Search results for 'Species Differences' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    Gary B. Glavin & George P. Vincent (1979). Species Differences in Restraint-Induced Gastric Ulcers. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 14 (5):351-352.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  2
    James W. Kalat (1987). Species Differences in Intelligence: Which Null Hypothesis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):671.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    A. W. Logue (1981). Species Differences and Principles of Learning: Informed Generality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):150.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Jon H. Kaas (1988). Determining Species Differences in Numbers of Cortical Areas and Modules: The Architectonic Method Needs Supplementation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):96.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Neil Rowland (1979). Natural Drinking, Interactions with Feeding, and Species Differences - Three Data Deserts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):117-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Gerald E. Schneider (1984). Axon Development and Plasticity: Clues From Species Differences and Suggestions for Mechanisms of Evolutionary Change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):346.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  4
    David Lubinski & Travis Thompson (1993). Species and Individual Differences in Communication Based on Private States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):627.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  8.  2
    Guy Madison (2009). Human Female Exogamy is Supported by Cross-Species Comparisons: Cause to Recognise Sex Differences in Societal Policy? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):400-400.
    A sex difference in the tendency to outbreed (female exogamy) is a premise for the target article's proposed framework, which receives some support by being shared with chimpanzees but not with more distantly related primates. Further empirical support is provided, and it is suggested that recognition of sex differences might improve effective fairness, taking sexual assault as a case in point.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Bernard J. Baars (2001). There Are No Known Differences in Brain Mechanisms of Consciousness Between Humans and Other Mammals. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:31- 40.
  10. Massimo Pigliucci (2003). Species as Family Resemblance Concepts: The (Dis-)Solution of the Species Problem? Bioessays 25 (6):596-602.
    The so-called ‘‘species problem’’ has plagued evolution- ary biology since before Darwin’s publication of the aptly titled Origin of Species. Many biologists think the problem is just a matter of semantics; others complain that it will not be solved until we have more empirical data. Yet, we don’t seem to be able to escape discussing it and teaching seminars about it. In this paper, I briefly examine the main themes of the biological and philosophical liter- atures (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  11.  9
    Euan M. Macphail (1987). The Comparative Psychology of Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):645.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   150 citations  
  12.  22
    Hans-Otto Karnath, Susanne Ferber & Marc Himmelbach (2001). Spatial Awareness is a Function of the Temporal Not the Posterior Parietal Lobe. Nature 411 (6840):951-953.
  13. B. Bermond (2001). A Neuropsychological and Evolutionary Approach to Animal Consciousness and Animal Suffering. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:47- 62.
  14.  24
    John C. Marshall, Gereon R. Fink, Peter W. Halligan & Giuseppe Vallar (2002). Spatial Awareness: A Function of the Posterior Parietal Lobe? Cortex 38 (2):253-257.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  63
    S. Kuczaj, K. Tranel, M. Trone & H. Hamner Hill (2001). Are Animals Capable of Deception or Empathy? Implications for Animal Consciousness and Animal Welfare. Animal Welfare. Special Issue 10:161- 173.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  22
    Lawrence Weiskrantz (2001). Commentary Responses and Conscious Awareness in Humans: The Implications for Awareness in Non-Human Animals. Animal Welfare. Special Issue 10:41- 46.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  26
    John G. Taylor (2001). What Do Neuronal Network Models of the Mind Indicate About Animal Consciousness? Animal Welfare Supplement 10:63- 75.
  18.  13
    B. M. Spruijt (2001). How the Hierarchical Organization of the Brain and Increasing Cognitive Abilities May Result in Consciousness. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:77- 87.
  19.  4
    Adrian Mitchell Currie (forthcoming). The Mystery of the Triceratops’s Mother: How to Be a Realist About the Species Category. Erkenntnis:1-22.
