Search results for 'Speech' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Another Mode of Metalinguistic Speech (1987). Kazuhide Suhara* Another Mode of Metalinguistic Speech: Multi-Modal Logic on a New Basis. International Logic Review: Rassegna Internazionale di Logica 15 (1):38.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. John R. Searle (1969). Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Written in an outstandingly clear and lively style, it provokes its readers to rethink issues they may have regarded as long since settled.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   524 citations  
  3. Axel Gelfert (2015). Inner Speech, Natural Language, and the Modularity of the Mind. Kairos 14:7-29.
    Inner speech is a pervasive feature of our conscious mental lives. Yet its function and character remain an issue of philosophical debate. The present paper focuses on the relation between inner speech and natural language and on the cognitive functions that various contributors have ascribed to inner speech. In particular, it is argued that inner speech does not consist of bare, context-free internal presentations of sentential (or subsentential) content, but rather has an ineliminably perspectival element. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  42
    Helga Varden (2010). A Kantian Conception of Free Speech. In Deidre Golash (ed.), Free Speech in a Diverse World. Springer
    In this paper I provide an interpretation of Kant’s conception of free speech. Free speech is understood as the kind of speech that is constitutive of interaction respectful of everybody’s right to freedom, and it requires what we with John Rawls may call ‘public reason’. Public reason so understood refers to how the public authority must reason in order to properly specify the political relation between citizens. My main aim is to give us some reasons for taking (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Willem J. M. Levelt, Ardi Roelofs & Antje S. Meyer (1999). A Theory of Lexical Access in Speech Production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):1-38.
    Preparing words in speech production is normally a fast and accurate process. We generate them two or three per second in fluent conversation; and overtly naming a clear picture of an object can easily be initiated within 600 msec after picture onset. The underlying process, however, is exceedingly complex. The theory reviewed in this target article analyzes this process as staged and feedforward. After a first stage of conceptual preparation, word generation proceeds through lexical selection, morphological and phonological encoding, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   100 citations  
  6. Fernando Martínez-Manrique & Agustin Vicente (2010). What The...! The Role of Inner Speech in Conscious Thought. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):141-67.
    Abstract: Introspection reveals that one is frequently conscious of some form of inner speech, which may appear either in a condensed or expanded form. It has been claimed that this speech reflects the way in which language is involved in conscious thought, fulfilling a number of cognitive functions. We criticize three theories that address this issue: Bermúdez’s view of language as a generator of second-order thoughts, Prinz’s development of Jackendoff’s intermediate-level theory of consciousness, and Carruthers’s theory of inner (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  7. Marta Jorba & Agustin Vicente (2014). Cognitive Phenomenology, Access to Contents, and Inner Speech. Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (9-10):74-99.
    In this paper we introduce two issues relevantly related to the cognitive phenomenology debate, which, to our minds, have not been yet properly addressed: the relation between access and phenomenal consciousness in cognition and the relation between conscious thought and inner speech. In the first case, we ask for an explanation of how we have access to thought contents, and in the second case, an explanation of why is inner speech so pervasive in our conscious thinking. We discuss (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. John Turri (2010). Epistemic Invariantism and Speech Act Contextualism. Philosophical Review 119 (1):77-95.
    In this essay I show how to reconcile epistemic invariantism with the knowledge account of assertion. My basic proposal is that we can comfortably combine invariantism with the knowledge account of assertion by endorsing contextualism about speech acts. My demonstration takes place against the backdrop of recent contextualist attempts to usurp the knowledge account of assertion, most notably Keith DeRose's influential argument that the knowledge account of assertion spells doom for invariantism and enables contextualism's ascendancy.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  9.  32
    Seungbae Park (2016). On the Relationship Between Speech Acts and Psychological States. Pragmatics and Cognition 23 (2):431-352.
    This paper defends a theory of speech act that I call concurrentism. It consists of the following three theses. 1. We believe, ceteris paribus, that other people’s speech acts concur with their beliefs. 2. Our speech acts, ceteris paribus, concur with our beliefs. 3. When our speech acts deviate from our beliefs, we do not, ceteris paribus, declare the deviations to other people. Concurrentism sheds light on what the hearer believes when he hears an indicative sentence, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Agustin Vicente (2014). The Comparator Account on Thought Insertion, Alien Voices and Inner Speech: Some Open Questions. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):335-353.
