Search results for 'Spatialization' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Sebastian Fedden & Lera Boroditsky (2012). Spatialization of Time in Mian. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    We examine representations of time among the Mianmin of Papua New Guinea. We begin by describing the patterns of spatial and temporal reference in Mian. Mian uses a system of spatial terms that derive from the orientation and direction of the Hak and Sek rivers and the surrounding landscape. We then report results from a temporal arrangement task administered to a group of Mian speakers. The results reveal evidence for a variety of temporal representations. Some participants arranged time with respect (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. William V. Spanos (1970). Modern Literary Criticism and the Spatialization of Time: An Existential Critique. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (1):87-104.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Patrick Grim, Stephanie Wardach & Vincent Beltrani (2006). Location, Location, Location: The Importance of Spatialization in Modeling Cooperation and Communication. Interaction Studies 7 (1):43-78.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Catherine Pickstock (2009). Spatialization : The Middle of Modernity. In Simon Oliver & John Milbank (eds.), The Radical Orthodoxy Reader. Routledge.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Anti Randviir (2004). Spatialization of Knowledge: Cartographic Roots of Globalization. Semiotica 2004 (150).score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Rob Shields (1997). Spatial Stress and Resistance: Social Meanings of Spatialization. In Georges Benko & Ulf Strohmayer (eds.), Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Blackwell Publishers. 33--186.score: 10.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Barry Smith & Achille C. Varzi (1997). Fiat and Bona Fide Boundaries: Towards an Ontology of Spatially Extended Objects. In Spatial Information Theory. International Conference COSIT ‘97. Springer. 103–119.score: 9.0
    Human cognitive acts are directed towards objects extended in space of a wide range of different types. What follows is a new proposal for bringing order into this typological clutter. The theory of spatially extended objects should make room not only for the objects of physics but also for objects at higher levels, including the objects of geography and of related disciplines. It should leave room for different types of boundaries, including both the bona fide boundaries which we find in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.score: 8.0
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John Schwenkler (2012). Does Visual Spatial Awareness Require the Visual Awareness of Space? Mind and Language 27 (3):308-329.score: 8.0
    Many philosophers have held that it is not possible to experience a spatial object, property, or relation except against the background of an intact awareness of a space that is somehow ‘absolute’. This paper challenges that claim, by analyzing in detail the case of a brain-damaged subject whose visual experiences seem to have violated this condition: spatial objects and properties were present in his visual experience, but space itself was not. I go on to suggest that phenomenological argumentation can give (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Wayne Wu (2013). Visual Spatial Constancy and Modularity: Does Intention Penetrate Vision? Philosophical Studies 165 (2):647-669.score: 8.0
    Is vision informationally encapsulated from cognition or is it cognitively penetrated? I shall argue that intentions penetrate vision in the experience of visual spatial constancy: the world appears to be spatially stable despite our frequent eye movements. I explicate the nature of this experience and critically examine and extend current neurobiological accounts of spatial constancy, emphasizing the central role of motor signals in computing such constancy. I then provide a stringent condition for failure of informational encapsulation that emphasizes a computational (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. René Jagnow (2011). Ambiguous Figures and the Spatial Contents of Perceptual Experience: A Defense of Representationalism. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):325-346.score: 8.0
    Representationalists hold that the phenomenal character of a perceptual experience is identical with, or supervenes on, an aspect of its representational content. As such, representationalism could be disproved by a counter-example consisting of two experiences that have the same representational content but differ in phenomenal character. In this paper, I discuss two recently proposed counter-examples to representationalism that involve ambiguous or reversible figures. I pursue two goals. My first, and most important, goal is to show that the representationalist can offer (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Simon Prosser (2011). Affordances and Phenomenal Character in Spatial Perception. Philosophical Review 120 (4):475-513.score: 8.0
    Intentionalism is the view that the phenomenal character of a conscious experience is wholly determined by, or even reducible to, its representational content. In this essay I put forward a version of intentionalism that allows (though does not require) the reduction of phenomenal character to representational content. Unlike other reductionist theories, however, it does not require the acceptance of phenomenal externalism (the view that phenomenal character does not supervene on the internal state of the subject). According the view offered here, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gary Hatfield (1991). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz. Cambridge: MIT Press.score: 8.0