    Can we be realists about a general category but pluralists about concepts relating to that category? I argue that paleobiological methods of delineating species are not affected by differing species concepts, and that this underwrites an argument that species concept pluralists should be species category realists. First, the criteria by which paleobiologists delineate species are ‘indifferent’ to the species category. That is, their method for identifying species applies equally to any species concept. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. David B. Dillard-Wright (2009). Thinking Across Species Boundaries: General Sociality and Embodied Meaning. Society and Animals 17 (1):53-71.
    Denying special traits like the use of language to nonhuman animals has often been a basis for the creation of a stand-alone human sphere, apart from and above the animal world and the environmental milieu. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology shows that human communication arises from the semiosis in the extra-human world and is not self-contained. Given many recent insights in scientific studies of nonhuman animals, only a few of which are cited here, it becomes impossible to say that animals are mute, reactive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  13
    David C. Geary (1998). Sexual Selection, the Division of Labor, and the Evolution of Sex Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):444-447.
    Sexual selection traditionally involves male-male competition and female choice, but in some species, including humans, sexual selection can also involve female-female competition and male choice. The degree to which one aspect of sexual selection or another is manifest in human populations will be influenced by a host of social and ecological variables, including the operational sex ratio. These variables are discussed in connection with the relative contribution of sexual selection and the division of labor to the evolution of human (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  28
    Julio A. Camargo (2008). Revisiting the Relation Between Species Diversity and Information Theory. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4):275-283.
    The Shannon information function (H) has been extensively used in ecology as a statistic of species diversity. Yet, the use of Shannon diversity index has also been criticized, mainly because of its ambiguous ecological interpretation and because of its relatively great sensitivity to the relative abundances of species in the community. In my opinion, the major shortcoming of the traditional perspective (on the possible relation of species diversity with information theory) is that species need for an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  3
    David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy (1997). A Dialogue on Species-Specific Rights: Humans and Animals in Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):435.
    At the end of the most violent century in human history, it is good to take stock of our commitments to human and other life forms, as well as to examine the rights and the duties that might flow from their biological makeup. Professor Thomasma and Professor Loewy have held a long-standing dialogue on whether there are moral differences between animals and humans. This dialogue was occasioned by a presentation Thomasma made some years ago at Loewy's invitation at the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  5
    Bobbi S. Low (1994). Human Sex Differences in Behavioral Ecological Perspective. Analyse & Kritik 16 (1):38-67.
    Behavioral ecology, based in the theory of natural selection, predicts that certain behaviors are likely to differ consistently between the sexes in humans as well as other species: aggression, resource striving, information content of sexual signalling. These differences, though of course open to modification by cultural practice, arise because male and female humans, like males and females of other mammal species, typically optimize their reproductive lifetimes through different behaviors: males specializing in mating effort , and females in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  14
    Sarah F. Brosnan & Frans B. M. de Waal (2005). A Cross-Species Perspective on the Selfishness Axiom. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):818-818.
    Henrich et al. describe an innovative research program investigating cross-cultural differences in the selfishness axiom (in economic games) in humans, yet humans are not the only species to show such variation. Chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys show signs of deviating from the standard self-interest paradigm in experimental settings by refusing to take foods that are less valuable than those earned by conspecifics, indicating that they, too, may pay attention to relative gains. However, it is less clear whether these (...) also show the other-regarding preferences seen in humans. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  10
    Bruno Faivre & Pierre M. Auger (1993). Competition and Predation Models Applied to the Case of the Sibling Birds Species Ofhippolais in Burgundy. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (1-2):23-33.
    We study the case of two sibling species ofHippolais(Aves). Very little differences can be observed in the morphology of both species. The breeding area of these species are complementary. Roughly, one species breeds North and East of Europe (Hippolais icterina) while the other breeds South and West of Europe (Hippolais polyglotta). There exitst a narrow zone of sympatry passing through Burgundy. Since several years, it has been observed that this area of sympatry was moving in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  6
    Hans-Rolf Gregorius (2011). The Analysis of Association Between Traits When Differences Between Trait States Matter. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (3):213-229.
