironically, visible markers of difference and assume that being “out, loud, and proud” is desirable trans-geographically. I bring together disability studies and queer rural studies—fields that have engaged in remarkably little dialogue—to analyze activist calls for LGBTQ and (...)
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  39.  3
    Shannon Gayk (2010). Carmel Bendon Davis, Mysticism and Space: Space and Spatiality in the Works of Richard Rolle, “The Cloud of Unknowing” Author, and Julian of Norwich. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2008. Pp. Xv, 271. $74.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (2):382-383.
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  40.  2
    Frank Schalow (1996). Thought and Spatiality. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):157-170.
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  41.  4
    S. Gallagher (2007). The Spatiality of Situation: Comment on Legrand Et Al.☆☆☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):700-702.
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  42.  1
    Lewis S. Ford (1968). Whitehead's Conception of Divine Spatiality. Southern Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):1-13.
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  43. Thomas Campaner (2007). Abstract: “Dark” or “Invisible”: Expressive Senses of Musical Spatiality. Chiasmi International 9:275-275.
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  44. John Corrigan (2009). Spatiality and Religion. In Barney Warf & Santa Arias (eds.), The Spatial Turn: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge
     
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  45. Hogan Desmond (2009). Three Kinds of Rationalism and the Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves: KantImmanuel,.1724-1804. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):355-382.
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  46. Robert Frodeman (1992). Being and Space+ Heidegger Criticism-a Rereading of Existential Spatiality In'being and Time'. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 23 (1):33-41.
     
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  47. Katharina Gerstenberger (2010). Mapping Spaces. Mapping Vision: Goethe, Cartography, and the Novel / Andrew Piper ; Just How Naughty Was Berlin? The Geography of Prostitution and Female Sexuality in Curt Moreck's Erotic Travel Guide / Jill Suzanne Smith ; Mapping a Human Geography: Spatiality in Uwe Johnson's Mutmassungen Über Jakob [Speculations About Jakob, 1959] / Jennifer Marston William ; Historical Space: Daniel Kehlmann's Die Vermessung der Welt [Measuring the World, 2005]. [REVIEW] In Jaimey Fisher & Barbara Caroline Mennel (eds.), Spatial Turns: Space, Place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture. Rodopi
     
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  48. Dimitri Ginev (2011). From Existential Spatiality To The Metric Science Of Space. Existentia 21 (1-2):179-198.
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  49. Barbara Kosta (2010). Spaces of Encounter. From the Desert to the City and Back: Nomads and the Spaces of Goethe's West-Östlicher Divan [West-Eastern Divan, 1819/1827] / Kamaal Haque ; Not All Who Wander Are Lost: Alfred Döblin's Reise in Polen [Journey to Poland, 1925] / June J. Hwang ; The Feminine Topography of Zion: Mapping Gertrud Kolmar's Poetic Imagination / Carola Daffner ; Jewish Colonia as Heimat in the Pampas: Robert Schopflocher's Explorations of Thirdspace in Argentina / Will Lehman ; Rewriting Home and Migration: Spatiality in the Narratives of Emine Sevgi Özdamar / Silke Schade ; Transcultural Space and Music: Fatih Akin's Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul (2005). [REVIEW] In Jaimey Fisher & Barbara Caroline Mennel (eds.), Spatial Turns: Space, Place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture. Rodopi
     
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  50. Tim Luke & G. OTuathail (2000). The Spatiality of War, Speed and Vision in the Work of Paul Virilio. In Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.), Thinking Space. Routledge 9--360.
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