    Recently, many philosophers and psychologists have claimed that the explanation that grounds both passivity phenomena in the cognitive domain and passivity phenomena that occur with respect to overt actions is, along broad lines, the same. Furthermore, they claim that the best account we have of such phenomena in both scenarios is the “comparator” account. However, there are reasons to doubt whether the comparator model can be exported from the realm of overt actions to the cognitive domain in general. There is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11.  81
    Peter Langland-Hassan, Frank R. Faries, Michael J. Richardson & Aimee Dietz (2015). Inner Speech Deficits in Aphasia. Frontiers in Psychology 6 (528):1-10.
    Despite the ubiquity of inner speech in our mental lives, methods for objectively assessing inner speech capacities remain underdeveloped. The most common means of assessing inner speech is to present participants with tasks requiring them to silently judge whether two words rhyme. We developed a version of this task to assess the inner speech of a population of patients with aphasia and corresponding language production deficits. Patients’ performance on the silent rhyming task was severely impaired relative (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  94
    Peter Langland-Hassan (2008). Fractured Phenomenologies: Thought Insertion, Inner Speech, and the Puzzle of Extraneity. Mind and Language 23 (4):369-401.
    Abstract: How it is that one's own thoughts can seem to be someone else's? After noting some common missteps of other approaches to this puzzle, I develop a novel cognitive solution, drawing on and critiquing theories that understand inserted thoughts and auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia as stemming from mismatches between predicted and actual sensory feedback. Considerable attention is paid to forging links between the first-person phenomenology of thought insertion and the posits (e.g. efference copy, corollary discharge) of current cognitive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  13. Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martínez-Manrique (2011). Inner Speech: Nature and Functions. Philosophy Compass 6 (3):209-219.
    We very often discover ourselves engaged in inner speech. It seems that this kind of silent, private, speech fulfils some role in our cognition, most probably related to conscious thinking. Yet, the study of inner speech has been neglected by philosophy and psychology alike for many years. However, things seem to have changed in the last two decades. Here we review some of the most influential accounts about the phenomenology and the functions of inner speech, as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  8
    David E. Kieras, Gregory H. Wakefield, Eric R. Thompson, Nandini Iyer & Brian D. Simpson (2016). Modeling Two‐Channel Speech Processing With the EPIC Cognitive Architecture. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):291-304.
    An important application of cognitive architectures is to provide human performance models that capture psychological mechanisms in a form that can be “programmed” to predict task performance of human–machine system designs. Although many aspects of human performance have been successfully modeled in this approach, accounting for multitalker speech task performance is a novel problem. This article presents a model for performance in a two-talker task that incorporates concepts from psychoacoustics, in particular, masking effects and stream formation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. John Turri (2013). Pyrrhonian Skepticism Meets Speech-Act Theory. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (2):83-98.
    This paper applies speech-act theory to craft a new response to Pyrrhonian skepticism and diagnose its appeal. Carefully distinguishing between different levels of language-use and noting their interrelations can help us identify a subtle mistake in a key Pyrrhonian argument.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  90
    Alain Morin (2005). Possible Links Between Self-Awareness and Inner Speech: Theoretical Background, Underlying Mechanisms, and Empirical Evidence. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):115-134.
    been recently proposed (Morin, 2003; 2004). The model takes into account most known mechanisms and processes leading to self-awareness, and examines their multiple and complex interactions. Inner speech is postulated to play a key-role in this model, as it establishes important connections between many of its ele- ments. This paper first reviews past and current references to a link between self-awareness and inner speech. It then presents an analysis of the nature of the relation between these two concepts. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  17. Caleb Yong (2011). Does Freedom of Speech Include Hate Speech? Res Publica 17 (4):385-403.
