Search results for 'Spatiality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013). The Δ-Quantum Machine, the K-Model, and the Non-Ordinary Spatiality of Quantum Entities. Foundations of Science 18 (1):11-41.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this article is threefold. Firstly, it aims to present, in an educational and non-technical fashion, the main ideas at the basis of Aerts’ creation-discovery view and hidden measurement approach : a fundamental explanatory framework whose importance, in this author’s view, has been seriously underappreciated by the physics community, despite its success in clarifying many conceptual challenges of quantum physics. Secondly, it aims to introduce a new quantum machine—that we call the δ quantum machine —which is able to (...)
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  2. Abraham Olivier (2006). The Spatiality of Pain. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):336-349.score: 18.0
    How far can one ascribe a spatial meaning to pain? When I have a pain, for instance, in my leg, how should one understand the “in” in the “pain in my leg”? I argue (contrary to Noordhof) that pain does have a spatial meaning, but (contrary to Tye) that the spatiality of pain is not to be understood in the standard sense of spatial enclosure. Instead, spatiality has a special meaning with regard to pain. By defining pain in (...)
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  3. Kirsten Jacobson (2006). The Interpersonal Expression of Human Spatiality: A Phenomenological Interpretation of Anorexia Nervosa. Chiasmi International 8:157-173.score: 18.0
    This paper extends Merleau-Ponty’s arguments regarding the interpersonal character of human spatiality and Bateson’s conception of the dynamically extended nature of consciousness. The central argument is that human communication is essentially spatial in nature, and that it is experienced and expressed as such. Using this analysis, the paper argues that Anorexia nervosa should not primarily be understood as an eating disorder, but rather as a spatially expressed and felt communication disorder. Moreover, it demonstrates that anorexia is not an illness (...)
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  4. Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013). The Δ-Quantum Machine, the K-Model, and the Non-Ordinary Spatiality of Quantum Entities. Foundations of Science 18 (1):11-41.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this article is threefold. Firstly, it aims to present, in an educational and non-technical fashion, the main ideas at the basis of Aerts’ creation-discovery view and hidden measurement approach: a fundamental explanatory framework whose importance, in this author’s view, has been seriously underappreciated by the physics community, despite its success in clarifying many conceptual challenges of quantum physics. Secondly, it aims to introduce a new quantum machine—that we call the δ quantum machine—which is able to reproduce the (...)
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  5. Ruth Weintraub (1999). The Spatiality of the Mental and the Mind-Body Problem. Synthese 117 (3):409-17.score: 15.0
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  6. Milena Stefanova & Silvio Valentini (2011). Spatiality and Classical Logic. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 57 (4):432-440.score: 15.0
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  7. Mariana Ortega (2004). Exiled Space, in‐Between Space: Existential Spatiality in Ana Mendieta'sSiluetasSeries. Philosophy and Geography 7 (1):25-41.score: 12.0
    Existential space is lived space, space permeated by our raced, gendered selves. It is representative of our very existence. The purpose of this essay is to explore the intersection between this lived space and art by analyzing the work of the Cuban?born artist Ana Mendieta and showing how her Siluetas Series discloses a space of exile. The first section discusses existential spatiality as explained by the phenomenologists Heidegger and Watsuji and as represented in Mendieta's Siluetas. The second section analyzes (...)
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  8. Rick Grush (2007). Berkeley and the Spatiality of Vision. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):413-442.score: 12.0
    : Berkeley's Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision presents a theory of various aspects of the spatial content of visual experience that attempts to undercut not only the optico-geometric accounts of e.g., Descartes and Malebranche, but also elements of the empiricist account of Locke. My task in this paper is to shed light on some features of Berkeley's account that have not been adequately appreciated. After rehearsing a more detailed Lockean critique of the notion that depth is a proper (...)
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  9. Diarmid A. Finnegan (2008). The Spatial Turn: Geographical Approaches in the History of Science. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (2):369 - 388.score: 12.0
    Over the past decade or so a number of historians of science and historical geographers, alert to the situated nature of scientific knowledge production and reception and to the migratory patterns of science on the move, have called for more explicit treatment of the geographies of past scientific knowledge. Closely linked to work in the sociology of scientific knowledge and science studies and connected with a heightened interest in spatiality evident across the humanities and social sciences this 'spatial (...)' has informed a wide-ranging body of work on the history of science. This discussion essay revisits some of the theoretical props supporting this turn to space and provides a number of worked examples from the history of the life sciences that demonstrate the different ways in which the spaces of science have been comprehended. (shrink)
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  10. Gunnar Karlsson (1996). The Experience of Spatiality for Congenitally Blind People: A Phenomenological-Psychological Study. [REVIEW] Human Studies 19 (3):303 - 330.score: 12.0
    This phenomenological-psychological study aims at discovering the essential constituents involved in congenitally blind people's spatial experiences. Nine congenitally blind persons took part in this study. The data were made up of half structured (thorough) interviews. The analysis of the data yielded the following three comprehension forms of spatiality; (i) Comprehension in terms of image-experience; (ii) Comprehension in terms of notions; (iii) Comprehension in terms of knowledge.Comprehension in terms of image experience is the form which is most concretely and clearly (...)