    Gary Hatfield examines theories of spatial perception from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century and provides a detailed analysis of the works of Kant and...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2010). Reconsidering 'Spatial Memory' and the Morris Water Maze. Synthese 177 (2):261-283.score: 8.0
    The Morris water maze has been put forward in the philosophy of neuroscience as an example of an experimental arrangement that may be used to delineate the cognitive faculty of spatial memory (e.g., Craver and Darden, Theory and method in the neurosciences, University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, 2001; Craver, Explaining the brain: Mechanisms and the mosaic unity of neuroscience, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2007). However, in the experimental and review literature on the water maze throughout the history of its use, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Campbell (1993). The Role of Physical Objects in Spatial Thinking. In Naomi M. Eilan, R. McCarthy & M. W. Brewer (eds.), Problems in the Philosophy and Psychology of Spatial Representation. Blackwell.score: 8.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rick Grush (2007). Skill Theory V2.0: Dispositions, Emulation, and Spatial Perception. Synthese 159 (3):389 - 416.score: 8.0
    An attempt is made to defend a general approach to the spatial content of perception, an approach according to which perception is imbued with spatial content in virtue of certain kinds of connections between perceiving organism's sensory input and its behavioral output. The most important aspect of the defense involves clearly distinguishing two kinds of perceptuo-behavioral skills—the formation of dispositions, and a capacity for emulation. The former, the formation of dispositions, is argued to by the central pivot of spatial content. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ned Markosian (forthcoming). A Spatial Approach to Mereology. In Shieva Keinschmidt (ed.), Mereology and Location. Oxford University Press.score: 8.0
    When do several objects compose a further object? The last twenty years have seen a great deal of discussion of this question. According to the most popular view on the market, there is a physical object composed of your brain and Jeremy Bentham’s body. According to the second-most popular view on the market, there are no such objects as human brains or human bodies, and there are also no atoms, rocks, tables, or stars. And according to the third-ranked view, there (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013). The Δ-Quantum Machine, the K-Model, and the Non-Ordinary Spatiality of Quantum Entities. Foundations of Science 18 (1):11-41.score: 8.0
    The purpose of this article is threefold. Firstly, it aims to present, in an educational and non-technical fashion, the main ideas at the basis of Aerts’ creation-discovery view and hidden measurement approach : a fundamental explanatory framework whose importance, in this author’s view, has been seriously underappreciated by the physics community, despite its success in clarifying many conceptual challenges of quantum physics. Secondly, it aims to introduce a new quantum machine—that we call the δ quantum machine —which is able to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Marjorie Spear Price (2008). Particularism and the Spatial Location of Events. Philosophia 36 (1):129-140.score: 8.0
    According to the Particularist Theory of Events, events are real things that have a spatiotemporal location. I argue that some events do not have a spatial location in the sense required by the theory. These events are ordinary, nonmental events like Smith’s investigating the murder and Carol’s putting her coat on the chair. I discuss the significance of these counterexamples for the theory.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. J. Gregory Trafton, Susan B. Trickett & Farilee E. Mintz (2005). Connecting Internal and External Representations: Spatial Transformations of Scientific Visualizations. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 10 (1):89-106.score: 8.0
    Many scientific discoveries have depended on external diagrams or visualizations. Many scientists also report to use an internal mental representation or mental imagery to help them solve problems and reason. How do scientists connect these internal and external representations? We examined working scientists as they worked on external scientific visualizations. We coded the number and type of spatial transformations (mental operations that scientists used on internal or external representations or images) and found that there were a very large number of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Abraham Olivier (2006). The Spatiality of Pain. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):336-349.score: 8.0