    I take it that liberal justice recognises special protections against the restriction of speech and expression; this is what I call the Free Speech Principle. I ask if this Principle includes speech acts which might broadly be termed ‘hate speech’, where ‘includes’ is sensitive to the distinction between coverage and protection , and between speech that is regulable and speech that should be regulated . I suggest that ‘hate speech’ is too broad a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  28
    Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler (2000). Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The modular Race (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  19. Peter Langland‐Hassan (2014). Inner Speech and Metacognition: In Search of a Connection. Mind and Language 29 (5):511-533.
    Many theorists claim that inner speech is importantly linked to human metacognition (thinking about one's own thinking). However, their proposals all rely upon unworkable conceptions of the content and structure of inner speech episodes. The core problem is that they require inner speech episodes to have both auditory-phonological contents and propositional/semantic content. Difficulties for the views emerge when we look closely at how such contents might be integrated into one or more states or processes. The result is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  33
    Peter F. MacNeilage (1998). The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech Production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):499-511.
    The species-specific organizational property of speech is a continual mouth open-close alternation, the two phases of which are subject to continual articulatory modulation. The cycle constitutes the syllable, and the open and closed phases are segments framescontent displays that are prominent in many nonhuman primates. The new role of Broca's area and its surround in human vocal communication may have derived from its evolutionary history as the main cortical center for the control of ingestive processes. The frame and content (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  21.  14
    Stephen Barker (forthcoming). Figurative Speech: Pointing a Poisoned Arrow at the Heart of Semantics. Philosophical Studies:1-18.
    I argue that figurative speech, and irony in particular, presents a deep challenge to the orthodox view about sentence content. The standard view is that sentence contents are, at their core, propositional contents: truth-conditional contents. Moreover, the only component of a sentence’s content that embeds in compound sentences, like belief reports or conditionals, is the propositional content. I argue that a careful analysis of irony shows this view cannot be maintained. Irony is a purely pragmatic form of content that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  83
    John Eriksson (2011). Straight Talk: Conceptions of Sincerity in Speech. Philosophical Studies 153 (2):213-234.
    What is it for a speech act to be sincere? The most common answer amongst philosophers is that a speech act is sincere if and only if the speaker is in the state of mind that the speech act functions to express. However, a number of philosophers have advanced counterexamples purporting to demonstrate that having the expressed state of mind is neither necessary nor sufficient for speaking sincerely. One may nevertheless doubt whether these considerations refute the orthodox (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  23. Maciej Witek (2013). Three Approaches to the Study of Speech Acts. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):129-141.
    The paper reconstructs and discusses three different approaches to the study of speech acts: (i) the intentionalist approach, according to which most illocutionary acts are to be analysed as utterances made with the Gricean communicative intentions, (ii) the institutionalist approach, which is based on the idea of illocutions as institutional acts constituted by systems of collectively accepted rules, and (iii) the interactionalist approach the main tenet of which is to perform illocutionary acts by making conventional moves in accordance with (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  8
    Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore (2005). Insensitive Semantics: A Defense of Semantic Minimalism and Speech Act Pluralism. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Insensitive Semantics_ is an overview of and contribution to the debates about how to accommodate context sensitivity within a theory of human communication, investigating the effects of context on communicative interaction and, as a corollary, what a context of utterance is and what it is to be in one. Provides detailed and wide-ranging overviews of the central positions and arguments surrounding contextualism Addresses broad and varied aspects of the distinction between the semantic and non-semantic content of language Defends a distinctive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  25. Robert S. Taylor (2012). Hate Speech, the Priority of Liberty, and the Temptations of Nonideal Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):353-68.
    Are government restrictions on hate speech consistent with the priority of liberty? This relatively narrow policy question will serve as the starting point for a wider discussion of the use and abuse of nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy, especially as practiced on the academic left. I begin by showing that hate speech (understood as group libel) can undermine fair equality of opportunity for historically-oppressed groups but that the priority of liberty seems to forbid its restriction. This tension (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Claudia Bianchi (2008). Indexicals, Speech Acts and Pornography. Analysis 68 (300):310-316.
