Search results for 'Special relativity (Physics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Richard Schlegel (1975). Superposition in Quantum and Relativity Physics—An Interaction Interpretation of Special Relativity Theory: Part III. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 5 (2):197-215.
    With the interaction interpretation, the Lorentz transformation of a system arises with selection from a superposition of its states in an observation-interaction. Integration of momentum states of a mass over all possible velocities gives the rest-mass energy. Static electrical and magnetic fields are not found to form such a superposition and are to be taken as irreducible elements. The external superposition consists of those states that are reached only by change of state of motion, whereas the internal superposition contains all (...)
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  2. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent (...)
     
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  3. Antony Eagle, Can We Read Metaphysics Off Physics? Or, What Presentists Should Say About Special Relativity.
    Metaphysics, having long since recovered the logical positivist/empiricist objections that were supposed to signal its death, is once again coming under sustained criticism, and from a similar direction. Once it was realised that speculative systematic metaphysics needn’t be abandoned in light of empiricist scruples, metaphysics flourished. But it’s become increasingly clear that, even if the logical empiricists didn’t exactly get their objections right, there is something worrying about the evidential basis for contemporary metaphysics. Not that metaphysicians are unaware of this. (...)
     
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  4.  3
    P. T. Landsberg (1972). Time in Statistical Physics and Special Relativity. In J. T. Fraser, F. Haber & G. Muller (eds.), The Study of Time. Springer-Verlag 59--109.
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  5.  23
    Albert Shadowitz (1968). Special Relativity. Philadelphia, Saunders Co..
    The first completely geometric approach to relativity theory, based on the space-time geometries of Loedel and Brehme.
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  6. Nicholas Maxwell (1985). Are Probabilism and Special Relativity Incompatible? Philosophy of Science 52 (1):23-43.
    In this paper I expound an argument which seems to establish that probabilism and special relativity are incompatible. I examine the argument critically, and consider its implications for interpretative problems of quantum theory, and for theoretical physics as a whole.
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  7.  22
    A. P. French (1968). Special Relativity. New York, Norton.
    The book opens with a description of the smooth transition from Newtonian to Einsteinian behaviour from electrons as their energy is progressively increased, ...
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  8. N. David Mermin (1968). Space and Time in Special Relativity. New York, Mcgraw-Hill.
  9. Robert Resnick (1968). Introduction to Special Relativity. New York, Wiley.
  10. Francis R. Halpern (1968). Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
  11. G. Stephenson (1958). Special Relativity for Physicists. New York, Longmans, Green.
     
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  12. O. Costa de Beauregard (1966). Précis of Special Relativity. New York, Academic Press.
     
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  13. E. A. Guggenheim (1967). Elements and Formulae of Special Relativity. New York, Pergamon Press.
     
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  14. Tim Budden (1996). Geometry, Symmetry and Locality in the Philosophy of Special Relativity.
     