    How far can one ascribe a spatial meaning to pain? When I have a pain, for instance, in my leg, how should one understand the “in” in the “pain in my leg”? I argue (contrary to Noordhof) that pain does have a spatial meaning, but (contrary to Tye) that the spatiality of pain is not to be understood in the standard sense of spatial enclosure. Instead, spatiality has a special meaning with regard to pain. By defining pain in phenomenological terms (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Scott D. Lathrop, Samuel Wintermute & John E. Laird (2011). Exploring the Functional Advantages of Spatial and Visual Cognition From an Architectural Perspective. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):796-818.score: 8.0
    We present a general cognitive architecture that tightly integrates symbolic, spatial, and visual representations. A key means to achieving this integration is allowing cognition to move freely between these modes, using mental imagery. The specific components and their integration are motivated by results from psychology, as well as the need for developing a functional and efficient implementation. We discuss functional benefits that result from the combination of multiple content-based representations and the specialized processing units associated with them. Instantiating this theory, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Craig French (forthcoming). Object Seeing and Spatial Perception. In Fiona MacPherson, Martine Nida-Rümelin & Fabian Dorsch (eds.), Phenomenal Presence.score: 8.0
    I consider the way in which spatial perception is necessary for object seeing. In section 1 I outline the operative conception of object seeing. I consider Cassam’s view that in order to see o, you must see it as spatially located (section 2). I argue that Cassam’s argument is unsound. Cassam’s argument relies on the claim that seeing o requires visual differentiation. But it is not the case that seeing o requires visual differentiation. This is because the following principle is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jairo da Silva (2012). Husserl on Geometry and Spatial Representation. Axiomathes 22 (1):5-30.score: 8.0
    Husserl left many unpublished drafts explaining (or trying to) his views on spatial representation and geometry, such as, particularly, those collected in the second part of Studien zur Arithmetik und Geometrie (Hua XXI), but no completely articulate work on the subject. In this paper, I put forward an interpretation of what those views might have been. Husserl, I claim, distinguished among different conceptions of space, the space of perception (constituted from sensorial data by intentionally motivated psychic functions), that of physical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Richard P. Cooper, Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes (2013). Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes? Cognitive Science 37 (4):605-630.score: 8.0
    Automatic imitation or “imitative compatibility” is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions—body movement topography and relative spatial position. However, it is not yet clear whether these two types of stimulus–response compatibility effect are mediated by the same or different cognitive processes. We present an interactive activation model (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Holger Schultheis & Thomas Barkowsky (2011). Casimir: An Architecture for Mental Spatial Knowledge Processing. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):778-795.score: 8.0
    Mental spatial knowledge processing often uses spatio-analogical or quasipictorial representation structures such as spatial mental models or mental images. The cognitive architecture Casimir is designed to provide a framework for computationally modeling human spatial knowledge processing relying on these kinds of representation formats. In this article, we present an overview of Casimir and its components. We briefly describe the long-term memory component and the interaction with external diagrammatic representations. Particular emphasis is placed on Casimir’s working memory and control mechanisms. Regarding (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Sho Tanaka (2009). Kinematical Reduction of Spatial Degrees of Freedom and Holographic Relation in Yang's Quantized Space-Time Algebra. Foundations of Physics 39 (5):510-518.score: 8.0
    We try to find a possible origin of the holographic principle in the Lorentz-covariant Yang’s quantized space-time algebra (YSTA). YSTA, which is intrinsically equipped with short- and long-scale parameters, λ and R, gives a finite number of spatial degrees of freedom for any bounded spatial region, providing a basis for divergence-free quantum field theory. Furthermore, it gives a definite kinematical reduction of spatial degrees of freedom, compared with the ordinary lattice space. On account of the latter fact, we find a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. A. Alyushin (2012). Depth as an Extra Spatial Dimension and its Implications for Cosmology and Gravity Theory. Axiomathes 22 (4):469-507.score: 8.0
    Abstract I develop the idea that there exists a special dimension of depth, or of scale. The depth dimension is physically real and extends from the bottom micro-level to the ultimate macro-level of the Universe. The depth dimension, or the scales axis, complements the standard three spatial dimensions. I discuss the tentative qualities of the depth dimension and the universal arrangement of matter along this dimension. I suggest that all matter in the Universe, at least in the present cosmological epoch, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Glenn Gunzelmann (2011). Introduction to the Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):628-631.score: 8.0
