Search results for 'Speciesism' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Speciesism in Applied Ethics
  1. Simon Cushing (2003). Against "Humanism&Quot;: Speciesism, Personhood, and Preference. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):556–571.score: 18.0
    Article responds to the criticism of speciesism that it is somehow less immoral than other -isms by showing that this is a mistake resting on an inadequate taxonomy of the various -isms. Criticizes argument by Bonnie Steinbock that preference to your own species is not immoral by comparison with racism of comparable level.
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  2. Roger Wertheimer (2007). The Relevance of Speciesism to Life Sciences Practices. In Fred Adams (ed.), Ethics and the Life Sciences. Philosophy Document Center. 27-38.score: 18.0
    Properly understood speciesism regards membership in one's own species (e.g., being a fellow human being) as sufficient for sharing one's own moral status, but NOT as being necessary. Speciesism is consistent with any of a great range of attitudes toward alter-specific animals. When nonhuman animals are accorded a lesser moral status it is not per se because they are not human.
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  3. Oscar Horta (2010). What is Speciesism? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (3):243-266.score: 18.0
    In spite of the considerable literature nowadays existing on the issue of the moral exclusion of nonhuman animals, there is still work to be done concerning the characterization of the conceptual framework with which this question can be appraised. This paper intends to tackle this task. It starts by defining speciesism as the unjustified disadvantageous consideration or treatment of those who are not classified as belonging to a certain species. It then clarifies some common misunderstandings concerning what this means. (...)
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  4. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.score: 18.0
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether (...)
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  5. Tzachi Zamir (2006). Is Speciesism Opposed to Liberationism? Philosophia 34 (4):465-475.score: 18.0
    Speciesism” accords greater value to human beings and their interests. It is supposed to be opposed to a liberationist stance, since it is precisely the numerous forms of discounting of animal interests which liberationists oppose. This association is mistaken. In this paper I claim that many forms of speciesism are consistent with upholding a robust liberationist agenda. Accordingly, several hotly disputed topics in animal ethics can be set aside. The significance of such clarification is that synthesizing liberationism with (...)
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  6. Christopher Grau (forthcoming). McMahan on Speciesism and Deprivation. Southern Journal of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Jeff McMahan has shown himself to be a vigorous and incisive critic of speciesism, and he has been particularly critical of speciesist arguments that draw inspiration from Wittgenstein. In this essay I argue that McMahan’s ethical framework (as outlined in The Ethics of Killing) is more nuanced and more open to the incorporation of speciesist intuitions regarding deprivation than he himself sometimes suggests. I will also argue that a sensible speciesism can be pluralist and flexible enough to accommodate (...)
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  7. Constance K. Perry (2001). A Compassionate Autonomy Alternative to Speciesism. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):237-246.score: 18.0
    Many people in the animal welfare communityhave argued that the use of nonhuman animals inmedical research is necessarily based onspeciesism, an unjustified prejudice based onspecies membership. As such it is morally akinto racism and sexism. This is misguided. Thecombined capacities for autonomy and sentiencewith the obligations derived from relationssupport a morally justifiable rationale forusing some nonhuman animals in order to limitthe risk of harm to humans. There may be a fewcases where it is morally better to use a neversentient human (...)
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  8. Stijn Bruers (2013). Speciesism as a Moral Heuristic. Philosophia 41 (2):489-501.score: 18.0
    In the last decade, the study of moral heuristics has gained in importance. I argue that we can consider speciesism as a moral heuristic: an intuitive rule of thumb that substitutes a target attribute (that is difficult to detect, e.g. “having rationality”) for a heuristic attribute (that is easier to detect, e.g. “looking like a human being”). This speciesism heuristic misfires when applied to some atypical humans such as the mentally disabled, giving them rights although they lack rationality. (...)
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  9. Peter Singer (2009). Speciesism and Moral Status. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):567-581.score: 15.0
    Many people believe that all human life is of equal value. Most of them also believe that all human beings have a moral status superior to that of nonhuman animals. But how are these beliefs to be defended? The mere difference of species cannot in itself determine moral status. The most obvious candidate for regarding human beings as having a higher moral status than animals is the superior cognitive capacity of humans. People with profound mental retardation pose a problem for (...)
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  10. Christopher Grau, A Sensible Speciesism?score: 15.0
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  11. Joan Dunayer (2004). Speciesism. Ryce Pub..score: 15.0
     
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  12. Christopher Grau (2010). Moral Status, Speciesism, and Liao’s Genetic Account. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):387-96.score: 12.0
    This paper offers several criticisms of the account of rightholding laid out in S. Matthew Liao’s recent paper “The Basis of Human Moral Status.” I argue that Liao’s account both does too much and too little: it grants rightholder status to those who may not deserve it, and it does not provide grounds for offering such status to those who arguably do deserve it. Given these troubling aspects of his approach, I encourage Liao to abandon his “physical basis of moral (...)