    Because of their elementary significance in almost all fields of science, measures of association between two variables or traits are abundant and multiform. One aspect of association that is of considerable interest, especially in population genetics and ecology, seems to be widely ignored. This aspect concerns association between complex traits that show variable and arbitrarily defined state differences. Among such traits are genetic characters controlled by many and potentially polyploid loci, species characteristics, and environmental variables, all of which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  4
    Stephen Jay Gould (1968). Trigonia and the Origin of Species. Journal of the History of Biology 1 (1):41 - 56.
    While the Trigonia story is a microcosmic representation of nineteenth-century evolutionary debates, it also serves as a model for assessing the impact of new empirical material upon a controversial issue potentially explained by several internally consistent but contradictory theories; for there can be no fact quite so pristine as a discovery anticipated by no one. The reaction to modern trigonians was, I suspect, completely typical; all parties to the dispute managed to incorporate the new datum into their systems. Evolutionists emphasized (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  3
    Popko P. Molen (1979). The Ethology of Inter-Individual Differences. Acta Biotheoretica 28 (2).
    In recent times psychologists have shown a growing interest in ethological methods of data collection. At the same time ethologists are showing a growing interest in the methods of data processing as developed in personality psychology. These methods of data processing appear to be most useful to ethological research when investigating differences between individuals. Using factor analysis of aggressive behaviour as an example, it is argued that an ethological approach which focusses on individual differences may add substantial information (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  25
    Nicolas Delon (2012). Handicap et animaux. In Sandra Laugier (ed.), Tous vulnérables ? Le care, les animaux et l'environnement. Payot-Rivages 99-121.
    This paper addresses issues in comparing nonhuman animals and severely disabled human beings in terms of their morally relevant characteristics. Through a discussion of the works of Jeff McMahan, Eva Feder Kittay and Martha Nussbaum, the paper offers a defense of the importance and possibility of extending care and compassion to nonhumans without collapsing relevant species differences.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Michèle N. Schubiger, Florian L. Wüstholz, André Wunder & Judith M. Burkart (2015). High Emotional Reactivity Toward an Experimenter Affects Participation, but Not Performance, in Cognitive Tests with Common Marmosets. Animal Cognition 18 (3):701-712.
    When testing primates with cognitive tasks, it is usually not considered that subjects differ markedly in terms of emotional reactivity toward the experimenter, which potentially affects a subject’s cognitive performance. We addressed this issue in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a monkey species in which males tend to show stronger emotional reactivity in testing situations, whereas females have been reported to outperform males in cognitive tasks. In a two-phase experiment, we first quantified the emotional reactivity of 14 subjects toward four (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. William Bechtel (2009). Generalization and Discovery by Assuming Conserved Mechanisms: Cross‐Species Research on Circadian Oscillators. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):762-773.
    In many domains of biology, explanation takes the form of characterizing the mechanism responsible for a particular phenomenon in a specific biological system. How are such explanations generalized? One important strategy assumes conservation of mechanisms through evolutionary descent. But conservation is seldom complete. In the case discussed, the central mechanism for circadian rhythms in animals was first identified in Drosophila and then extended to mammals. Scientists' working assumption that the clock mechanisms would be conserved both yielded important generalizations and served (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  33.  53
    John Dupré (2004). Human Kinds and Biological Kinds: Some Similarities and Differences. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):892-900.
    This paper compares human diversity with biological diversity generally. Drawing on the pluralistic perspective on biological species defended in earlier work (2002, chs. 3 and 4), I argue that there are useful parallels to be drawn between human and animal kinds, as there are between their respective sources in cultural evolution and evolution generally. This view is developed in opposition to the insistence by sociobiologists and their successors on minimizing the significance of culture. The paper concludes with a discussion (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  3
    Joyce F. Benenson (2009). Dominating Versus Eliminating the Competition: Sex Differences in Human Intrasexual Aggression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):268-269.