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  15.  24
    David Bohm (1965). The Special Theory of Relativity. New York, W.A. Benjamin.
    With clarity and grace, he also reveals the limited truth of some of the "common sense" assumptions which make it difficult for us to appreciate its full ...
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  16.  33
    Márton Gömöri & László E. Szabó (2013). Formal Statement of the Special Principle of Relativity. Synthese 192 (7):1-24.
    While there is a longstanding discussion about the interpretation of the extended, general principle of relativity, there seems to be a consensus that the special principle of relativity is absolutely clear and unproblematic. However, a closer look at the literature on relativistic physics reveals a more confusing picture. There is a huge variety of, sometimes metaphoric, formulations of the relativity principle, and there are different, sometimes controversial, views on its actual content. The aim of this paper (...)
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  17.  99
    Jerrold Franklin (2013). Rigid Body Motion in Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 43 (12):1489-1501.
    We study the acceleration and collisions of rigid bodies in special relativity. After a brief historical review, we give a physical definition of the term ‘rigid body’ in relativistic straight line motion. We show that the definition of ‘rigid body’ in relativity differs from the usual classical definition, so there is no difficulty in dealing with rigid bodies in relativistic motion. We then describe The motion of a rigid body undergoing constant acceleration to a given velocity.The acceleration (...)
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  18.  86
    Kinjalk Lochan, Seema Satin & Tejinder P. Singh (2012). Statistical Thermodynamics for a Non-Commutative Special Relativity: Emergence of a Generalized Quantum Dynamics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 42 (12):1556-1572.
    There ought to exist a description of quantum field theory which does not depend on an external classical time. To achieve this goal, in a recent paper we have proposed a non-commutative special relativity in which space-time and matter degrees of freedom are treated as classical matrices with arbitrary commutation relations, and a space-time line element is defined using a trace. In the present paper, following the theory of Trace Dynamics, we construct a statistical thermodynamics for the non-commutative (...)
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  19.  50
    Guido Rizzi, Matteo Luca Ruggiero & Alessio Serafini (2004). Synchronization Gauges and the Principles of Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 34 (12):1835-1887.
    The axiomatic bases of Special Relativity Theory (SRT) are thoroughly re-examined from an operational point of view, with particular emphasis on the status of Einstein synchronization in the light of the possibility of arbitrary synchronization procedures in inertial reference frames. Once correctly and explicitly phrased, the principles of SRT allow for a wide range of “theories” that differ from the standard SRT only for the difference in the chosen synchronization procedures, but are wholly equivalent to SRT in predicting (...)
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  20.  37
    Vasco Guerra & Rodrigo de Abreu (2006). On the Consistency Between the Assumption of a Special System of Reference and Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 36 (12):1826-1845.
    In a previous work, we have shown that the null result of the Michelson–Morley experiment in vacuum is deeply connected with the notion of time. The same is true for the postulate of constancy of the two-way speed of light in vacuum in all frames independently of the state of motion of the emitting body. The argumentation formerly given is very general and has to be true not only within Special Relativity and its “equivalence” of all inertial frames, (...)
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  21.  25
    Or Sela, Boaz Tamir, Shahar Dolev & Avshalom C. Elitzur (2009). Can Special Relativity Be Derived From Galilean Mechanics Alone? Foundations of Physics 39 (5):499-509.
    Special relativity is based on the apparent contradiction between two postulates, namely, Galilean vs. c-invariance. We show that anomalies ensue by holding the former postulate alone. In order for Galilean invariance to be consistent, it must hold not only for bodies’ motions, but also for the signals and forces they exchange. If the latter ones do not obey the Galilean version of the Velocities Addition Law, invariance is violated. If, however, they do, causal anomalies, information loss and conservation (...)
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  22.  28
    Alon Drory (2013). Special Relativity Cannot Be Derived From Galilean Mechanics Alone. Foundations of Physics 43 (5):665-684.
    A recent paper suggested that if Galilean covariance was extended to signals and interactions, the resulting theory would contain such anomalies as would have impelled physicists towards special relativity even without empirical prompts. I analyze this claim. Some so-called anomalies turn out to be errors. Others have classical analogs, which suggests that classical physicists would not have viewed them as anomalous. Still others, finally, remain intact in special relativity, so that they serve as no impetus towards (...)
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  23.  22
    Marco Mamone Capria (2011). Spatial Directions, Anisotropy and Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 41 (8):1375-1397.
    The concept of an objective spatial direction in special relativity is investigated and theories assuming light-speed isotropy while accepting the existence of a privileged spatial direction are classified, including so-called very special relativity. A natural generalization of the proper time principle is introduced which makes it possible to devise non-optical experimental tests of spatial isotropy. Several common misunderstandings in the relativistic literature concerning the role of spatial isotropy are clarified.
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  24.  16
    B. G. Sidharth (2008). The Limits of Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 38 (8):695-706.
    The Special Theory of Relativity and the Theory of the Electron have had an interesting history together. Originally the electron was studied in a non-relativistic context and this opened up the interesting possibility that lead to the conclusion that the mass of the electron could be thought of entirely in electromagnetic terms without introducing inertial considerations. However the application of Special Relativity lead to several problems, both for an extended electron and the point electron. These inconsistencies (...)
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  25.  11
    Petr Jizba & Fabio Scardigli (2014). Space-Time Grains: Roots of Special and Doubly Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 44 (5):512-522.
    We show that the special relativistic dynamics when combined with quantum mechanics and the concept of superstatistics can be interpreted as arising from two interlocked non-relativistic stochastic processes that operate at different energy scales. This interpretation leads to Feynman amplitudes that are in the Euclidean regime identical to transition probability of a Brownian particle propagating through a granular space. Some kind of spacetime granularity could be therefore held responsible for the emergence at larger scales of various symmetries. For illustration (...)