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  13. Albert Mosley, Expanding the Moral Circle: From Racism to Speciesism.score: 12.0
    This paper reviews the argument by Peter Singer that speciesism, the exploitation of other species without regard for their interests, is as morally objectionable as racism and sexism. Objections to this argument by philosophers such as Peter Carruthers, Mary Midgley, and Cora Diamond as well as conventional wisdom about notions of species differences are presented and critically examined. I conclude that Alaine Locke would have supported Singer's expansion of the moral circle.
     
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  14. Bob Corbett, Bonnie Steinbock Comments and on and Criticisms of Peter Singer's "Speciesism" Argument.score: 12.0
    Bonnie Steinbock argues that Peter Singer has made an important contribution to remind us that animals deserve very special consideration, but that he fails to make a compelling case against "speciesism.".
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  15. Hugh LaFollette & Niall Shanks (1996). The Origin of Speciesism. Philosophy 71 (275):41-.score: 12.0
    Anti-vivisectionists charge that animal experimenters are speciesists people who unjustly discriminate against members of other species. Until recently most defenders of experimentation denied the charge. After the publication of `The Case for the Use of Animals in Biomedical Research' in the New England Journal of Medicine , experimenters had a more aggressive reply: `I am a speciesist. Speciesism is not merely plausible, it is essential for right conduct...'1. Most researchers now embrace Cohen's response as part of their defense of (...)
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  16. Bob Corbett, Bob Corbett's Comments On Peter Singer's Analysis That Leads to Speciesism.score: 12.0
    As we begin our exploration of our relationship with animals, we come face to face with Peter Singer and his insistence that speciesism is a vice. It is important to come to know what he means by speciesism, why he regards it as a moral mistake.
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  17. Peter Singer, Taking Humanism Beyond Speciesism.score: 12.0
    During nearly two millennia of European history in which Christian dogmas could not be questioned, many prejudices put down deep roots. Humanists are, rightly, critical of Christians who have not freed themselves of these prejudices-for example, against the equality of women or against nonreproductive sex. It is curious, therefore, that, despite many individual exceptions, humanists have on the whole been unable to free themselves from one of the most central of these Christian dogmas: the prejudice of speciesism.
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  18. Roger Fjellstrom (2003). Is Singer's Ethics Speciesist? Environmental Values 12 (1):91 - 106.score: 12.0
    To show favouritism toward humans has been considered a prejudice, otherwise known as 'human chauvinism', 'anthropocentrism' or 'speciesism'. Peter Singer is one philosopher in particular who holds this view. In this paper I argue that there is a lack of coherence between his ethical ideology and his actual ethical theory. Singer's ethics in crucial respects exhibits favouritism toward humans, which is something he fails to justify non-partially and plausibly. It would thus be an instance of speciesism, in a (...)
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  19. Roger Fjellstrom (2002). Specifying Speciesism. Environmental Values 11 (1):63 - 74.score: 12.0
    Many philosophers consider favouritism toward humans in the context of moral choice to be a prejudice. Several terms are used for it – 'speciesism', 'human chauvinism', 'human racism', and 'anthropocentrism' – with somewhat varying and often blurred meanings, which brings confusion to the issue. This essay suggests that only one term, 'speciesism', be used, and it attempts a conceptual clarification. To this end it proposes a set of conditions of adequacy for a concept that would be acceptable to (...)
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  20. Onora O'neill (1997). Environmental Values, Anthropocentrism and Speciesism. Environmental Values 6 (2):127 - 142.score: 10.0
    Ethical reasoning of all types is anthropocentric, in that it is addressed to agents, but anthropocentric starting points vary in the preference they accord the human species. Realist claims about environmental values, utilitarian reasoning and rights-based reasoning all have difficulties in according ethical concern to certain all aspects of natural world. Obligation-based reasoning can provide quite strong if incomplete reasons to protect the natural world, including individual non-human animals. Although it cannot establish all the conclusions to which anti-speciesists aspire, it (...)
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  21. Bonnie Steinbock (1978). Speciesism and the Idea of Equality. Philosophy 53 (204):247 - 256.score: 9.0
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  22. Marc Bekoff & Lofe Gruen (1993). Animal Welfare and Individual Characteristics: A Conversation Against Speciesism. Ethics and Behavior 3 (2):163 – 175.score: 9.0
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  23. Michael Goldman (2001). A Transcendental Defense of Speciesism. Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):59-69.score: 9.0
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  24. Michael Meyer (2001). The Simple Dignity of Sentient Life: Speciesism and Human Dignity. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):115–126.score: 9.0
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  25. Donald Graft (1997). Against Strong Speciesism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):107–118.score: 9.0
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  26. Mark Bernstein (2004). Neo-Speciesism. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (3):380–390.score: 9.0
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  27. Gary Varner (2011). Speciesism and Reverse Speciesism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):171 - 173.score: 9.0
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 171-173, June 2011.