    Archer presents a traditional view of intrasexual competition. Knowledge of a species' social structure provides a more complete picture. Human males compete against individuals with whom they may cooperate later in inter-group aggression. By contrast, females compete against individuals for a mate's continued support. Females' aggression may aim at eliminating the competition, whereas males simply may attempt to dominate others.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Peter J. Whitehouse (1997). Readdressing Our Moral Relationship to Nonhuman Creatures: Commentary on “A Dialogue on Species-Specific Rights: Humans and Animals in Bioethics”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):445.
    Community discourse about the moral status of animals is critical to the future of bioethics and, indeed, to the future of modern society. Thomasma and Loewy are to be commended for sharing thoughts and trying to attain some common ground. I am grateful to them for fostering discussion and allowing me to respond. I cannot endorse the negative tone of the end of their conversation, however. They end with serious concerns about the possibility of any agreement between themselves. Even though (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  19
    Jerome H. Barkow (2000). Our Shared Species-Typical Evolutionary Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):148-148.
    Because human cultures are far more similar than they are different, culturally constituted niches may work to limit or prevent the development of genetically based psychological differences across populations. The niche approach further implies that we may remain relatively well-adapted to contemporary environments because of the latter's cultural niche continuity with ancient environments.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  11
    Mary Lee A. Jensvold, Jacquelyn C. Buckner & Gina B. Stadtner (2010). Caregiver–Chimpanzee Interactions with Species-Specific Behaviors. Interaction Studies 11 (3):396-409.
    The relationships between captive primates and their caregivers are critical ones and can affect animal welfare. This study tested the effect of caregivers using chimpanzee behaviors or not, in daily interactions with captive chimpanzees. In the Chimpanzee Behavior condition the caregiver presented chimpanzee behaviors. In the Human Behavior condition the caregiver avoided using chimpanzee behaviors. The chimpanzees had individual patterns of response and had significant differences in their responses to each condition. These data are compared to a similar study (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  3
    Douglas C. Broadfield (2005). Do Asymmetrical Differences in Primate Brains Correspond to Cerebral Lateralization? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):590-591.
    An evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) may apply to characters expressed across species for predation and feeding, because these characters are conservative. However, the evolution of complex, polymorphic behaviors is more difficult to define as an ESS. Lateralization may be selective for certain simple traits, but lateralization of complex traits is likely the result of coadaptation of otherwise non-lateralized features.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  4
    Cheryl A. Logan (2001). "[A]Re Norway Rats... Things?": Diversity Versus Generality in the Use of Albino Rats in Experiments on Development and Sexuality. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (2):287 - 314.
    In America by the 1930s, albino rats had become a kind of generic standard in research on physiology and behavior that de-emphasized diversity across species. However, prior to about 1915, the early work of many of the pioneer rat researchers in America and in central Europe reflected a strong interest in species differences and a deep regard for diversity. These scientists sought broad, often medical, generality, but their quest for generality using a standard animal did not entail (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  40. Albert Mosley, Expanding the Moral Circle: From Racism to Speciesism.
    This paper reviews the argument by Peter Singer that speciesism, the exploitation of other species without regard for their interests, is as morally objectionable as racism and sexism. Objections to this argument by philosophers such as Peter Carruthers, Mary Midgley, and Cora Diamond as well as conventional wisdom about notions of species differences are presented and critically examined. I conclude that Alaine Locke would have supported Singer's expansion of the moral circle.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  15
    Paul Wennekes, James Rosindell & Rampal Etienne (2012). The Neutral—Niche Debate: A Philosophical Perspective. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (3):257-271.
    Ecological communities around the world are under threat while a consensus theory of community structure remains elusive. In the last decade ecologists have struggled with two seemingly opposing theories: niche-based theory that explains diversity with speciesdifferences and the neutral theory of biodiversity that claims that much of the diversity we observe can be explained without explicitly invoking speciesdifferences. Although ecologists are increasingly attempting to reconcile these two theories, there is still much resistance against the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  17
    Gordon G. Gallup (1998). Mirrors and Radical Behaviorism: Reflections on C. M. Heyes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):119-119.