    Our ability to process spatial information is fundamental for understanding and interacting with the environment, and it pervades other components of cognitive functioning from language to mathematics. Moreover, technological advances have produced new capabilities that have created research opportunities and astonishing applications. In this Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition, research crossing a variety of disciplines and methodologies is described, all focused on developing models to represent the capacities and limitations of human spatial cognition.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Madeleine Keehner (2011). Spatial Cognition Through the Keyhole: How Studying a Real-World Domain Can Inform Basic Science—and Vice Versa. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):632-647.score: 8.0
    This paper discusses spatial cognition in the domain of minimally invasive surgery. It draws on studies from this domain to shed light on a range of spatial cognitive processes and to consider individual differences in performance. In relation to modeling, the aim is to identify potential opportunities for characterizing the complex interplay between perception, action, and cognition, and to consider how theoretical models of the relevant processes might prove valuable for addressing applied questions about surgical performance and training.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Diarmid A. Finnegan (2008). The Spatial Turn: Geographical Approaches in the History of Science. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (2):369 - 388.score: 8.0
    Over the past decade or so a number of historians of science and historical geographers, alert to the situated nature of scientific knowledge production and reception and to the migratory patterns of science on the move, have called for more explicit treatment of the geographies of past scientific knowledge. Closely linked to work in the sociology of scientific knowledge and science studies and connected with a heightened interest in spatiality evident across the humanities and social sciences this 'spatial turn' (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Olivier le Guen (2011). Speech and Gesture in Spatial Language and Cognition Among the Yucatec Mayas. Cognitive Science 35 (5):905-938.score: 8.0
    In previous analyses of the influence of language on cognition, speech has been the main channel examined. In studies conducted among Yucatec Mayas, efforts to determine the preferred frame of reference in use in this community have failed to reach an agreement (Bohnemeyer & Stolz, 2006; Levinson, 2003 vs. Le Guen, 2006, 2009). This paper argues for a multimodal analysis of language that encompasses gesture as well as speech, and shows that the preferred frame of reference in Yucatec Maya is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jairo José Silva (2012). Husserl on Geometry and Spatial Representation. Axiomathes 22 (1):5-30.score: 8.0
    Husserl left many unpublished drafts explaining (or trying to) his views on spatial representation and geometry, such as, particularly, those collected in the second part of Studien zur Arithmetik und Geometrie (Hua XXI), but no completely articulate work on the subject. In this paper, I put forward an interpretation of what those views might have been. Husserl, I claim, distinguished among different conceptions of space, the space of perception (constituted from sensorial data by intentionally motivated psychic functions), that of physical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Soonja Choi & Kate Hattrup (2012). Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization. Cognitive Science 36 (1):102-129.score: 8.0
    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources for categorization, and allocation between the two depended on the target relation and the features contrasted in the choices. Whereas perceptual/cognitive salience for containment and tight-fit features guided categorization in many contexts, language-specific semantics influenced categorization where the two (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Glenn Gunzelmann & Don R. Lyon (2011). Representations and Processes of Human Spatial Competence. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):741-759.score: 8.0
    This article presents an approach to understanding human spatial competence that focuses on the representations and processes of spatial cognition and how they are integrated with cognition more generally. The foundational theoretical argument for this research is that spatial information processing is central to cognition more generally, in the sense that it is brought to bear ubiquitously to improve the adaptivity and effectiveness of perception, cognitive processing, and motor action. We describe research spanning multiple levels of complexity to understand both (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jean M. Mandler (2012). On the Spatial Foundations of the Conceptual System and Its Enrichment. Cognitive Science 36 (3):421-451.score: 8.0
    A theory of how concept formation begins is presented that accounts for conceptual activity in the first year of life, shows how increasing conceptual complexity comes about, and predicts the order in which new types of information accrue to the conceptual system. In a compromise between nativist and empiricist views, it offers a single domain-general mechanism that redescribes attended spatiotemporal information into an iconic form. The outputs of this mechanism consist of types of spatial information that we know infants attend (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Marco Mamone Capria (2011). Spatial Directions, Anisotropy and Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 41 (8):1375-1397.score: 8.0