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  28. T. M. Caro (1989). Making a Dent in Speciesism. Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):353-357.score: 9.0
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  29. S. Matthew Liao (2012). The Genetic Account of Moral Status: A Defense. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):265-277.score: 9.0
    Christopher Grau argues that the genetic basis for moral agency account of rightholding is problematic because it fails to grant all human beings the moral status of rightholding; it grants the status of rightholding to entities that do not intuitively deserve such status; and it assumes that the genetic basis for moral agency has intrinsic/final value, but the genetic basis for moral agency only has instrumental value. Grau also argues that those who are inclined to hold that all human beings (...)
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  30. Frederik Kaufman (1998). Speciesism and the Argument From Misfortune. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):155–163.score: 9.0
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  31. Oscar Horta (2010). The Ethics of the Ecology of Fear Against the Nonspeciesist Paradigm: A Shift in the Aims of Intervention in Nature. Between the Species 13 (10):163-187.score: 9.0
    Humans often intervene in the wild for anthropocentric or environmental reasons. An example of such interventions is the reintroduction of wolves in places where they no longer live in order to create what has been called an “ecology of fear”, which is being currently discussed in places such as Scotland. In the first part of this paper I discuss the reasons for this measure and argue that they are not compatible with a nonspeciesist approach. Then, I claim that if we (...)
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  32. E. Gavin Reeve (1978). Speciesism and Equality. Philosophy 53 (206):562 - 563.score: 9.0
  33. Roger Crisp (1985). A Comment on 'On Behalf of a Moderate Speciesism' by Alan Holland. Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):279-280.score: 9.0
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  34. Alan J. Holland (1984). On Behalf of Moderate Speciesism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (2):281-291.score: 9.0
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  35. Roger Paden (1992). Deconstructing Speciesism. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):55-64.score: 9.0
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  36. Peter Singer (2010). 19 Speciesism and Moral Status Peter Singer. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 331.score: 9.0
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  37. Oscar Horta (2014). The Scope of the Argument From Species Overlap. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):142-154.score: 9.0
    The argument from species overlap has been widely used in the literature on animal ethics and speciesism. However, there has been much confusion regarding what the argument proves and what it does not prove, and regarding the views it challenges. This article intends to clarify these confusions, and to show that the name most often used for this argument (‘the argument from marginal cases’) reflects and reinforces these misunderstandings. The article claims that the argument questions not only those defences (...)
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  38. Mark Bernstein (1991). Speciesism and Loyalty. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (1):43 - 59.score: 9.0
    It is undeniable that many human practices are detrimental to the well-being of non-human animals. Among other things, we trap and hunt them, experiment upon them, and kill them to use their flesh for food. We cause pain and suffering, and so a moral justification for these activities is required. Traditionally such a justification has taken the form of claiming that humans have some property–intelligence, ability to morally deliberate, etc.–which is both morally significant and missing in non-humans. However, once we (...)
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  39. Jason Wyckoff (2014). Linking Sexism and Speciesism. Hypatia 29 (3).score: 9.0
    Some feminists and animal advocates defend what I call the Linked Oppressions Thesis, according to which the oppression of women and the oppression of animals are linked causally, materially, normatively, and/or conceptually. Alasdair Cochrane offers objections to several versions of the Linked Oppressions Thesis and concludes that the Thesis should be rejected in all its forms. In this paper I defend the Thesis against Cochrane's objections as well as objections leveled by Beth Dixon, and argue that the failure of these (...)
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  40. Maurice L. Wade (1996). Sports and Speciesism. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 23 (1):10-29.score: 9.0
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  41. J. A. Gray (1991). On Strangerism and Speciesism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):756-757.score: 9.0
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  42. Melanie Joy (2002). Toward a Non-Speciesist Psychoethic. Society and Animals 10 (4):457-458.score: 9.0
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  43. Steve F. Sapontzis (2014). Speciesism, Painism, and Morality. Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (1):95-102,.score: 9.0
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  44. Raymond G. Frey (1988). Moral Standing, the Value of Lives, and Speciesism. Between the Species 4 (3):10.score: 9.0
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  45. J. A. Gray (1990). In Defence of Speciesism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22-23.score: 9.0
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  46. Evelyn Pluhar (1988). Speciesism: A Form of Bigotry or a Justified View? Between the Species 4 (2):3.score: 9.0
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  47. Richard D. Ryder (2004). Speciesism Revisited. Think 2 (6):83-92.score: 9.0
    Richard Ryder recounts the birth of the term.
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  48. S. F. Sapontzis (1990). The Meaning of Speciesism and the Forms of Animal Suffering. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):35-36.score: 9.0
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  49. Marc Bekoff (1998). Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. Bioscience 48 (8):638-641.score: 9.0
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  50. T. Benton (1988). Marx, Humanism and Speciesism'. Radical Philosophy 50.score: 9.0
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