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  11. David Kahan (2012). Textured Spatiality and the Art of Interpretation. Heythrop Journal 53 (2):204-216.score: 12.0
    In the twentieth century one interpretative perspective is curiously and strikingly absent: spatiality of narrative. Philosophical thought saw fundamental ontology as founded on temporality with space as decoration. Johannine inquiry has tended to follow in philosophy's temporal footsteps. However, it is plausible to assume that New Testament writers were spatially oriented while modern interpreters have been ensconced in temporal consciousness. Furthermore, as anthropology has long recognized, conceptions of space and place are central to any culture's sense of self. The (...)
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  12. John Krummel (2006). Spatiality in the Later Heidegger: Turning - Clearing - Letting. Existentia (5-6):405-424.score: 12.0
    Within the context of Heidegger’s claim that his thinking has moved from the “meaning of being” to the “truth of being” and finally to the “place of being,” this paper examines the “spatial” motifs that become pronounced in his post-1930 attempts to think being apart from temporality. My contention is that his “shift” (Wendung) in thinking was a move beyond his earlier focus upon the project-horizon of the meaning (Sinn) of being, i.e., time, based on the existential hermeneutic of mortality, (...)
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  13. J. Pickles (1985). Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    A work of outstanding originality and importance, which will become a cornerstone in the philosophy of geography, this book asks: What is human science? Is a truly human science of geography possible? What notions of spatiality adequately describe human spatial experience and behaviour? It sets out to answer these questions through a discussion of the nature of science in the human sciences, and, specifically, of the role of phenomenology in such inquiry. It criticises established understanding of phenomenology in these (...)
     
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  14. Gary Hatfield (1991). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz. Cambridge: MIT Press.score: 10.0
    Gary Hatfield examines theories of spatial perception from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century and provides a detailed analysis of the works of Kant and...
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  15. John Campbell (1993). The Role of Physical Objects in Spatial Thinking. In Naomi M. Eilan, R. McCarthy & M. W. Brewer (eds.), Problems in the Philosophy and Psychology of Spatial Representation. Blackwell.score: 10.0
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  16. Anti Randviir (2007). On Spatiality in Tartu–Moscow Cultural Semiotics. Sign Systems Studies 35 (1-2):137-158.score: 10.0
    The article views the development of the Tartu–Moscow semiotic school from the analysis of texts to the study of spatial entities (semiosphere being most well known of them). It comes to light that ‘culture’ and ‘space’ have been such notions in Tartu–Moscow School to which, for instance, the ‘semiosphere’ does not add much. There are studied possibilities to join Uexküll’s and Lotman’s basic concepts (as certain grounds of Estonian semiotics) with Tartu–Moscow School’s treatment of culture and space through the notion (...)
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  17. Corey Anton (2002). Discourse as Care: A Phenomenological Consideration of Spatiality and Temporality. [REVIEW] Human Studies 25 (2):185-205.score: 10.0
    Scholars increasingly recognize that discourse is not a standing collection of representations for pre-existing thoughts and/or things in a pre-existing world. Still, many obstacles remain, and these seem to be inseparable from contemporary common-sense. When we ask about the nature of discourse, we are, ultimately, asking about the nature of world, the nature of the body, and also, there must be, if only tacitly, an account of space and time. Discourse, I would suggest, is a mode of (...)
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  18. J. Wilberding (2005). " Creeping Spatiality": The Location of Nous in Plotinus' Universe. Phronesis 50 (4):315 - 334.score: 10.0
    There is a well-known tension in Plotinus' thought regarding the location of the intelligible region. He appears to make three mutually incompatible claims about it: (1) it is everywhere; (2) it is nowhere; and (3) it borders on the heavens, where the third claim is associated with Plotinus' affection for cosmic religion. Traditionally, although scholars have found a reasonable way to make sense of the compatibility of the first two claims, they have sought to relieve the tension generated by (3) (...)
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  19. Wilberding (2005). "Creeping Spatiality": The Location of Nous in Plotinus' Universe. Phronesis 50 (4):315-334.score: 10.0
    There is a well-known tension in Plotinus' thought regarding the location of the intelligible region. He appears to make three mutually incompatible claims about it: (1) it is everywhere; (2) it is nowhere; and (3) it borders on the heavens, where the third claim is associated with Plotinus' affection for cosmic religion. Traditionally, although scholars have found a reasonable way to make sense of the compatibility of the first two claims, they have sought to relieve the tension generated by (3) (...)