    In the last twenty years, recorded messages and written notes have become a significant test and an intriguing puzzle for the semantics of indexical expressions (see Smith 1989, Predelli 1996, 1998a,1998b, 2002, Corazza et al. 2002, Romdenh-Romluc 2002). In particular, the intention-based approach proposed by Stefano Predelli has proven to bear interesting relations to several major questions in philosophy of language. In a recent paper (Saul 2006), Jennifer Saul draws on the literature on indexicals and recorded messages in order to (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27. Blake Myers-Schulz, Maia Pujara, Richard Wolf & Michael Koenigs (2013). Inherent Emotional Quality of Human Speech Sounds. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1105-1113.
    During much of the past century, it was widely believed that phonemes--the human speech sounds that constitute words--have no inherent semantic meaning, and that the relationship between a combination of phonemes (a word) and its referent is simply arbitrary. Although recent work has challenged this picture by revealing psychological associations between certain phonemes and particular semantic contents, the precise mechanisms underlying these associations have not been fully elucidated. Here we provide novel evidence that certain phonemes have an inherent, non-arbitrary (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  17
    Vincent Blok (2013). The Power of Speech Acts: Reflections on a Performative Concept of Ethical Oaths in Economics and Business. Review of Social Economy 71 (2):187-208.
    Ethical oaths for bankers, economists and managers are increasingly seen as successful instruments to ensure more responsible behaviour. In this article, we reflect on the nature of ethical oaths. Based on John Austin's speech act theory and the work of Emmanuel Levinas, we introduce a performative concept of ethical oaths that is characterised by (1) the existential self-performative of the one I want to be, which is (2) demanded by the public context. Because ethical oaths are (3) structurally threatened (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29.  79
    Michael C. Corballis (2003). From Mouth to Hand: Gesture, Speech, and the Evolution of Right-Handedness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):199-208.
    The strong predominance of right-handedness appears to be a uniquely human characteristic, whereas the left-cerebral dominance for vocalization occurs in many species, including frogs, birds, and mammals. Right-handedness may have arisen because of an association between manual gestures and vocalization in the evolution of language. I argue that language evolved from manual gestures, gradually incorporating vocal elements. The transition may be traced through changes in the function of Broca's area. Its homologue in monkeys has nothing to do with vocal control, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  30.  6
    Bart Boer (2016). Modeling Co‐Evolution of Speech and Biology. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):459-468.
    Two computer simulations are investigated that model interaction of cultural evolution of language and biological evolution of adaptations to language. Both are agent-based models in which a population of agents imitates each other using realistic vowels. The agents evolve under selective pressure for good imitation. In one model, the evolution of the vocal tract is modeled; in the other, a cognitive mechanism for perceiving speech accurately is modeled. In both cases, biological adaptations to using and learning speech evolve, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  13
    Marcus Schulzke (2016). The Social Benefits of Protecting Hate Speech and Exposing Sources of Prejudice. Res Publica 22 (2):225-242.
    I argue that there are strong consequentialist grounds for thinking that hate speech should be legally protected. The protection of hate speech allows those who are hateful to make their beliefs public, thereby exposing prejudices that might otherwise be suppressed to evaluation by other members of society. This greater transparency about prejudices has two social benefits. First, it facilitates social trust by making it easier to discover who holds beliefs that should exclude them from positions of authority, responsibility, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  52
    Mary Lyn Stoll (2005). Corporate Rights to Free Speech? Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):261 - 269.
    . Although the courts have ruled that companies are legal persons, they have not yet made clear the extent to which political free speech for corporations is limited by the strictures legitimately placed upon corporate commercial speech. I explore the question of whether or not companies can properly be said to have the right to civil free speech or whether corporate speech is always de facto commercial speech not subject to the same sorts of legal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  33.  44
    Aarre Laakso & Paco Calvo (2011). How Many Mechanisms Are Needed to Analyze Speech? A Connectionist Simulation of Structural Rule Learning in Artificial Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1243-1281.