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  26.  20
    Günter Nimtz (2011). Tunneling Confronts Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 41 (7):1193-1199.
    Experiments with evanescent modes and tunneling particles have shown that (i) their signal velocity may be faster than light, (ii) they are described by virtual particles, (iii) they are nonlocal and act at a distance, (iv) experimental tunneling data of phonons, photons, and electrons display a universal scattering time at the tunneling barrier front, and (v) the properties of evanescent, i.e. tunneling modes are not compatible with the special theory of relativity.
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  27. M. Carmeli (1995). Cosmological Relativity: A Special Relativity for Cosmology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 25 (7):1029-1040.
    Under the assumption that Hubble's constant H0 is constant in cosmic time, there is an analogy between the equation of propagation of light and that of expansion of the universe. Using this analogy, and assuming that the laws of physics are the same at all cosmic times, a new special relativity, a cosmological relativity, is developed. As a result, a transformation is obtained that relates physical quantities at different cosmic times. In a one-dimensional motion, the new transformation (...)
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  28.  49
    Alexander Gersten (2003). Euclidean Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 33 (8):1237-1251.
    New four coordinates are introduced which are related to the usual space-time coordinates. For these coordinates, the Euclidean four-dimensional length squared is equal to the interval squared of the Minkowski space. The Lorentz transformation, for the new coordinates, becomes an SO(4) rotation. New scalars (invariants) are derived. A second approach to the Lorentz transformation is presented. A mixed space is generated by interchanging the notion of time and proper time in inertial frames. Within this approach the Lorentz transformation is a (...)
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  29.  88
    Michel Janssen (2009). Drawing the Line Between Kinematics and Dynamics in Special Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (1):26-52.
    In his book, Physical Relativity, Harvey Brown challenges the orthodox view that special relativity is preferable to those parts of Lorentz's classical ether theory it replaced because it revealed various phenomena that were given a dynamical explanation in Lorentz's theory to be purely kinematical. I want to defend this orthodoxy. The phenomena most commonly discussed in this context in the philosophical literature are length contraction and time dilation. I consider three other phenomena of this kind that played (...)
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  30.  18
    Rinat M. Nugayev (1988). Special Relativity as a Stage in the Development of Quantum Theory: A New Outlook of Scientific Revolution. Historia Scientiarum (34):57-79.
    To comprehend the special relativity genesis, one should unfold Einstein’s activities in quantum theory first . His victory upon Lorentz’s approach can only be understood in the wider context of a general programme of unification of classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics, with relativity and quantum theory being merely its subprogrammes. Because of the lack of quantum facets in Lorentz’s theory, Einstein’s programme, which seems to surpass the Lorentz’s one, was widely accepted as soon as quantum theory became (...)
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  31. Nicholas Maxwell (2006). Special Relativity, Time, Probabilism, and Ultimate Reality. In D. Dieks (ed.), The Ontology of Spacetime. Elsevier, B. V
    McTaggart distinguished two conceptions of time: the A-series, according to which events are either past, present or future; and the B-series, according to which events are merely earlier or later than other events. Elsewhere, I have argued that these two views, ostensibly about the nature of time, need to be reinterpreted as two views about the nature of the universe. According to the so-called A-theory, the universe is three dimensional, with a past and future; according to the B-theory, the universe (...)
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  32.  7
    M. P. Seevinck, Can Quantum Theory and Special Relativity Peacefully Coexist?
    This white paper aims to identify an open problem in 'Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality' -namely whether quantum theory and special relativity are formally compatible-, to indicate what the underlying issues are, and put forward ideas about how the problem might be addressed.
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  33.  98
    Joshua M. Mozersky (2000). Time, Tense and Special Relativity. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):221 – 236.
    In this essay I address the issue of whether Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity counts against a tensed or "A-series" understanding of time. Though this debate is an old one, it continues to be lively with many prominent authors recently arguing that a genuine A-series is compatible with a relativistic world view. My aim in what follows is to outline why Special Relativity is thought to count against a tensed understanding of time and then to address (...)
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  34.  79
    Harvey R. Brown & Christopher G. Timpson, Why Special Relativity Should Not Be a Template for a Fundamental Reformulation of Quantum Mechanics.
    In a comparison of the principles of special relativity and of quantum mechanics, the former theory is marked by its relative economy and apparent explanatory simplicity. A number of theorists have thus been led to search for a small number of postulates - essentially information theoretic in nature - that would play the role in quantum mechanics that the relativity principle and the light postulate jointly play in Einstein's 1905 special relativity theory. The purpose of (...)
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  35.  25
    A. Baltas & K. Gavroglu (1980). A Modification of Popper's Tetradic Schema and the Special Relativity Theory. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 11 (2):213-237.
    Summary The present paper constitutes an elaboration of a previous work by one of us which, among other things, proposed some modifications of Popper's tetradic schema. Here, in the first part, we consider critically and develop further these modifications and elaborate on methods which prove more satisfactory for the mapping of the problem solving processes in Physics. We also find the opportunity to make some comments on Physics and on its relation to Mathematics. In the second part, there is an (...)
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  36. C. G., G. R. & H. J. (1998). Predicting the Motion of Particles in Newtonian Mechanics and Special Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 29 (1):81-122.
    This paper and its predecessor () are about the question: 'Are the events in the entire universe encoded in and predictable from any of its parts?' To approach a positive answer in classical physics, the following result is proved and commented on: in Newton's theory of gravitation, the entire trajectory of a particle can be predicted given any segment of it, regardless of how the other particles are moving-provided that there is only a finite number of particles and that their (...)
     