    Heyes's attempt to reinterpret research on primate cognition from the standpoint of radical behaviorism is strong on dialogue and debate but weak on evidence. Recent evidence concerning self-recognition, for example, shows that her arguments about differential recovery from anesthetization and species differences in face touching as alternative accounts of the behavior of primates in the presence of mirrors) are invalid.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  4
    Kara White (2013). And Say the Cat Responded? Getting Closer to the Feline Gaze. Society and Animals 21 (1):93-104.
    Within the field of multispecies ethnography, a lingering question remains regarding how we can understand the nonhuman side of the human–nonhuman encounter. Many authors have ventured into this topic on a theoretical level, but none have proposed an effective methodological approach for how to achieve their goals. After examining the pitfalls experienced when acting as a volunteer at an animal shelter, I propose that in order to get closer to the feline gaze, we must first utilize an understanding of a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  12
    Antonino Raffone & Gary L. Brase (2006). The Key Role of Prefrontal Cortex Structure and Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):22-22.
    The tension between focusing on species similarities versus species differences (phylogenetic versus adaptationist approaches) recurs in discussions about the nature of neural connectivity and organization following brain expansion. Whereas Striedter suggests a primary role for response inhibition, other possibilities include dense recurrent connectivity loops. Computer simulations and brain imaging technologies are crucial in better understanding actual neuronal connectivity patterns.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  3
    Don Beith (2013). Merleau-Ponty and the Institution of Animate Form. Chiasmi International 15:201-218.
    From his earliest work in The Structure of Behavior, Maurice Merleau-Ponty abrogates accounts of organic form that posit the organism as either passively ordered by the environment which precedes it, or as actively constituting its environment. I argue that Merleau-Ponty first develops what I term a genetic concept of form, in which the organism-environment relationship unfolds developmentally. This account of genetic form, however, requires a further concept of generative form to overcome the conceptual distinction between constituting activity and constituted passivity. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Kathleen R. Gibson (2012). Human Tool-Making Capacities Reflect Increased Information-Processing Capacities: Continuity Resides in the Eyes of the Beholder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):225-226.
    Chimpanzee/human technological differences are vast, reflect multiple interacting behavioral processes, and may result from the increased information-processing and hierarchical mental constructional capacities of the human brain. Therefore, advanced social, technical, and communicative capacities probably evolved together in concert with increasing brain size. Interpretations of these evolutionary and species differences as continuities or discontinuities reflect differing scientific perspectives.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    Randolph C. Grace & Simon Kemp (2013). Quantum Probability and Comparative Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):287-287.
    Evolution would favor organisms that can make recurrent decisions in accordance with classical probability (CP) theory, because such choices would be optimal in the long run. This is illustrated by the base-rate fallacy and probability matching, where nonhumans choose optimally but humans do not. Quantum probability (QP) theory may be able to account for these species differences in terms of orthogonal versus nonorthogonal representations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Paul S. Katz (2010). Comparative Studies Provide Evidence for Neural Reuse. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):278-279.
    Comparative studies demonstrate that homologous neural structures differ in function and that neural mechanisms underlying behavior evolved independently. A neural structure does not serve a particular function so much as it executes an algorithm on its inputs though its dynamics. Neural dynamics are altered by a neuromodulation, and species-differences in neuromodulation can account for behavioral differences.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  46
    Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello (2010). Primate Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   63 citations  
  50. Keith E. Stanovich & Richard F. West (2000). Individual Differences in Reasoning: Implications for the Rationality Debate? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):645-665.
    Much research in the last two decades has demonstrated that human responses deviate from the performance deemed normative according to various models of decision making and rational judgment (e.g., the basic axioms of utility theory). This gap between the normative and the descriptive can be interpreted as indicating systematic irrationalities in human cognition. However, four alternative interpretations preserve the assumption that human behavior and cognition is largely rational. These posit that the gap is due to (1) performance errors, (2) computational (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   114 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000