    The concept of an objective spatial direction in special relativity is investigated and theories assuming light-speed isotropy while accepting the existence of a privileged spatial direction are classified, including so-called very special relativity. A natural generalization of the proper time principle is introduced which makes it possible to devise non-optical experimental tests of spatial isotropy. Several common misunderstandings in the relativistic literature concerning the role of spatial isotropy are clarified.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Chris Lindsay (forthcoming). Reid on Instinctive Exertions and the Spatial Content of Sensations. In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Mind, Knowledge and Action: Essays in Honor of Reid’s Tercentenary.score: 8.0
    In his last great philosophical essay, 'Of Power', Reid makes the plausible claim that 'our first exertions are instinctive' and made 'without any distinct conception of the event that is to follow'. According to Reid, these instinctive exertions allow us to form beliefs about correlations between exertions and consequential events. Such instinctive exertions also explain the origin of our conception of power. In this paper, I argue that we can use the notion of instinctive exertions to address several objections that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Massimo Pauri (2011). Epistemic Primacy Vs. Ontological Elusiveness of Spatial Extension: Is There an Evolutionary Role for the Quantum? Foundations of Physics 41 (11):1677-1702.score: 8.0
    A critical re-examination of the history of the concepts of space (including spacetime of general relativity and relativistic quantum field theory) reveals a basic ontological elusiveness of spatial extension, while, at the same time, highlighting the fact that its epistemic primacy seems to be unavoidably imposed on us (as stated by A.Einstein “giving up the extensional continuum … is like to breathe in airless space”). On the other hand, Planck’s discovery of the atomization of action leads to the fundamental recognition (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jan Degenaar (2014). Through the Inverting Glass: First-Person Observations on Spatial Vision and Imagery. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):373-393.score: 8.0
    Experience with inverting glasses reveals key factors of spatial vision. Interpretations of the literature based on the metaphor of a “visual image” have raised the question whether visual experience with inverting glasses remains inverted or whether it may turn back to normal after adaptation to the glasses. Here, I report on my experience with left/right inverting glasses and argue that a more fine-grained sensorimotor analysis can resolve the issue. Crucially, inverting glasses introduce a conflict at the very heart of spatial (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Stephanie A. Gagnon, Tad T. Brunyé, Aaron Gardony, Matthijs L. Noordzij, Caroline R. Mahoney & Holly A. Taylor (2014). Stepping Into a Map: Initial Heading Direction Influences Spatial Memory Flexibility. Cognitive Science 38 (2):275-302.score: 8.0
    Learning a novel environment involves integrating first-person perceptual and motoric experiences with developing knowledge about the overall structure of the surroundings. The present experiments provide insights into the parallel development of these egocentric and allocentric memories by intentionally conflicting body- and world-centered frames of reference during learning, and measuring outcomes via online and offline measures. Results of two experiments demonstrate faster learning and increased memory flexibility following route perspective reading (Experiment 1) and virtual navigation (Experiment 2) when participants begin exploring (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Bruno Laeng, Matia Okubo, Ayako Saneyoshi & Chikashi Michimata (2011). Processing Spatial Relations With Different Apertures of Attention. Cognitive Science 35 (2):297-329.score: 8.0
    Neuropsychological studies suggest the existence of lateralized networks that represent categorical and coordinate types of spatial information. In addition, studies with neural networks have shown that they encode more effectively categorical spatial judgments or coordinate spatial judgments, if their input is based, respectively, on units with relatively small, nonoverlapping receptive fields, as opposed to units with relatively large, overlapping receptive fields. These findings leave open the question of whether interactive processes between spatial detectors and types of spatial relations can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Michele Burigo & Simona Sacchi (2013). Object Orientation Affects Spatial Language Comprehension. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1471-1492.score: 8.0
    Typical spatial descriptions, such as “The car is in front of the house,” describe the position of a located object (LO; e.g., the car) in space relative to a reference object (RO) whose location is known (e.g., the house). The orientation of the RO affects spatial language comprehension via the reference frame selection process. However, the effects of the LO's orientation on spatial language have not received great attention. This study explores whether the pure geometric information of the LO (e.g., (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kirsten Jacobson (2006). The Interpersonal Expression of Human Spatiality: A Phenomenological Interpretation of Anorexia Nervosa. Chiasmi International 8:157-173.score: 8.0