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  20. Bill Brewer (1993). The Integration of Spatial Vision and Action. In Naomi M. Eilan (ed.), Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.score: 10.0
     
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  21. John Corrigan (2009). Spatiality and Religion. In Barney Warf & Santa Arias (eds.), The Spatial Turn: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge.score: 10.0
     
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  22. Katharina Gerstenberger (2010). Mapping Spaces. Mapping Vision: Goethe, Cartography, and the Novel / Andrew Piper ; Just How Naughty Was Berlin? The Geography of Prostitution and Female Sexuality in Curt Moreck's Erotic Travel Guide / Jill Suzanne Smith ; Mapping a Human Geography: Spatiality in Uwe Johnson's Mutmassungen Über Jakob [Speculations About Jakob, 1959] / Jennifer Marston William ; Historical Space: Daniel Kehlmann's Die Vermessung der Welt [Measuring the World, 2005]. [REVIEW] In Jaimey Fisher & Barbara Caroline Mennel (eds.), Spatial Turns: Space, Place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture. Rodopi.score: 10.0
     
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  23. Barbara Kosta (2010). Spaces of Encounter. From the Desert to the City and Back: Nomads and the Spaces of Goethe's West-Östlicher Divan [West-Eastern Divan, 1819/1827] / Kamaal Haque ; Not All Who Wander Are Lost: Alfred Döblin's Reise in Polen [Journey to Poland, 1925] / June J. Hwang ; The Feminine Topography of Zion: Mapping Gertrud Kolmar's Poetic Imagination / Carola Daffner ; Jewish Colonia as Heimat in the Pampas: Robert Schopflocher's Explorations of Thirdspace in Argentina / Will Lehman ; Rewriting Home and Migration: Spatiality in the Narratives of Emine Sevgi Özdamar / Silke Schade ; Transcultural Space and Music: Fatih Akin's Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul (2005). [REVIEW] In Jaimey Fisher & Barbara Caroline Mennel (eds.), Spatial Turns: Space, Place, and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture. Rodopi.score: 10.0
     
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  24. Iris Marion Young (1980). Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment Motility and Spatiality. Human Studies 3 (1):137 - 156.score: 9.0
  25. Desmond Hogan (2009). Three Kinds of Rationalism and the Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 355-382.score: 9.0
  26. Henry E. Allison (1976). The Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves for Kant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.score: 9.0
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  27. Naomi M. Eilan (ed.) (1993). Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.score: 9.0
  28. Yoko Arisaka (1996). Spatiality Temporality and the Probelm of Foundation in Being and Time. Philosophy Today 40 (1):36-46.score: 9.0
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  29. Bill Brewer (1992). Unilateral Neglect and the Objectivity of Spatial Representation. Mind and Language 7 (3):222-39.score: 9.0
    Patients may show a more-or-less complete deviation of the head and eyes towards the right (ipsilesional) side [that is, to the same side of egocentric space as the brain lesion responsible for their disorder]. If addressed by the examiner from the left (contralesional) side [the opposite side to their lesion], patients with severe extrapersonal neglect may fail to respond or may look for the speaker in the right side of the room, turning head and eyes more and more to the (...)
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  30. Michael Marder (2012). Phenomenology of Distraction, or Attention in the Fissuring of Time and Space. Research in Phenomenology 41 (3):396-419.score: 9.0
    The goal of “Phenomenology of Distraction“ is to explore the imbrication of attention and distraction within existential spatiality and temporality. First, I juxtapose the Heideggerian dispersion of concern (which includes, among other things, the attentive comportment) in everyday life, conceived as a way to get distracted from one's impending mortality, to Fernando Pessoa's embracing of the inauthentic, superficial, and restless existence, where attention necessarily reverts into distraction. Second, I consider the philosophical confessions of St. Augustine and Jean-Jacques Rousseau as (...)