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  37. Domenico Giulini (2005). Special Relativity, a First Encounter: 100 Years Since Einstein. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Special relativity provides the foundations of our knowledge of space and time. Without it, our understanding of the world, and its place in the universe, would be unthinkable. This book gives a concise, elementary, yet exceptionally modern, introduction to special relativity. It is a gentle yet serious 'first encounter', in that it conveys a true understanding rather than purely reports the basic facts. Only very elementary mathematical knowledge is needed to master it, yet it will leave (...)
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  38. S. J. Prokhovnik (1967). The Logic of Special Relativity. London, Cambridge U.P..
     
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  39. Wolfgang Rindler (1966). Special Relativity. New York, Interscience.
  40. James H. Smith (1965). Introduction to Special Relativity. New York, W.A. Benjamin.
  41. T. M. Helliwell (1966). Introduction to Special Relativity. Boston, Allyn and Bacon.
     
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  42.  53
    Jerrold Franklin (2010). Lorentz Contraction, Bell’s Spaceships and Rigid Body Motion in Special Relativity. European Journal of Physics 31:291-298.
    The meaning of Lorentz contraction in special relativity and its connection with Bell’s spaceships parable is discussed. The motion of Bell’s spaceships is then compared with the accelerated motion of a rigid body. We have tried to write this in a simple form that could be used to correct students’ misconceptions due to conflicting earlier treatments.
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  43.  8
    Boris Khots & Dmitriy Khots (2015). Lagrangian in Classical Mechanics and in Special Relativity From Observer’s Mathematics Point of View. Foundations of Physics 45 (7):820-826.
    This work considers the Lagrangian in classical mechanics and in special relativity in a setting of arithmetic, algebra, and topology provided by observer’s mathematics. Certain results and communications pertaining to solutions of these problems are provided. In particular, we show that the standard expressions for Lagrangian take place with probabilities \1.
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  44.  32
    Albert Einstein (1961). Relativity: The Special and the General Theory; a Popular Exposition. New York, Crown Publishers.
    Two leaves of typescript and 7 leaves of galley proofs with corrections in Einstein's hand for the article "Relativity" in American Peoples Encyclopedia.
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  45. John Norton, Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity and the Problems in the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies That Led Him to It.
    Modern readers turning to Einstein’s famous 1905 paper on special relativity may not find what they expect. Its title, “On the electrodynamics of moving bodies,” gives no inkling that it will develop an account of space and time that will topple Newton’s system. Even its first paragraph just calls to mind an elementary experimental result due to Faraday concerning the interaction of a magnet and conductor. Only then does Einstein get down to the business of space and time (...)
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  46.  11
    Susan G. Sterrett, Sounds Like Light: Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity and Mach's Work in Acoustics and Aerodynamics.
    Ernst Mach is the only person whom Einstein included on both the list of physicists he considered his true precursors, and the list of the philosophers who had most affected him. Einstein scholars have been less generous in their estimation of Mach's contributions to Einstein's work, and even amongst the more generous of them, Mach's great achievements in physics are seldom mentioned in this context. This is odd, considering Mach was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics three times. In (...)
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  47.  6
    Albert Einstein (2002). Relativity: The Special and General Theory. Routledge.
    Relativity is the most important scientific idea of the twentieth century. Albert Einstein is the unquestioned founder of modern physics. His Special and General theories of Relativity introduced the idea to the world. In this classic short book he explains clearly, using the minimum amount of mathematical terms, the basic ideas and principles of his theory of Relativity. Unsurpassed by any subsequent books on Relativity, this remains the most popular and useful exposition of Einstein's immense (...)
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  48. J. L. Synge (1965). Relativity: The Special Theory. Interscience Publishers, New York,].
     
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  49.  95
    M. Carmeli (1996). Cosmological Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 26 (3):413-416.
    Recently we presented a new special relativity theory for cosmology in which it was assumed that gravitation can be neglected and thus the bubble constant can be taken as a constant. The theory was presented in a six-dimensional hvperspace. three for the ordinary space and three for the velocities. In this paper we reduce our hyperspace to four dimensions by assuming that the three-dimensional space expands only radially, thus one is left with the three dimensions of ordinary space (...)
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  50. J. Aharoni (1965). The Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford, Clarendon Press.
     
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