    This paper extends Merleau-Ponty’s arguments regarding the interpersonal character of human spatiality and Bateson’s conception of the dynamically extended nature of consciousness. The central argument is that human communication is essentially spatial in nature, and that it is experienced and expressed as such. Using this analysis, the paper argues that Anorexia nervosa should not primarily be understood as an eating disorder, but rather as a spatially expressed and felt communication disorder. Moreover, it demonstrates that anorexia is not an illness of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. A. Tanesini (forthcoming). Spatial Attention and Perception: Seeing Without Paint. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-22.score: 8.0
    Covert spatial attention alters the way things look. There is strong empirical evidence showing that objects situated at attended locations are described as appearing bigger, closer, if striped, stripier than qualitatively indiscernible counterparts whose locations are unattended. These results cannot be easily explained in terms of which properties of objects are perceived. Nor do they appear to be cases of visual illusions. Ned Block has argued that these results are best accounted for by invoking what he calls ‘mental paint’. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Laura Carlson, Marjorie Skubic, Jared Miller, Zhiyu Huo & Tatiana Alexenko (2014). Strategies for Human‐Driven Robot Comprehension of Spatial Descriptions by Older Adults in a Robot Fetch Task. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):513-533.score: 8.0
    This contribution presents a corpus of spatial descriptions and describes the development of a human-driven spatial language robot system for their comprehension. The domain of application is an eldercare setting in which an assistive robot is asked to “fetch” an object for an elderly resident based on a natural language spatial description given by the resident. In Part One, we describe a corpus of naturally occurring descriptions elicited from a group of older adults within a virtual 3D home that simulates (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David Moreau (forthcoming). Unreflective Actions? Complex Motor Skill Acquisition to Enhance Spatial Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-11.score: 8.0
    Cognitive science has recently moved toward action-integrated paradigms to account for some of its most remarkable findings. This novel approach has opened up new venues for the sport sciences. In particular, a large body of literature has investigated the relationship between complex motor practice and cognition, which in the sports domain has mostly concerned the effect of imagery and other forms of mental practice on motor skill acquisition and emotional control. Yet recent evidence indicates that this relationship is bidirectional: motor (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Roger Newport Rachel J. Scriven (2013). Spatial Compression Impairs Prism Adaptation in Healthy Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 8.0
    Neglect patients typically present with gross inattention to one side of space following damage to the contralateral hemisphere. While prism-adaptation is effective in ameliorating some neglect behaviours, the mechanisms involved and their relationship to neglect remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that conscious strategic control processes in prism-adaptation may be impaired in neglect patients, who are also reported to show extraordinarily long aftereffects compared to healthy participants. Determining the underlying cause of these effects may be the key to understanding therapeutic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Aude Oliva Timothy F. Brady (2012). Spatial Frequency Integration During Active Perception: Perceptual Hysteresis When an Object Recedes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 8.0
    As we move through the world, information about objects moves to different spatial frequencies. How the visual system successfully integrates information across these changes to form a coherent percept is thus an important open question. Here we investigate such integration using hybrid faces, which contain different images in low and high spatial frequencies. Observers judged how similar a hybrid was to each of its component images while walking towards or away from it or having the stimulus moved towards or away (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. J. Gregory Trafton & Anthony M. Harrison (2011). Embodied Spatial Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):686-706.score: 8.0
    We present a spatial system called Specialized Egocentrically Coordinated Spaces embedded in an embodied cognitive architecture (ACT-R Embodied). We show how the spatial system works by modeling two different developmental findings: gaze-following and Level 1 perspective taking. The gaze-following model is based on an experiment by Corkum and Moore (1998), whereas the Level 1 visual perspective-taking model is based on an experiment by Moll and Tomasello (2006). The models run on an embodied robotic system.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000