    Some empirical evidence in the artificial language acquisition literature has been taken to suggest that statistical learning mechanisms are insufficient for extracting structural information from an artificial language. According to the more than one mechanism (MOM) hypothesis, at least two mechanisms are required in order to acquire language from speech: (a) a statistical mechanism for speech segmentation; and (b) an additional rule-following mechanism in order to induce grammatical regularities. In this article, we present a set of neural network (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  49
    Katharine Gelber (2010). Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
    Much of the most influential free speech scholarship emphasises that ‘political speech’ warrants the very highest standards of protection because of its centrality to self-governance. This central idea mitigates against efforts to justify the regulation of political speech and renders some egregiously offensive or harmful speech worthy of protection from a theoretical perspective. Yet paradoxically, in practice, in many liberal democracies such speech is routinely restricted. In this paper, I develop an argument that is compatible (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  31
    Andrés Moles (2007). Autonomy, Free Speech and Automatic Behaviour. Res Publica 13 (1):53-75.
    One of the strongest defences of free speech holds that autonomy requires the protection of speech. In this paper I examine five conditions that autonomy must satisfy. I survey recent research in social psychology regarding automatic behaviour, and a challenge to autonomy is articulated. I argue that a plausible strategy for neutralising some of the autonomy-threatening automatic responses consists in avoiding the exposure to the environmental features that trigger them. If this is so, we can good autonomy-based pro (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  36.  11
    Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys & Dirk Van Braeckel (2008). A Speech-Act Model for Talking to Management. Building a Framework for Evaluating Communication Within the Sri Engagement Process. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):77 - 91.
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has grown considerably over the past three decades. One form of SRI, engagement-SRI, is today by far the most practiced form of SRI (in assets managed) and has the potential to mainstream SRI even further. However, lack of formalized engagement procedures and evaluation tools leave the engagement practice too opaque for such a mainstreaming. This article can be considered as a first step in the development of a standard for the engagement practice. By developing an engagement (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  37.  10
    Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka (2014). Superlative Quantifiers and Meta-Speech Acts. Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (1):41-90.
    Recent research has shown that the superlative quantifiers at least and at most do not have the same type of truth conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than and fewer than. We propose that superlative quantifiers are interpreted at the level of speech acts. We relate them to denegations of speech acts, as in I don’t promise to come, which we analyze as excluding the speech act of a promise to come. Calling such conversational acts that affect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  87
    Maleiha Malik (2011). Religious Freedom, Free Speech and Equality: Conflict or Cohesion? Res Publica 17 (1):21-40.
    There have recently been a number of high profile political incidents, and legal cases, that raise questions about hate speech. At the same time, the tensions, and perceived conflicts, between religion and sexuality have become controversial topics. This paper considers the relationship between religious freedom, free speech and equality through an analysis of recent case law in Great Britain, Canada and the United States. The paper starts with a discussion of how conflicts between these values arise in areas (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  6
    Mihaela Popa-Wyatt (forthcoming). Compound Figures: Priority and Speech-Act Structure. Philosophical Studies:1-21.
    Compound figures are a rich, and under-explored area for tackling fundamental issues in philosophy of language. This paper explores new ideas about how to explain some features of such figures. We start with an observation from Stern that in ironic-metaphor, metaphor is logically prior to irony in the structure of what is communicated. Call this thesis Logical-MPT. We argue that a speech-act-based explanation of Logical-MPT is to be preferred to a content-based explanation. To create this explanation we draw on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  18
    Sung-Joo Lim & Lori L. Holt (2011). Learning Foreign Sounds in an Alien World: Videogame Training Improves Non-Native Speech Categorization. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1390-1405.
    Although speech categories are defined by multiple acoustic dimensions, some are perceptually weighted more than others and there are residual effects of native-language weightings in non-native speech perception. Recent research on nonlinguistic sound category learning suggests that the distribution characteristics of experienced sounds influence perceptual cue weights: Increasing variability across a dimension leads listeners to rely upon it less in subsequent category learning (Holt & Lotto, 2006). The present experiment investigated the implications of this among native Japanese learning (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  45
    Jan P. de Ruiter, Adrian Bangerter & Paula Dings (2012). The Interplay Between Gesture and Speech in the Production of Referring Expressions: Investigating the Tradeoff Hypothesis. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):232-248.