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  31. David B. Greene (1983). Consciousness, Spatiality and Pictorial Space. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (4):375-385.score: 9.0
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  32. Leonard Lawlor (1982). Temporality and Spatiality: A Note to a Footnote in Jacques Derrida's Writing and Difference. Research in Phenomenology 12 (1):149-165.score: 9.0
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  33. Jim Drobnick (2002). Toposmia: Art, Scent, and Interrogations of Spatiality. Angelaki 7 (1):31 – 47.score: 9.0
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  34. Robert Weingard (1977). Relativity and the Spatiality of Mental Events. Philosophical Studies 31 (4):279 - 284.score: 9.0
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  35. Felice Masi (2012). Il verso della dissoluzione e quello della caduta. Notizie sull'orientamento architettonico tra Th. Lipps e H. van der Laan. [REVIEW] Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 5 (2).score: 9.0
    The paper aims at drawing the main lines of a reflection about architectonic space, starting from the comparison between two hypothesis, as much as ever different: Theodor Lipps’ spatial aesthetics and Hans van der Laan’s elemental theory. The emphasis given by both authors to the intersection between directions and way, but also to the mutual subordination between thing and space, allows to rewrite the obituary of architecture as a spatial art, according to which the Modern Style has turned the (...) into its specular visibility, into the spaciousness, into the indefinite continuity of the Bigness. (shrink)
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  36. A. Olding (1980). Frank Jackson and the Spatial Distribution of Sense-Data. Analysis 40 (June):158-162.score: 9.0
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  37. Sybille Krämer (forthcoming). Mathematizing Power, Formalization, and the Diagrammatical Mind Or: What Does “Computation” Mean? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology:1-13.score: 9.0
    Computation and formalization are not modalities of pure abstractive operations. The essay tries to revise the assumption of the constitutive nonsensuality of the formal. The argument is that formalization is a kind of linear spatialization, which has significant visual dimensions. Thus, a connection can be discovered between visualization by figurative graphism and formalization by symbolic calculations: Both use spatial relations not only to represent but also to operate on epistemic, nonspatial, nonvisual entities. Descartes was one of the pioneers of using (...)
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  38. Zhenming Zhai (2008). Vision-Centrality and the Reflexive-Identity of External Object. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):55-66.score: 9.0
    The correspondence of a sensory object to the category of a descriptive statement requires a reflexive-identity of the object, and such a reflexive-identity is primarily based on the cognition of spatiality. Spatiality is, however, constituted through visual perception. There are only two occasions on which definitive reflexive-identity is exemplified: the infinitesimal point and the infinite “One,” and others are just human stipulations that meet pragmatic needs of rough identification of things at hand. However, if a spatial point is (...)
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  39. Hoke Robinson (1985). The Spatiality of Inner Sense. Southwest Philosophy Review 2:55-66.score: 9.0
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  40. John Russon (2007). The Spatiality of Self-Consciousness: Originary Passivity in Kant, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Chiasmi International 9:209-220.score: 9.0
  41. S. Gallagher (2007). The Spatiality of Situation: Comment on Legrand Et Al.☆☆☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):700-702.score: 9.0
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  42. W. J. Holly (1986). The Spatial Coordinates of Pain. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (July):343-356.score: 9.0
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  43. Patricia S. Churchland, Ilya B. Farber & Will Peterman (2001). The View From Here: The Nonsymbolic Structure of Spatial Representation. In Joao Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 9.0
  44. Günter Figal (2013). To the Margins. On the Spatiality of Klee's Art. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):366-373.score: 9.0
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  45. Lewis S. Ford (1968). Whitehead's Conception of Divine Spatiality. Southern Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):1-13.score: 9.0
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  46. G. D. Neri (1992). Earth and Sky: An Analysis of Husserl's 1934 Manuscript on "The Spatiality of Nature". Telos 1992 (92):63-84.score: 9.0
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  47. Frank Schalow (1996). Thought and Spatiality. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):157-170.score: 9.0
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  48. Kirsten Simonsen (2007). Practice, Spatiality and Embodied Emotions: An Outline of a Geography of Practice. Human Affairs 17 (2).score: 9.0
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  49. Zhai Zhenming & Wang Xiulu (2008). Vision-Centrality and the Reflexive-Identity of External Object. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):55 - 66.score: 9.0
    The correspondence of a sensory object to the category of a descriptive statement requires a reflexive-identity of the object, and such a reflexive-identity is primarily based on the cognition of spatiality. Spatiality is, however, constituted through visual perception. There are only two occasions on which definitive reflexive-identity is exemplified: the infinitesimal point and the infinite "One," and others are just human stipulations that meet pragmatic needs of rough identification of things at hand. However, if a spatial point is (...)
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  50. Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2011). Ephemeral Properties and the Illusion of Microscopic Particles. Foundations of Science 16 (4):393-409.score: 7.0
    Founding our analysis on the Geneva-Brussels approach to quantum mechanics, we use conventional macroscopic objects as guiding examples to clarify the content of two important results of the beginning of twentieth century: Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen’s reality criterion and Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. We then use them in combination to show that our widespread belief in the existence of microscopic particles is only the result of a cognitive illusion, as microscopic particles are not particles, but are instead the ephemeral spatial and local manifestations of (...)
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