    The tradeoff hypothesis in the speech–gesture relationship claims that (a) when gesturing gets harder, speakers will rely relatively more on speech, and (b) when speaking gets harder, speakers will rely relatively more on gestures. We tested the second part of this hypothesis in an experimental collaborative referring paradigm where pairs of participants (directors and matchers) identified targets to each other from an array visible to both of them. We manipulated two factors known to affect the difficulty of speaking (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Barry Smith (2003). John Searle: From Speech Acts to Social Reality. In John Searle. Cambridge University Press 1--33.
    We provide an overview of Searle's contributions to speech act theory and the ontology of social reality, focusing on his theory of constitutive rules. In early versions of this theory, Searle proposed that all such rules have the form 'X counts as Y in context C' formula – as for example when Barack Obama (X) counts as President of the United States (Y) in the context of US political affairs. Crucially, the X and the Y terms are here identical. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  28
    Rae Langton (forthcoming). Hate Speech and the Epistemology of Justice. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-9.
    In ‘The Harm in Hate Speech’ Waldron’s most interesting and ground-breaking contribution lies in a distinctive epistemological role he assigns to hate speech legislation: it is necessary for assurance of justice, and thus for justice itself. He regards public social recognition of what is owed to citizens as a public good, contributing to basic dignity and social standing of citizens. His claim that hate speech in the public social environment damages assurance of justice has wider implications, I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  85
    Irene Appelbaum (1998). Fodor, Modularity, and Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 11 (3):317-330.
    Fodor argues that speech perception is accomplished by a module. Typically, modular processing is taken to be bottom-up processing. Yet there is ubiquitous empirical evidence that speech perception is influenced by top-down processing. Fodor attempts to resolve this conflict by denying that modular processing must be exclusively bottom-up. It is argued, however, that Fodor's attempt to reconcile top-down and modular processing fails, because: (i) it undermines Fodor's own conception of modular processing; and (ii) it cannot account for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45.  33
    Jessica Rett (2011). Exclamatives, Degrees and Speech Acts. Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (5):411-442.
    The goal of this paper is an account of the semantics and pragmatics of exclamation. I focus on two key observations: first, that sentence exclamations like Wow, John bakes delicious desserts! and exclamatives like What delicious desserts John bakes! express that a particular proposition has violated the speaker’s expectations; and second, that exclamatives are semantically restricted in a way that sentence exclamations are not. In my account of these facts, I propose a characterization of illocutionary force of exclamation, a function (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  61
    Casey O'Callaghan (2015). Speech Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford
    Is speech special? This paper evaluates the evidence that speech perception is distinctive when compared with non-linguistic auditory perception. It addresses the phenomenology, contents, objects, and mechanisms involved in the perception of spoken language. According to the account it proposes, the capacity to perceive speech in a manner that enables understanding is an acquired perceptual skill. It involves learning to hear language-specific types of ethologically significant sounds. According to this account, the contents of perceptual experience when listening (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  63
    Christopher Mole (2009). The Motor Theory of Speech Perception. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press
    There is a long‐standing project in psychology the goal of which is to explain our ability to perceive speech. The project is motivated by evidence that seems to indicate that the cognitive processing to which speech sounds are subjected is somehow different from the normal processing employed in hearing. The Motor Theory of speech perception was proposed in the 1960s as an attempt to explain this specialness. The first part of this essay is concerned with the Motor (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  47
    Barry Smith (1984). Ten Conditions on a Theory of Speech Acts. Theoretical Linguistics 11 (3):309-330.
    It is now generally recognized that figures such as Reid, Peirce, and Reinach formulated theories of speech acts avant la lettre of Austin and Searle, in Reid and Reinach’s cases under the heading ‘theory of social acts’. Here we address the question as to what conditions would have to be satisfied for such theories to count as ‘theories of speech acts’ in the now familiar sense.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  13
    Robert Post (2009). Constitutional Restraints on the Regulations of Scientific Speech and Scientific Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):431-438.
    The question of what constitutional constraints should apply to government efforts to regulate scientific speech is frequently contrasted to the question of what constitutional constraints should apply to government efforts to regulate scientific research. This comment argues that neither question is well formulated for constitutional analysis, which should instead turn on the relationship to constitutional values of specific acts of scientific speech and research.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50. Boudewijn de Bruin (2008). Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000